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THE 



BaseBallGuide 

AND 

Official LeagQe Book for 1894. 

A COMPLETE HAND BOOK OF THE NATIONAL GAME OF 
BASE BALL. 

CONTAINING THE 

FULL OFFICIAL LEAGUE RECORD 
FOR 1893. 

TOGETHER WITH 

THE NEW CODE OF PLAYING RULES AS REVISED BY THE 

COMxMITTEE OF RULES. 

ATTACHED TO WHICH ARE EXPLANATORY NOTES, Giving a 
^ CORRECT Interpretation of the New Rules. 

' -^ A PROMINENT FEATURE OF THE 

y ■ ' GUIDE I=OR 1B9^ 

^' IS 



THE COMPLETE PITCHING RECORDS OF 1893, TO WHICH 
ARE ADDED SPECIAL CHAPTERS ON THE BAT- 
TING, FIELDING AND BASE RUNNING 

together WITH > • 'O .y-^ s" ^ 

Interesting Records of the Most Noteworthy Contests, 

Incidents and Occurrences of the Eventful Season 

of 1893, Occurring in the College Arena as well as 

that of the Profb^ional Clubs. 

ei^P^ by ' , ., 

HENRY CHADWICK. 

PUBLISHED BY 

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

241 Broadway, New York City. 



Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1894, by American Sports Pub 
lishing Company, in the office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington. 



PllEFACE. 

Spalding's League Guide for 1894 is the seventeenth 
annual edition of the work, as the first League Guide was 
issued in the spring of 1S76. For the past dozen years the 
Guide has been the leading publication of its kind in the 
professional base ball world ; and for 3'ears past has stood 
alone as the model hand book of the entire base ball frater- 
nity, amateur and professional alike, as it is the only 
authorized book of rules and statistics of the professional 
clubs of the country now issued, as the appended endorse- 
ment by the President of the National League proves: 

Washington, D. C, March, 1S94. 
By authority vested in me, I do hereby certify that 
Messrs. A. G. Spalding & Bros, have been granted the 
exclusive right to publish the "Official League Book" 
for 1894. 

N. E. YOUNG, 
Secretary the National League and American 

Association Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

The interesting features of The Guide for 1894 include 
not only the official League Club averages for the past 
season, but also special chapters on the organization of the 
twelve club league, with editorial comments on the promi- 
nent events and occurrences of the League campaign of 
1893; the records of the phenomenal contests of the past 
season, and a special chapter on college base ball, together 
with the full pitching records of the season, the latter of 
which have been the feature of the Guide for the past six 
years. To these are added instructive articles on the 
points of play in ''learn work," at the bal, in the Jielii 
ixn&Jwi'pase running. Added to The Guide for 1894 is an 
appendix to the code of players' rules giving ihe editor's 
intWpretations of the most prominent rules of the code, and 
especially of the rules which were amended last March, 
and which interpretations are endorsed by President Young, 
to whom they were submitted for approval. 






INTRODUCTION. 



Never before, in the annals of our national t^ame, was there 
recorded a single season which equalled that of 1893 in the 
number of base ball clubs which took the field throughout 
the entire base ball world; and also in the general attend- 
ance at match games on enclosed grounds in the United 
States, on which both amateur club nines as well as profes- 
sional club teams took part; and likewise in the nmnber of 
games played throughout the year, North, South, East and 
West. Besides which, base ball was played on foreign fields, 
especially in England and Australia, to an extent surpassing 
in number of matches any previous year since the Spalding 
tourists played their exhibition games in Australia, India, 
Egypt, on the Continent of Europe and in Great Britaio. 
There was a great deal of talk during the revolutionary period 
of professional base ball history, in 1890 and 1891, about " the oO 
great decline of base ball in popularity ; " but this was, in real- 
ity, little else than newspaper sensationalism ; inasmuch as it 
applied only to the comparatively limited field occupied by 
the professional exemplars of the game. The amateur class 
of the fraternity was not in the least adversely aCfected by 
the demonstration in the professional ranks during the 
players' revolt in 1890; or during the season of the secession 
of the old American Association from the national agree- 
ment government, which followed it in 1891. On the con- 
trary, the college clubs of the amateur class of the fraternity 
benefited greatly by the base ball war of those two years, 
the attendance at the Harvard, Yale and Princeton games 
never before having been as large as during those two years 
of professional club demoralization. But like the results of 
the great War of the rebellion in the early sixties — the out- 
come of which was the destruction of the curse of human 
slavery — the professional base ball business was really bene- 
fited by the purifying effects of the base ball rebellion and 
secession of the early nineties; and to-day the great Major 
League, which grew out of the revolution of 1891, stands 
forth as the permanently established governing power of 
the whole professional fraternity. 

Never before, too, have sports and pastimes in general, 
and field games in particular, reached so great a degree of 
popularity as they command at this very day. For years 
Great Britain held entire supremacy in the athletic world 
of civilized countries, but now the United States rivals 



6 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

the British nation ; and the time is not far distant 
when American athletes will carry off championship honors 
in every manly sport and pastime in vogue ; as they have 
already done in the most prominent sports of the period, of 
which England's great specialty in sports, yachting, affords 
a shining example. 

The decade of the nineties inthe American athletic arena, 
as well as in that of Great Britain, has seen an era of bru- 
tality in sports entered upon, which, it is to be hoped, time 
will end in due course. It has already culminated, and a 
sensible reaction set in in 1894. In this connection, and 
without enumerating the specially brutal sports still in 
vogue, it is timely to state that our national game, while at 
the same time fully developing every true manly qualifica- 
tion in the form of courage, endurance, pluck and nerve, 
which the best of manly sports requires, is entirely devoid 
of a single br^ital feature. In this respect base ball stands 
out in brilliant and attractive colors. Moreover, the game, 
as played by its professional exemplars, occupies an excep- 
tional position for the honesty which characterizes the con- 
tests played under the auspices of the great Major League 
and its Minor League branches. This it is which commands 
a public support and patronage unequalled in field games. 
In fact, base ball, as played by the clubs of the National 
League, is familiarly known as "the only honest sport in 
vogue in which professional exemplars take part." 

A BRIEF HISTORY OF PROFESSIONAL BALL PLAYING, 

GIVING THE RECORDED EVENTS OF SPECIAL NOTE, 
FROM 1S7L TO 1893 INCLUSIVE. 

Our national game has, during the past twenty odd years 
of professional club history, gone through some trying 
ordeals ; beginning with the period of the existence of the first 
professional national association in 1S71, and culminating 
in the establishment, on a permanent footing, of the exist- 
ing reconstructed National League in 1892. During the 
decade of the seventies, professional ball playing had to 
struggle for life against the abuses of crookedness in its 
club ranks, brought about by that curse of sports, pool sell- 
ing; and this evil of dishonesty led to the organization of 
the " National League of Professional Clubs," in 1876, which 
replaced the original " National Association of Professional 
Ball Players" first organized in 1 871. During the decade 
of the eighties, the rival professional club organization, 
known as the " American Association," sprang into exist- 
ence, and following its advent came the evil of contract 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



7 



breaking and '' ?'evolvzng,'' with the kindred abuses of 
drunkenness and insubordination in the ranks of both of 
the then existing major professional organizations, brought 
into existence by the rivalry for players between the two 
organizations. Despite these early drawbacks to the 
success of professionalism in base ball, so great was the 
inherent attractions of the game itself, that the professional 
clubs flourished to an extent surprising under the circum- 
stances. Then followed the era of the rule of the " national 
agreement' a mutual compact between the two major pro- 
fessional organizations, brought about by the absolute neces- 
sity for defensive operations against the prevailing abuses 
of the period, which had threatened the very life of pro- 
fessional ball playing. Under the beneficial operation of 
the national agreement, the professional clubs benefited 
financially to an extent which, in 1889, culminated in the 
ending ot the most brilliant and financially successful season 
previously known in the history of professional ball playing. 
^ The opening year of the decade of the nineties, however, 
inaugurated a revolutionary period, which was followed by 
such utter demoralization in the club ranks as almost to 
give the death blow to the whole professional system. The 
Brotherhood revolt of the star players of the two major 
organizations in 1890 was due, in a large measure, to the 
rivalry between tne League and the Association in the 
efforts made by the clubs of the two organizations to 
strengthen their club teams from each other's ranks, a 
rivalry which the star players of the period were quick to 
take advantage of, and to surh an extent as to run up sal- 
aries to ruinous figures ; and finally to efforts on the part of 
a minority of the players to take possession of the club 
business for themselves. Such was the rotten condition of 
things in the professional base ball w^orld at the close of the 
demoralizing season of i8go, that in 1891 the American 
Association became, as it were, "a house divided against 
itself," and before the season was half over the controlling 
"combine" of the Association gave the death blow to the 
future existence of that organization, by their open repudi- 
ation of the national agreement, and that proved to be the 
last straw on the camel's back. 

By the close of the season of 1891. the magnates of the 
National League found that some prompt and stringent 
measures of reform in the government of the fraternity 
had become essential to the future existence of the pro- 
fessional business at large. They had experienced the fact, 
that year, that what with the player's revolt of 1890 and 



8 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

the repudiation of the national agreement by the American 
Association in 1S91, the patrons of professional ball playing 
had become so disgusted with the then existing condition 
of things in the professional base ball world, that they 
deserted the club grounds by thousands, with the costly 
result of bankrupting the majority of the clubs of the two 
major organizations, not to mention the ruining of the 
financial prospects of all of the minor leagues of the period. 
Then it was that, in 1S92, the League magnates made the 
bold reformatory move to deliver professional ball players 
from the costly evils which had brought the clubs almost 
to death's door. Forgiving the errors of the past, the 
League clubs joined hands with the best clubs of the 
Association, and by a combination which cost the League 
clubs $150,000 to complete, they at once removed all of 
the costly rivalry caused by the old Association, and which 
had proved so damaging to the financial interests of the 
clubs of both organizations alike; and thus was inaugur- 
ated the grand Major League — a reconstructed National 
League — which now governs the whole professional base 
ball world. 

The inaugural year of the new League was necessarily 
an experimental year in every respect; and under the 
trying circumstances the new organization was subjected 
to, and especially the fact that it was burdened with the 
handicap in the form of the opposition it encountered at 
the hands of the large majority of the players and their 
so-called friends, the degree C)f success attained by the 
new League was a most agreeable surprise to the magnates 
of the twelve clubs of the League. But it was left for the 
second year of the new organization's existence for it to 
attain such a degree of financial success in its career as 
to fully insure its future permanent establishment as a 
foregone conclusion. The one single fact that in 1893 the 
League's heavy indebtedness — a total of $140,000 — was 
entirely paid off from the proceeds of the two seasons of 
its existence, proved conclusively that the reform govern- 
ment inaugurated in 1S92 had, in two years of practical 
existence, brought about a complete restoration of public 
confidence in the integrity of the League's methods, and the 
result was a grand triumph for the League magnates of 1S93. 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP CAMPAIGN OF 1893. 

THE season's club RECORDS. 

The championship season of 1S93 was, in one respect, the 
most successful season experienced since the decade of th^ 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 9 

nineties set in ; and that was, in regard to its financial 
results ; which left the majority of its clubs with a surplus 
in hand wherewith to begin business again in 1894, In fact, 
the aggregate attendance at the League games in 1893. 
which led to this financial prosperity, beat the record of any 
previous season known to League history. But in the 
important matter of the evenness of the annual pennant 
race, the outcome of the championship campaign of 1893 was 
far from being satisfactory ; inasmuch as the question as to 
which club would win the race was virtually settled a 
month and more before the close of the season. The even- 
ness of a pennant race is a very potent factor in promoting 
the financial success of each year's championship campaign; 
a fact which the majority of the League magnates do not 
appear to fully realize, or they would make greater sacrifices 
than they do to even up the playing strength of their 
respective club teams each year. In regard to this vital 
question of making the competing teams each season as 
even in playing strength as possible, it is certainly a subject 
meriting the earnest attention of the League government, 
if only as a matter of business policy. Up to the time of 
the organization of the existing League, not the slightest 
effort was made by the leading clubs under the joint gov- 
ernment of the old League and Association, to even up 
their teams each year, with the views of insuring a closely 
contested pennant race ; the rule then being for each club 
to be run on the principle of each one for itself and the 
devil take the hindmost. Of course, this short-sighted policy 
was in direct and costly conflict with the running of the 
clubs on true business principles, the working motto of 
which system is '' All for one and one for ally 

While it is, of course, almost an impossibility to make the 
competing club teams in each season's campaign equal in 
playing strength, especially in regard to the advantages of 
their possession of competent managers and able field cap- 
tains, still it is possible to even up the ranks of each club's 
team to the point of a more equal condition of relative play- 
ing strength than has hitherto been done. That this even- 
ing-up poHcy is the true one, in a business point of view, 
goes without saying ; inasmuch as the more closely contested 
the pennant race of each season is, from start to finish, the 
greater the attraction and, in consequence, the larger the 
public patronage. In this connection it has been suggested 
that a sort of lottery plan of player-distribution be adopted 
in order to even up the teams; but any such plan of select- 
ing players as this would fail, because of the impossibility 



lO SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

of making teams, selected by lot, work harmoriously 
together, for, under such circumstances, they would be little 
else than mere " picked nines" and not nines for team work 
together. 

But something should be done by the League magnates 
to equalize the playing strength of the twelve club teams 
of the League each season, as on that depends largely the 
financial prosperity of the campaign each year. 

THE CIIAMPION CLUB'S RECORD FOR 1893. 

The Boston club began the championship campaign in 
New York ov. April 28th, in a series of three games with the 
New York club, rain preventing the games scheduled in the 
east for April 27th. They won the first game on the 28th, 
but lost the second on the 29th, and then made an even 
start in their first series. They closed the brief April cam- 
paign on the 30th of that month with a percentage of vic- 
tories of .500, Cleveland holding the lead in the race at that 
date, without a defeat being charged to them ; with St. 
Louis and Washington tied for second position, and with 
Baltimore in fourth place; all the other clubs — including the 
Boston — except Louisville and Pittsburgh, being tied for 
fifth'position witha percentage of .500 each, Louisville being 
eleventh with .333 and Pittsburgh the tail ender without the 
credit of a single victory. Early in May the Boston got 
am©ng the six leaders, and by the end of the month they 
stood third in the race, with a percentage of victories of .5S6 
to their credit, Pittsburgh leading with the figures of .667, 
while Brooklyn occupied second place with .630, the differ- 
ence at this time— May 31st — in percentage points, between 
the leading club and the tail ender, being no less than .500 
points, showing a very one-sided race at the very outset. 
Early in June the Boston club gf^t into second position in 
the race, but during the second week of that month they 
fell off badly, they being forced back to fourth place by the 
9th of June, after which they rallied well, and by the end of 
the June campaign they again had pulled up to a tie with 
the leaders, they having a percentage of .654 on the 30th of 
June, and on that day tliey were tied with the Philadelphia 
and Brooklyn clubs for first position. 

The Bostons opened the July campaign as occupants of 
first place in the race, theirpercentage figures on July ist 
being .660, with the Philadelphia and Brooklyn clubs tied 
for second place with .642 each. On July 8th' the Bostons 
lost the lead, they being replaced by the Phillies; but they 
retained second place, Brooklyn retiring to third position ; 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 11 

the Phillies leading with .651 on July 13th, while the Bos- 
tons stood at .635, and the Brooklynsat .565, The Bostons 
retained second place up to July 27th, when they went to 
the front with a percentage of .649 to their credit, the PhilHes 
being second with .640 and Pittsburgh third with .579, the 
Brooklyns having fallen off badly through drunkenness in 
their ranks. Boston kept in the van to the end of the July 
campaign, they ending the month with their percentage 
figures at .667, followed by the Phillies and the Pittburghs. 
By this time it had almost become a foregone conclusion 
that the Bostons would win the pennant, and it became a 
surety by the 19th of August, on. which date the Bostons' 
percentage figures reach .701, the Pittsburghs, in the 
interim, having jumped into second place in consequence of 
the bad tumble made by the Phillies, who, about this time, 
lost the services of tneir noted out-fielder and crack base 
runner, Hamilton, who was taken seriously ill. The Bostons 
ended the August campaign as virtual champions, August 
31st seeing them still in the van with a percentage of .698 
to Pittsburgh's .594, and the Phillies' .581 ; Cleveland, New 
York and Brooklyn being the other three of the six leaders. 
The Boston club touched the highest point of their season 
in percentage figures on September nth, when they stood 
at .717 to Pittsburgh's. 602 and Philadelphia's. 5S8; New York 
and Brooklyn at this time struggling hard to beat each 
other out in the race. After then the Boston team played 
rather carelessly, and they fell off in their work to such an 
extent that on the 23d of September they had lowered their 
percentage figures down to .669, and finally finished the 
September campaign with a percentage of but .662, the 
Pittsburghs being second with .628 and Cleveland third 
with .570, the Phillies having taken another tumble, to fourth 
place, with but. 558 to their credit, New York being fifth 
with .515. Cincinnati and Brooklyn tied for sixth place at 
.508, the former having the best of it through their leading 
Brooklyn by eight victories to four in their series together. 
Drunkenness by a minority of the champion team caused 
trouble in the Boston team in September, and the offenders 
were penalized for their escapade. 

A PERCENTAGE RECORD. 

The campaign of 1893 was marked by a very uneven race, 

the difference in the percentage points between the leading 

'club and the tail ender at the finish standing at .359, 

there being no less than six better contested pennant races 

in the League record between 1881 and 1893, as will be 



12 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

seen by the appended table, showing the difference in per- 
centage points each year between the leading club and the 
tail enders. 



YEARS. 

1881 


POINTS OF 
DIFFEKKNCE. 


YEAHS. 

ISsS 


POINTS OF 

DIFFERKNCE. 

303 


1«82 


441. 




. isKy 


3"J8 


1883 




isyo 


49') 


1884 

1885 . . , , 


400. 

442. 

493. 




1891 

. 1.S9-J 


223 

367 


1886 




1893 


359 


1887 


333. 









THE CHAMPION CLUB S RECORD. 

The complete record of the Boston champions for 1893 is 
given below in detail, the first record showing the figures 
of their single club victories and defeats, together with their 
drawn games: 



1893. 
Boston vs. 



Victories , . . . 

Defeats 

(ianies played 
Drawn ganies 



i 








B 


















1 


1 




i 

S 


■f 


«• 

'« 


s 


"t 


a 


1 


s 


> 
.2 


i 


JS 


0) 


^ 


rt 




b 


.~ 


^ 


— 


— 


■ 


- 1 




c^ 


i5 


■^ 


cc 


^ j 


H 


— 


^' 


'-' 


^ 


J} 


""1 


Eh 


8 


8 


8 


10 


7' 


41 


4 


7 


6 


8 


10 


10 


45 


4 


4 


4 


2 


5i 


19 


6 


5 


6 


3 


2 


2 


24 


12 


12 


12 


12 


o| 


601 


10 


12 


12 


11 


12 


121 


69 














lel 


1 1 








1 





0! 


2 



43 

129 

2 



The above table shows that the Boston club's percentage 
of victories against their Eastern adversaries was .6S0, 
while as against the Western clubs their percentage was 
but. 652. The champions won no less than ten games out 
of the twelve played with the Baltimore, St. Louis and 
Louisville clubs, and they won eight out of twelve with the 
Philadelphia, New York, Brooklyn and Chicago clubs; but 
with the Clevelands they won but seven out of the twelve, 
and, singularly, they were no more successful with the tail 
end Washingtons than with the club third in the race ; while 
the Pittsburghs got the best of them by six victories out of 
the eleven games they played with the Bostons, one being 
drawn and another scheduled game not played. The Bos- 
tons drawn games were their 7 innings game in August 
with the Pittsburghs and their 5 innings game with the 
Chicagoes in September. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 13 

The record of the series with each club is as follows: 



Boston vs. 



Series won 

Series lost 

Series tied 

Series unfluislied 



cS 








-: 
















. ! 


.a 
p. 


M 


c 


t 







S-i 


(1; 


■^ 




rr 


a.' 


1 


53 





Ad 




s 


n 


VI 


p 


» 


;3 



r/1 


tn 






\j, 


"; 




M 









h-5 






s 




"S 


^ 





t; 


OJ 


a 











Oh 


y-* 


m 


P5 


H 


fL, 


:>) 





cJ 


03 


k4 


H 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


5 





1 





1 


1 


1 


4 

































































1 











1 




















1 








1 








2 



The champions won all of their series with the eastern 
teams, but only four out of six with the western, as they 
had to be content with a tie series with the Cincinnati club, 
and only won four out of the ten played with the Pitts- 
burghs. This latter series cannot be charged as lost, as the 
Bostons had the chance left them to tie the score. When a 
series is not won by the winning of 7 out of 12, if it be left 
unfinished no lost series can be charged. Two series were 
left unfinished and one was tied, the champions winning 
nine out of the eleven played, something no other club did. 

The table showing the victories and defeats of the cham- 
pions, in the form of "shut outs" or "Chicago" games, 
together with that of the games won and lost by a single run, 
is as follows : 



Boston v?. 



Chicago victories 
Cliicago defeats.. 
Won by one run . . 
Lost by one run . . 



A 








d 
















i 


B 

1 





a 



B 


a 


» 


t 

5 


a 


a 


d 







a" 


& 




'i3 


■ji 


oi 




a> 




a 





hJ 


■P 


a 


ss 


0) 




crl 


fei 

















IIh 


>^ 


W 


£3 




Ch 











«j 


h-J 


H 


1 














1 











1 








1 

















" 


2 





1 


1 





1 


5 


1 





1 


1 


•2 


^ 





2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


9 








2 





1 


3l 


1 


2 


1 


2 








6 



The champions, it will be seen, were not very successful 
in "Chicagoing" their opponents, as they only won two 
games in that way, while they lost five, the Pittsburghs 
twice shutting them out by 13 to o and 8 to o, while the 
Cincinnati team did the trick by 6 to o, the Chicagoes by 3 
to o, and the Louisvilles by 3 to o, the champions whipping 
the Chicagoes by 7 to o and the Phillies by 4 to o. 

The Boston team won no less than 19 games by a single 
run and lost 12 by one run, the majority of victories and 



14 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



defeats, in each case, being in their games with the 
western teams. 

The record showing the games won and lost by single 
and double figure scores is as follows: 



Boston \s. 



p 
















3 


1 


i 


& 



' > ~ ~^ -f. 



s'^ll -1^ 



Sin<rle liy me victories I 6 

.Single figure defeats I 3 

Double figure victories I 2 

Double Mgure defeats 1 



f 


C 


rf 


.-i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




/u 


— 






^r- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


/. 


3 


6 


6 


5 


|25 


3 


4 


6 


5 


6 


1 


3 


1 


2 


;io 


4 


3 


5 


4 





5 


2 


5 


2 


16 


1 


3 





3 


4 


W 


1 


1 


3' 


9 


2 


2 


1 





2 



3 127 52 

7i'l8'34 

I'l 8IIT 



In their record of victories won by single figure scores 
compared to those won by double figures, it will be seen 
that the totals were 52 to 34 in favor of single figure scores, 
this fact showing pretty conclusively that the champions 
had to face either some very effective pitching or to bat 
against some splendid field support of the "batteries" 
opposed to them. 

The record of their victories and defeats at home and 
abroad presents the following interesting figures: 



Boston vs. 



Home victories .. 

Home -defeats 

Victories abroad. 
Defeats ji broad.. 



4 

1 

X 

2 
1 

6 
3 


~6 

2 
4 


_. 

B 

~l 

6 
1 


4 

2 




3 

3] 
4' 
2 


20! 
1 7 
21 1 
12 


be 

3 
1 

1 
Ft 


■0 

1 

4 
2 
3 
3 


3 
3 
3 

3 


5 

1 
3 
3 


6 

4 
2 


■5 

6 

4 
2 


1 

7 
18 
18 


1 

i 
47 

14 
39 
30 



The above table shows that the champions won a total of 
67 games on their home field, and a total of 60 games on 
fields abroad; their defeats on home grounds bemg but 21, 
while those they sustained on fields abroad numbered 42. 
Neither the New York, Baltimore, St. Louis or Louisville 
clubs were able to win a game from the champions at Boston ; 
while the Phillies, the Pittsburghs and the Chicagoes 
could each win but a single game from them in those cities; 
whereas the champions won six games out of their twelve 
on the south end grounds at Boston, with each of the New 
York, Baltimore, St. Louis and Louisville clubs, and six 
games with the Phillies on the latter's own field, while they 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



15 



similarly won five from Brooklyn at Eastern Park. At 
Pittsburgh the champions lost five of their ten games 
with the "Pirates," the Smoky City proving more fatal to 
them than any other League city in i3{)3. 

The record of the extra innings games played by the 
champions is as follows : 



Boston ts. 


.2 

a 

-1 













1 


6 

1 
1 







1 





w 

B 

G 
1 


1 





1 
> 

3 
1 


3 

1 
"5 





.1 







1 





si 

% 







t 

1 
n 


5 


Extia innings, victories 


1 


Extra Innings, defeats 


1 





















It is a noteworthy fact that the champions did not win 
but one extra innings game, and that was with the Cleve- 
land team, their ten innings contests at Cleveland, Septem- 
ber 2oth, ending with a victory by 4 to 3, Nichols pitching 
against Young. They only lost one extra innings game, too, 
and that was with the Brooklyn club at Boston, on May 
19th, when the visitors won by 5 to 4 in a twelve innings 
contest, Stein then pitching against Stivetts. 

The record of the highest scores made in victories, and 
the lowest in defeats, together with the percentage of vic- 
tories made by the champions against the eleven opposing 
clubs in the campaign, ends the record of the work done on 
the field by the Boston club in the pennant race of 1893: 





CS 








a 
















Boston vs. 






12-5 


1 

16-3 


a 
1 

13-6 


13-10 


-d 

1 

> 
17-7 


3S 

c 
a 

a 


8-7 


18-2 


P. 

1 
m 
18-3 


> 

1 

15-4 


1 


Higliestsc'r vies.. 


18-6 


18-2 


Lowest sc'r d'f'ts. 


4-7 


1-4 


4-5 


2-8 


5-7 


0-13 


2-7 


0-6 


0-3 


4-16 


0-3 


0-13 


Per cent, of vies. 


.667 


.667 


667 


.833 


.583 


.444 


.583 


.500 


.727 


.833 


.833 


.667 



The highest score made in any game with the eastern 
clubs was 18 to 6 against the Phillies at Philadelphia, on 
May 23d; and the highest against the western clubs was 18 
to 2 against the Chicagoes at Boston, May 29th. Their 
worst defeat sustained at the hands of ^.ny eastern team 
was that of i to 4 at New York on July 17th, when Baldwin 
pitched against Nichols ; while the worst recorded by west- 
ern clubs against the champions was by the Pittsburghs' 9 



i6 Spalding's official 

to lo at Pittsbuigh on July 6th, when Coyle pitched for the 
champions against Ehret and was badly punished. 

The highest percentage made by the champions against 
any opposing team was .833, which figures were scored 
against the Baltimore, St. Louis and Louisville clubs ; 
whilst the lowest percentage made by the Bostons was 
against the Pittsburghs, viz., .444. 

THE TEAM WORK OF THE BOSTONS. 

There is no questioning the fact that the Boston team led 
all their opponents in 1S93 in team work; that is, they 
excelled all the opposing teams in '' playing for the side," 
and that involves team work alike in the batteries of the 
club, in their fielding and above all in their batting and 
base running; and it was in the two latter specialties that 
they particularly led every other team in the J^eague. The 
absurd statement that it was this, that or the other single 
speciality which gave them the championship needs no 
refuting argument. It was the combination of headwork 
play in batting, base running and fielding which made 
them successful; their team including a quartette of brainy 
players in strategic skill which no other club equaled. 
John M. Ward saw their most telling points in this respect, 
and he candidly acknowledged their superiority in thorough 
team work. With this great advantage to back them up, 
the champions ef 1S93 could easily have defeated the best 
picked nine of mere home-pcvsition players selected from 
any other of the eleven League clubs, inasmuch as " picked 
nines" invariably lack the great essential of "playing for 
the side," the majority of such nines being record players, 
and record playing teams never win pennant races. Of 
course, good management and able captaining aided in the 
success of the team. 

THE PITTSBURGH CLUli's RECORD. 

The Pittsburgh club opened its championship campaign 
in 1893 rather inauspiciously, inasmuch as its team failed 
to win a single game in April, and at the close of the month 
it occupied the tail end position in the race, audit remained 
there until May 3d, when the team jumped out of the last 
ditch and began to mount to the head of the second division 
clubs, and by the 8th of May left that division for the 
season ; and, moreover, before the May campaign ended. 
Pittsburgh got to the head of the six leaders, and on May 
31st led in the race by a percentage of victories of .667, 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 1 7 

Brooklyn being then second and Boston third on that date. 
The club retained its lead up to June 12th, when the Brook- 
lyn team went to the front with a percentage of .622 to 
Boston's .615 and Pittsburgh's .595, the " Pirates" — not of 
Penzance, but of Pittsburgh — being forced back to third 
place in the race at that date. The club then began to lose 
more ground, and by the 23d of June it had got down to fifth 
place, where it remained to the end of the June campaign, 
the position of the six leaders on June 30th showing the 
Phillies, Boston and Brooklyn clubs tied for first place, each 
with a percentage of victories of .654, while the Clevc- 
lands stood fourth with .553 and the Pittsburghs fifth 
with .491, the New Yorks occupying sixth place with 
.472. The early part of the July campaign saw the Pitts- 
burghs still in fifth position in the race, but on the 12th 
of July they began to rally for the lead, and by the 24th of 
that month they had worked up to third place, a position 
the club retained up to the end of the July campaign, at 
which time the Bostons held the lead with .667 in percentage 
points, the Phillies being second with . 620 and the Pittsburghs 
third with .582, the next three being respectively Cleveland, 
Brooklyn and Cincinnati. By this time the championship 
had virtually been secured by the Bostons and the further 
interest in the race centered upon the struggle for second 
place, and it was by this time a foregone conclusi(jn that 
but three clubs other than the Bostons were in the race as 
far as the first three positions were concerned, and these 
three were the Phillies, the Pittsburghs and the Clevelands. 
The whole interest in the August campaign, therefore, 
centred in the fight between this trio. By the 15th of 
August the Pittsburghs had worked tip to second position, 
leaving the Phillies third; but by the T7th of the month, the 
Clevelands had overhauled the Phillies and taken their 
place. Then it was that the Philadelphians made a spurt 
to recover their lost ground, but injuries to some of their 
players, after they had got back to third place, enabled 
Cleveland to replace them in that position for a while ; but 
the closing day of the August campaign saw the Quakers 
once more in third place, the percentage figures on August 
31st showing the Pittsburghs second with .594, the Phillies 
third with .581 and the Clevelands fourth with .544; New 
York and Brooklyn being fifth and sixth respectively. 

Now came the last monthly campaign of the season, that 

• of September, and with the eastern teams due to play in 

the West, Pittsburgh and Cleveland stock began to improve 



i8 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



in the market, the Pirates actually thinking they had a 
chance to head the Bostons, though on September 2d Bos- 
ton led by .701 in percentage figures to Pittsburgh's .593. 
The Phillies fought hard and under handicapping circum- 
stances to retain third position during September, but by 
the 27th of that month the Clevelands supplanted them 
and retained the place from that date to the finish, the 
Pittsburghs having to be content \:ith second place, despite 
the fact that the champions made a bad tumble in percent- 
age figures during the latter part of the month. Here is 
the complete record of the Pittsburgh club for 1893: 

















i2 








c 




PirrsBiRGn vs. 


a 

01 


a 
a 

a 


1 


1 


1 

a 




a 



t 
ic 




>> 



1 
•3 


= 
ci 







c 


u 





OQ 


^ 


P 


flH 


y. 


" 


w 


^ 


H 


Victories 


3 
9 


9 
3 


9 
3 


9 
3 


8 
4 


6 
4 


T 


8 
4 


4 

8 


11 
1 


9 
2 


81 


Defeats 


48 


Games played 


12 


12 


12 


12 


li 


10 


12 


12 


12 


12 


11 


129 


Drawn games 

















1 





1 











2 


Series won 





1 


1 


1 


1 








1 





1 


1 


7 


Series lost 


1 

























1 


1 









1 

u 














3 


Series tied 





Series imflnished.. 


1 


"Cliicapo" vict's.. 





1 





1 


1 


2 





1 





1 


1 


8 


"Cliicago'' defeats. 




















1 














1 


Won by one run.. 


2 


1 


4 


2 


1 


1 


2 


4 








2 


19 


Lost 1)V one run. . . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 





1 


1 


2 








9 


Siugle'flgure vict's 


2 


8 


6 


6 


4 


4 


3 


7 


2 


4 


4 


50 


Single ligure def'ts 


4 


3 


2 


2 


1 


3 


4 


3 


6 





1 


29 


Doui)leH -are vict's 


1 


1 


3 


3 


4 


2 


2 


1 


2 


7 


5 


31 


Double ligure defts 


5 





1 


1 


3 


1 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


19 


Home victories 


•2 


4 


5 


6 


4 


5 


4 


5 


2 


8 


8 


53 


Home defeat-s 


4 


2 


1 





4 


1 


2 


1 


4 








19 


Victories abroad.. 


1 


5 


4 


3 


4 


1 


1 


3 


2 


8 


1 


'28 


Defeats abroad.... 


5 


1 


2 


3 





3 


5 


3 


4 


1 


2 


29 


Extra inn's vict's . 





1 


1 





1 





1 











1 


5 


Kxtr.i inn's dtf'ts . 





1 





1 








1 





1 








4 


Higrliest score vies. 


10-6 


11-4 


17-10 


25-2 


14-3 


13-0 


11-6 


12-:. 


13-2 


14-7 


19-0 


25-2 


Lowest .score riefts 


1-3 


1-4 


2-3 


4-5 


3-14 


3-7 


0-3 


2-4 


1-2 


5-12 


1-3 


0-3 


ivr cent, of vict's. 


.250 


.750 


.750 


,750 


.667 


.600 


.417 


.667 


.3.33 


.917 


.818 


.628 



THE CLEVELAND CLUB S RECORD. 



The Cleveland club opened its championship season of 1S93 
at Pittsburgh, on April 27th, and the visitors signalized the 
event with a noteworthy victory over the home team, and 
they did it again the next day, and thereby the two clubs 



BASE BALL GUIDE. I9 

made a special record in their April campaign, as the Cleve- 
lands did not lose a game that month and the Pittsburghs 
did not win one. The former's percentage of victories on 
April 30th being .1,000 and the latter' s .000, Cleveland lead- 
ing at the end of the brief opening month's campaign, with 
St. Louis second, Washington third, respectively, with per- 
centages of .666, with Boston, Philadelphia, New York, 
Brooklyn, Cincinnati and Chicago standing a tie for fourth 
place with the percentage figures of .500 each, while Balti- 
more and Louisville stood next with .333 each and Pitts- 
burgh the tail ender without a victory to its credit. The 
Cleveland club opened the May c^impaign with the lead in 
the race, and it maintained that position up to May nth, 
when the St. Louis team temporarily jumped to the front, 
and held the place from that date until May i6th, when the 
Clevelands got back in that position again, and retained the 
lead up to May 27th, when Pittsburgh took its turn in lead- 
ing the race, the Clevelands taking a tumble during the 
last week of the May campaign, as their percentage figures 
on May 31st stood at .571, Pittsburgh, Brooklyn and Bos- 
ton then preceding them. In June the Clevelands tried 
hard to recover their lost ground, but failed; in fact on 
June 1 6th they were temporarily drawn into the ranks of 
the second division and remained there a week. By the 
20th of June, however, they got back to fifth place in the 
race, and they ended the June campaign in fourth position 
and ahead of Pittsburgh, the Boston, Philadelphia and 
Brooklyn clubs being at that date tied for first place. 

During July the Clevelands got back to third place for a 
week, but they had to close that month's campaign in 
fourth position, with a percentage of .575, preceded by Bos- 
ton, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, the three leaders at that 
date, the latter having rallied well. 

It was not until the middle of the August campaign that 
the Clevelands could improve their position ; indeed they 
had to fight hard to maintam fourth place in the race ; but 
on August 17th they got back to third place, and held it for 
a week, only, however, to close the month's campaign in 
fourth position. By hard fighting they managed to replace 
Philadelphia by September 27th and finally ended the season 
occupants of third position, with Boston and Pittsburgh in 
advance of them, respectively, with the percentage figures 
of .662 and .628, Cleveland's figures being. 578, Philadelphia, 
New York and Cincinnati following in order, Brooklyn 
being tied with the latter for sixth place. Here is the Cleve- 
land club's record in full: 



20 




SPALDING 


S OFFICIAL 










Cleveland vs. 




1 


-3 


o 


1 


1 


% 
« 

1 


c 




1 


1 

a 


^ 








6 


s 


1 




V 

52; 


1 








Victories 


9 
3 
12 


5 

6 

11 


8 

4 

12 


9 
3 
12 


6 
3 
9 


5 

7 

12 


3 

9 

12 


6 

6 

12 


7 
5 
12 


4 

8 

12 


11 

1 

12 


73 


Defeats 


55 


Gaines played.... 


128 


Drawn games 


























1 








1 


Series won 


1 





1 


1 














1 





1 


5 


Series lost 

















1 


1 








1 





3 


Series tiert 























1 











1 


Series unfinished. 





1 








1 




















2 


"Chicafro" vict's. 


























1 





1 


2 


"Chicago'' defts. 





1 














2 


1 











4 


Won by one run.. 


1 


2 


1 


4 





2 


1 


3 





1 


1 


16 


Lost by one run.. 


2 


1 





2 





2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


14 


Single'Jlg. vict's.. 


4 


2 


6 


7 


3 


3 





6 


3 


1 


6 


41 


Single lig. defts.. 


2 


5 


2 


3 


1 


4 


5 


3 


4 


6 


1 


36 


Double tig. vict's. 


5 


3 


2 


2 


3 


2 


3 





4 


3 


5 


32 


Double lig. defts. 


1 


1 


2 





2 


3 


4 


3 


1 


2 





19 


Home victories. . . 


5 


4 


5 


4 


4 


3 


3 


4 


g 


1 


9 


47 


Home defeats.... 


1 


2 


1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


5 





22 


Yiet^ries abroad. 


4 


1 


3 


5 


2 


2 





2 


2 


3 


2 


26 


Defeats abroad... 


2 


4 


3 


1 


1 


4 


6 


4 


4 


3 


1 


33 


Extra inn's vicf s. 




















1 


1 


1 





1 


4 


Extra inn's defts 

















1 

















1 


High't score vict's 


17-4 


21-4 


16-S 


19-3 


15-9 


13-11 


13-6 


9-7 


16-3 


15-11 


13-7 


21-4 


Low't .score defts 


5-6 


0-2 


3-5 


2-3 

t 


2-4 


3-5 


0-7 


0-2 


2-4 


1-4 


,.4 


0-7 


Per cent, of vict's. 


^ 


1.455 


1.687 


1.750 


.667 


.417 


.250 


.500 


.583 


.333 


.917 


^0 



THE PHILADELPHIA CLUB S RECORD. 

The record of the Philadelphia club in 1893 was marked 
by an exceptional chapter of accidents in the club's ranks, 
such as frequently upset the sanguine expectations of the 
best of managers. But there is one thing which justice 
requires to be recorded iti this connection, and that is, 
that it certainly was not Manager Harry Wright's fault that 
his club team did not win the pennant. The club opened 
its championship season April 28th with a victory, and 
ended the April campaign with an even score of games with 
its Brooklyn rival. Then came its first stroke of ill luck in 
injuries to important players, and during the first part of 
the May campaign the Phillies had to occupy a position in 
the ranks of the second division. By May 17th, however, 
the club got back among the six leaders in the race, and 
they ended the May campaign in fifth place, with a percent- 
age of victories of .556, Pittsburgh then leading with .667. 

The June campaign saw the Phillies rally in good style, 
and by the 17th of that month they had tied Brooklyn — 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



then in the van — and on May 19th they took first place in 
the race for the first time, and on June 30th they were still 
in the van, with a percentage of victories to their credit of 
.654, the Boston and Brooklyn clubs being close on their 
heels. * The first part of July they fell to second place for a 
week, but regained the lead on July loth, when their per- 
centage figures stood at .667 to Boston's .633 and Brooklyn's 
.576. They remained in the van up to July 27th, when the 
Bostons got to the front by .649 to the Phillies' .640. In the 
meantime the Pittsburghs had superseded Brooklyn, the 
latter taking a tumble through Richardson's costly escap- 
ade, the Phillies ending the July campaign in second posi- 
tion, with the promise good for their, at least, holding that 
place to the finish. 



Philadelphia vs. 


fl 





% 

iA 


i 

a 


p 

fcC 

1 


i 




:3 

a 
1 


'B. 


I 


03 

.2 

3 



1 




M 


•/^ 


m 


CP 


0. 


3 


5 





tn 


^ 


H 


Victories 


4 

8 


5 

7 


5 
6 


7 
5 


8 
4 


7 
5 


I 


9 

1 


6 
6 


4 

8 


8 
4 


72 


Defeats 


57 


Games played 


12 


VI 


11 


12 


12 


12 


12 


10 


12 


12 


12 


129 


Drawn games 





1 


1 














1 





1 





4 


Series won 











1 


1 


1 


1 


1 








1 


6 


Ji'erieslost 


1 


1 























1 





3 


Series tied 


























1 








1 


Series unflni^lied. . 








1 


























1 


Ciiicago victories . 

















1 


2 





1 








4 


Chicago defeats... 


1 
































1 


Won by one run. . . 








1 








1 


2 


4 





2 


2 


12 


Lost by one run... 


1 





3 




1 


2 


1 





2 


6 


1 


18 


Single figure vict's 


3 


1 


3 




1 


4 


5 


5 


4 


2 


5 


37 


Single figure def'ts 


6 


1 


4 




1 


3 





1 


3 


§ 


4 


35 


Double figure Vic's. 


1 


4 


2 




7 


3 


4 


4 


2 


2 


3 


35 


Double figure de'fs 


2 


6 


2 




3 


2 


3 





3 








22 


Home victories.... 


3 


4 


3 




7 


5 


6 


5 


1 


1 


4 


44 


Home defeats 


6 


2 


2 




2 


1 





1 


2 


5 


2 


24 


Victories abroad . . 


1 


1 


2 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


3 


4 


28 


Defeats abroad 




5 


4 




2 


4 


3 





4 


3 


2 


33 


Extra inns, vict's. . 













1 


1 





2 








2 


7 


Extra inns, def'ts . 





1 


1 




1 


1 


1 





1 


1 





8 


Highest score vies. 


13-7 


18-6 


16-7 


17-3 


22-7 


18-5 


16-6 


15-14 


16-1 


17-8 


16-4 


22-7 


Lowest score def'ts 


4 


5-9 


1-3 


2-8 


1-7 


3-7 


3-10 


1-7 


3-6 


1-4 


2-5 


0-4 


Per cent, of vict's. 


.333 


.417 


.485 


.583 


.667 


.583 


.750 


.900 


.500 


.333 


667 


.558 



In August, however, the club struck a snag in the loss' of 
Hamilton's valuable services, as also in the additional dis- 
abling of Allen, and before the August campaign had ended 
the Phillies had fallen to fourth place, but they managed 
to end the month in third position. During the September 



22 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

campaign they had to face the Westerners on the latter's 
own fields, and though they fought hard they had work to 
do to retain third position, but they did it up to September 
27th, when the Clevelands ousted them out of third place 
and sent them to fourth position, in which place they ended 
the season, with a percentage of .558 to Boston's .667, the 
team making a good fight under disheartening circum- 
stances. The club's complete record for 1S93 appears on 
page 21. 

THE xNEW YORK CLUB's RECORD. 

The season of 1893 was the most successful one the New 
York club had had since 1SS9, alike as regards the success 
of the club's team and its management, and the financial 
results of the season. They did not win the pennant, to be 
sure, but they beat out their Brooklyn rival in the race, and 
that was a result they regarded as next to winning the pen- 
nant. But it was the return of the old patronage of 
i§8^ that the New York officials were most rejoiced at; the 
season, in this respect, being the most gratifying to the club 
of any for the past four years, as it enabled them to pay 
off a burden of indebtedness, incurred during the revolu- 
tionj*ry years of 1S90 and 1S91, which had handicapped the 
club very badly. The return of John M. Ward to the club 
this year as manager as well as captain, of course, had its 
reviving elTect on the club's local prospects; besides which 
the introduction ot new players in its ranks helped consid- 
erably in bringing about the welcome change in its patron- 
age. 

The club opened its season of 1893 with even figures in 
won games with the Boston club, and the remarkable attend- 
ance at the opening game on April 28th was greatly encour- 
aging to the club after the costly experience, in loss of pat- 
ronage, of the previous three years. Closing the brief April 
campaign on an even footing with the Boston champions, 
the New Yorkers started in May with favorable prospects, 
and they kept among the six leaders during the first part 
of the month, but after the 9th of May the Giants were 
driven into the second division ranks, where they remained 
imtil the end of the May campaign, one or two experiments 
in retaining fading stars in their team proving costly, the 
end of the campaign leaving the club occupants of the ninth 
place in the race, while their old time rivals of Brooklyn 
stood well up in the van and in second position, and ahead 
of both Boston and Philadelphia. The June campaign saw 
the Giants rally well, and by June 13th they were back in 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



23 



the first division again, and on June 30th they stood sixth 
in the race with a percentage of victories of .472, Boston, 
Brooklyn and Philadelphia being a tie at .654 for first place. 
During the July campaign the Giants lost considerable 
ground, their trip West proving disastrous, and the result 
was that on July srstthey stood in percentage figures at 
.468 only, and then they occupied the eighth place in the 
race. In August the Giants rallied, and by good work at 
home they got back among the six leaders, and took the lead 



New York vs. 


d 


1 





3 


1 

a 

i 






•*3 

1 


s 


.25 
1 


0' 

.1 

s 



1 . 




w 


Ph 


M 


pq 


Cu 


5 


G 





02 


^q 


H 


Victories 


4 

8 


7 
6 


6 

6 


8 
6 


7 
5 


4 

8 


6 
6 


6 
6 


5 

7 


8 
4 


7 
5 


68 


Defeats 


64 


Games played 


12 


,12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


132 


Drawn games 





1 











1 





1 








1 


4 


Series won 



1 





1 







1 



1 





1 








1 







1 






1 





1 




1 






1 





5 


Series lost 


3 


Series tied 


3 


Series unfinished . . 





"Chicago" vict'ries 




















1 


1 


2 


1 





5 


"Chicago "defeats. 








2 








1 














1 


4 


Won by one run.... 








1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


3 


1 





3 


14 


Lost by one run 








3 


2 





4 


3 


2 


2 


2 





18 


Single fig. victories 


1 


1 


4 


6 


4 


3 


3 


4 


2 


6 


4 


38 


Single fig. defeats. . 


3 


1 


5 


4 


3 


7 


6 


5 


5 


3 


5 


47 


Double fig. victories 


3 


c 


2 


2 


3 


1 


3 


2 


3 


2 


3 


30 


Double fig. defeats. 


5 


4 


1 





2 


2 





1 


2 


1 





18 


Home victories .... 


4 


5 


5 


5 


6 


3 


4 


2 


3 


5 


5 


47 


Home defeats 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


1 


1 


19 


Victories abroad... 





2 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


4 


2 


3 


2 


21 


Defeats abroad .... 


6 


4 


5 


3 


3 


2 


4 


3 


4 


3 


4 


41 


Highest score vies. . 


18 


15 


13 


16 


18 








1 








2 


4 


Lowest score def'ts. 


1 


2 





1 


1 





1 





2 


1 





4 


Extra inn. victories 





1 











11 


13 


11 


17 


14 


23 


23 


Extra inn. defeats. . 




















2 


2 


2 


1 








Percent, of vict'ries 


.333 .5831 


.560 


.667 


.583 


.429 


.500' 


500! 


4I7I 


.607 


583 


.515 



of Brooklyn, a i-esult which was not anticipated in July. 
But the Brooklyn team met with its old costly experience 
in 1893, asithad done in every previous year of the club's 
existence, and that was the loss of position in the race, con- 
sequent upon drunkenness in the team's ranks, and this it 
w^as, and this only, which lost the club its position among 
the three leaders. It was a close fight between Brooklyn 
aiid New York during August for the lead over each other, 
but the Giants closed that month's campaign as occupants 
of fifth position with the percentage figures of .533, while 



24 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

Brooklyn had to be content with sixth place with the figures 
of .514. The September campaign did not change the rela- 
tive position of the two clubs, and the end ot the season 
saw New York still in fifth place in the race, with a percent- 
age of 515, while the Brooklyn and Cincinnati clubs were 
tied at .508 for sixth position, the Cincinnatis having the 
best of the record from having defeated Brooklyn in eight 
games out of their series of twelve games together. The 
New York club's record complete for 1S93 appears on page 
23. 

THE CINCINxNATI CLUB S RECORD. 

The Cincinnati club opened its championship season of 
1893 on April 27th, at Cinci^2.naJLi^with a noteworthy victory 
over Anson's so-called Chicago "colts," by the one-sided 
score of 10 to i, Anson retaliating with an offsetting defeat 
the next day by the score of 11 to i, two results which dis- 
played the glorious uncertainty of the game in striking 
colors. In the third round, however, which occurred on 
April 2gth, Comisky knocked AnFonout with the " Chicago" 
score of 5 to o, but the two teams ended the April campaign 
on the 30th with an even score of games of 2 to 2, so neither 
of the veterans could claim any special honor at the outset 
of the season, each closing the month with a percentage of 
victories of .500, the Eastern teams of Boston, New York, 
Brooklyn and Philadelphia having the same percentage of 
games, all these six clubs being tied for fifth place, Cleve- 
land, St. Louis and Washington leading them in the race, 
while Baltimore, Louisville and Pittsburgh brought up the 
rear, the latter ending the month without a victory to their 
credit. 

Early in May the Cincinnatis reached the highest position 
in the race that they occupied during the whole season, 
they standing third on May 8th with the percentage figures 
of .600; Cleveland and St. Louis then occupying first and 
second places. But the Cincinnatis then fell off badly, and 
on May 31st they stood seventh in the race, with but .467. 
In June they got down as low as tenth place ns-i; h a percent- 
age of only ,429, but in July they rallied, and re-entered the 
ranks of the six leaders, they standing sixth in the race on 
July i2th, with the comparatively good figures of .500, and 
they remained in the position with varying success to the 
close of the July campaign. In August they fell back to 
the second division, and on the 31st of that month were in 
seventh place with the pecentage of .490. During Septem- 
•ber they headed the second division, and ended the season 
on September 30th tied with Brooklyn for sixth position 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



they having the best of the record through winning a major- 
ity of their series of games with the Brooklyn club. 

A conspicuous fault of the Cincinnati management in 
1893 was too viuch experi'mentzng' with players, especially 
in regard to the batteries of the team. Nine pitchers alone 
were tried during 'the season, and the result was lack of 
team work in the battery force, while the changes made in 
the fielding teams of the club also had a demoralizing effect. 
If a club enters the arena new to. League experience, of 
course it becomes a necessity that its first campaign should 
be an experimental one ; but this was not the case with the 
Cincinnati club in 1893, and, therefore, most of the experi- 
mental work in making up the team should have been con- 
fined to the opening month of the season. To continue it 
up to the last month of the campaign was a costly blunder. 

Here is the Cincinnati's record in full: 

















.2 













Cincinnati ts. 


be 
u 


-a 

1 


0" 



.2 
'5 

3 


"> 

"3 





1 






a 
1 




s 


1 


1 






s 


6 


a 


m 


ij 


CQ 


s 


;^ 


fp 


PQ 


H 


Victories 


3 


6 


7 


7 


6 


6 


1 


6 


8 


8 


7 


65 


Defeats 


9 


5 


5 


5 


6 


6 


9 


6 


4 


4 


4 


63 


Games played. 


12 


11 


12 


12 


12 


12 


10 


12 


12 


12 


11 


128 


Drawu games. 











1 








1 


1 


e 








3 


Series won.... 








1 


1 














1 


1 


1 


5 


Series lost 


1 

















1 














2 


Series tied 














1 


1 





1 











3 


Series unfin'd. 





1 














1 











1 


3 


"Chicago" 


























victories .... 





1 


1 








1 








1 








4 


"Chicago " 


























defeats 


1 





1 














2 











4 


Won by one r'n 


1 


1 


2 


2 





1 





2 


3 


5 


5 


22 


Lost by one r'n 


1 


2 





2 


2 


2 


4 


2 


1 








16 


Single flg. vies. 


3 


5 


3 


6 


4 


5- 


1 


5 


7 


7 


6 


62 


Single fig. d'fts. 


8 


2 


3 


3 


4 


6 


5 


4 


3 


3 


2 


43 


Double figm-e 


























victories . . . 





1 


4 


1 


2 


1 





1 


1 


1 


1 


13 


Double figure 


























defeats 


1 


3 


2 


2 


2 





4 


2 


1 


1 


2 


20 


Home victories 


1 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 





3 


5 


5 


4 


37 


Home defeats . 


5 


1 


3 


2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


1 


1 


2 


29 


Victories abr'd 


2 


2 


7 


3 


2 


3 


1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


32 


Defeats abroad 


4 


4 


2 


3 


3 


3 


6 


2 


3 


3 


2 


34 


Ex. inns. vies. 


1 








2 























3 


Ex. inns, defts 


1 








1 








2 


1 





1 





6 


Highest score 


























victories.. . . 


8-3 


17-12 


14-5 


12-11 


30-12 


11-9 


7-1 


13-4 


11-4 


12-10 


10-4 


30-12 


Lowest score 


























defeats 


0-8 


2-3 


0-3 


2-3 


1-3 


1-6 


1-14 


0-2 


2-4 


2-3 


1-8 


0-8 


Per cent. Vies. 


.250 


.545 


.583 


.583 


.500 


.500 


.100 


.500 


.667 


.667 


.636 


.508 



26 Spalding's official 



THE BROOKLYN CLUB S RECORD. 

The season of 1S93 may be fairly recorded as the most 
successful one the Brooklyn club had experienced since it 
entered the National League. Not that iis team attained 
any special degree of success in the championship pennant 
race of the season, but that the financial results were the 
most satisfactory to the club of any since 1SS9. That the 
team did not attain the anticipated success in the champion- 
ship campaign was due, not so much to any special weak- 
ness in the management of its field forces, or in the playing 
strength of the team itself, but rather to the one conspicuous 
fault which had characterized the club's government since 
it entered the professional arena; and that one fault was 
the mistake Ji liberality of the ma7iagement in the condon- 
ing of drijiking offenses ifi the club ranks. From the time 
that the Brooklyn club ended its first season with champion- 
ship honors in a minor league organization, to the year it 
won the pennant of the American Association, it had been 
heavily handicapped by this conspicuous weakness. Time 
and again it would have won the pennant during the 
eighties but for drunkenness in its ranks. But in no year 
was the costly cause of defeat made more plainly apparent 
than in 1^93, as the following glance at the season's cam- 
paign of the club will fully show. The closing day of the 
opening month of the season, in AjDril, saw the Brooklyn 
club standing in the pennant race wiih the eastern clubs of 
Boston, New York and Philadelphia, and with the western 
clubs of Chicago and Cincinnati, with a percentage of 
victories for each of .500, Cleveland being in the race with 
a percentage of .1,000, and Pittsburgh at the tail end with 
.000. During the May campaign the Brooklyn club 
reached second position, with a percentage of victories on 
May 31st of. 630 to Pittsburgh's .667, Boston standing a c 
that time at .5S6, these being then the three leaders in the 
race. By the 12th of June Brooklyn held the leading 
position in the race, with a percentage of .622 to Boston's 
.615 and Pittsburgh's .595 ; the three clubs leading siill at 
that date. Before the end of the June campaign, however, 
the inherent weakness of the club team — intemperate habits 
among the minority — began to develop itseif, and the result 
was that by the end of the June campaign the club had 
fallen back to third place. During July the Richardson 
escapade took place, and by the end of that month the club 
had fallen to fifth position, and in August its rival, the 
New York club, superseded it, and before that month's 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



27 



campaign ended, its percentage figures got down to .484, 
and it had a hard struggle to retain sixth place in the race 
and all this was due entirely to dissipation in the club ranks 
indulged in by a small but prominent minority of its team 
players. It is not surprising therefore when, at the end of 
the September campaign, with the team tied with the Cin- 
cinnatis for sixth place, the club officials became tired of 
the plan of condoning drinking offenses, and proceeded, for 
the first time in its history, to make it costly for the offend- 
ers, and especially so for the leading culprit of the team. 
Good management, with the result of thorough team work 
in the club ranks, are, of course, essentials for pennant win- 
ning clubs; but above all stands teniperance in its ranks, 
and it is this lesson which the Brooklyn club learned at 
great financial cost in 1893. Will it profit by it in the near 
future? is the question. Messrs. Byrne and Abel say the 
club will do so, but 7ious verrons. 







.2 






n 
















Brooklyn vs. 


i 



'a 




t 


a 
2 



So 
_g 

1 


si 

3 


n 
> 


■5 

a 

1 





.2 
1 


CO 

.1 









CQ 


cu 


"^i 


CQ 


K 











ai 


^ 


E- 


Victories 


4 

8 


6 
5 


6 
6 


2 
10 


8 
3 


8 
4 


5 

7 


4 

,8 


7 
3 


8 
4 


7 
5 


65 


Defeats ... 


63 


Games played.... 


12 


11 


12 


12 


11 


12 


12 


12 


10 


12 


12 


128 


Drawn games.... 





1 





a 








1 














2 


Series won 














1 


1 








1 


1 


1 


5 


Series lost., 


1 








1 








1 


1 











4 


Series tied 








1 


























1 


Series unfinished. 





1 








1 











1 








3 


Chicago victories. 








2 























1 


3 


Chicago defeats . 




















1 


1 











3 


Won by one, run.. 


2 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


4 


1 


23 


Lost by one run . . 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 








3 





2 





11 


Single fig. vict's.. 


3 


4 


5 


2 


7 


6 


4 


3 


6 


7 


5 


51 


Single fig. def'ts.. 


6 


3 


4 


6 


2 


2 


3 


7 


2 


4 


1 


40 


Double fig. vict's . 


1 


2 


1 





1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


13 


Double fig. def'ts. 


2 


2 


2 


4 


1 


2 


4 


1 


1 





4 


23 


Home victories. . . 


1 


4 


5 


2 


5 


4 


4 


3 


4 


6 


5 


43 


Home defeats.... 


5 


2 


3 


4 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 





1 


26 


Victories abroad. 


3 


2 


1 





3 


4 


3 


1 


3 


2 


2 


22 


Defeats abroad. . . 


3 


3 


3 


6 


1 


2 


5 


5 


1 


4 


4 


37 


Extra inns, vict's. 


1 


1 














1 








1 





4 


Extra inns, det'ts. 














1 





1 








1 





3 


Highest sc're vic's 


11-4 


20-2 


11-10 


y-8 


14-10 


22 


14 


1-4 


1-1 


1-4 


1-8 


2-2 


Lowest sc'redef's 


1-4 


2-4 


2-6 


1-6 


2-15 


2-13 


0-6 


0-5 


2-11 


2-3 


3-6 


0-5 


Per cent of vict's 


.333 


.545 


.500 


.167 


.727 


.667 


.417 


.333 


.700 


.667 


.583 


.500 



•The Brooklyn club found the six western clubs easier to 
defeat than their five eastern rivals, the club winning 65 



28 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



games to 03 against the western clubs, but only 26 to 32 
against the fivs eastern teams. The club's record in fuW 
for 1893 appear s on page 27. 

THE BALTIMORE CLUB's RECORD. 

The Baltimore club began the season of 1893 on April 
27th, at Washington, with their special rivals of that city, 
and in their first two games there they had to succumb to 
the " Senators," and the good start for the latter put their 







d 


















1 




























Baltimore vs. 


d 




f 

5 





2 


a 


^ 

s 


i 


1 

a 


■A 


.2 
"5 

3 


1 


^ 




1 


s 
2 




s 

is 


1 


1 


> 



a 


_w 


9 







ca 


c 


?; 


n 


0^ 








6 


S 


E- 


Victories 


2 


5 


4 


10 


7 


1 


8 


4 


5 


9 


9 


60 


Defeats., 


10 


7 


8 


2 


5 


11 


4 


8 


7 


3 


5 


70 


Games played 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


10 


130 


Drawn gaiues.... 






































Series won .-. 











1 


1 





1 








1 


e 


4 


Series lost 


1 


1 


1 








1 





1 


1 








6 


Series tied 






































Series unfinished. 
































1 


• 1 


"Chicago " victs 














1 




















1 


"Chicago'' def'ts 

















1 








1 





1 


3 


Won by one run . 





1 


2 


2 


3 





2 





1 


3 





14 


Lost by one run . . 


1 





3 


2 








1 


5 


2 








14 


Single gg. vicfs . 


1 


4 


4 


6 


6 





6 


3 


2 


5 


5 


42 


Single lig. def is.. 


5 


4 


6 


2 


•? 


4 


1 


7 


5 


2 


3 


41 


Double lig. vicfs.. 


1 


1 





4 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 





18 


Double fig. def'ts.. 


5 


3 


2 





3 


7 


3 


] 


2 


1 


2 


29 


Home victories... 


2 


4 


3 


6 


4 


1 


3 


3 


2 


6 


3 


37 


IJome defeats.... 


4 


2 


3 





3 


3 


3 


3 


1 





3 


25 


Victories aliroad. 





1 


1 


4 


3 





5 


1 


3 


3 


2 


23 


Defeats .'Abroad... 


6 


6 


5 


2 


2 


8 


1 


5 


6 


3 


2 


45 


Extra iun's vict's. 





1 

















1 


1 








3 


Extra inn's def'ts 





1 





























1 


Highest sc're vic's 


16-12 


14-9 


8-7 


15-4 


11-5 


12-5 


15-5 


19-7 


13-2 


17-5 


9-1 


19-7 


Lowest sc'ra def's 


1-11 


2-10 


1-0 


3-4 


3-6 


0-2 


2-8 


2-3 


0-1 


1-8 


0-6 


0-2 


Per cent, of vic's. 


.167 


.417 


.333 


.833 


.583 


.083 


.667 


.333 


.417 


.750 


.500 


.462 



stock up in the local market. On the return game at Balti- 
more, however, the home team won ; but they had to close 
their brief April campaign as occupants of tenth place in 
the race, with percentage figures of .333 only, while Wash- 
ington was among the leaders with .667. The club did not 
pan out well in May, as the end of that month's campaign 
saw them still in tenth position, though with the better per- 
centage figures of .448. In June they got among the leaders 
for the first time, and by June 5th they had jumped up to 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 29 

fifth place with a percentage of . 531, the best they did during 
the season. But b"/ June 30th they were back in the second 
division again, with the figures at .471. They did not 
improve in July, as on the 31st of that month they stood in 
" ninth place with the figures of .430 only. They improved a 
little in August, as on the 31st of that month they were in 
eighth place with the percentage figures of .462. They did 
their best work in September, but could not get higher than 
eighth place, where they stood at the end of the season, with 
a percentage of .462. 

It may be said of the Baltimore club in 1S93 that it was 
forced to occupy an experimental position in the race, 
Manager Hanlon not having had time to get a team together 
in '92, and it took him half the season of 1893 to get his 
team in anything like working order. The fact that his 
team defeated Brooklyn by ten games to two, and the 
Clevelands by eight games to four, showed the inherent 
strength of the team he got together last year. In fact 
Hanlon had a hard row to hoe in '93, but the good effects 
of his work of last year will show itself this year unless all 
anticipations fail. The Baltimore club was certainly better 
managed and had a stronger team of players last year 
than ever before. The club's record in full for 1893 appears 
on page 28. 

THE CHICAGO CLUB's RECORD. 

The Chicago club, in 1893, was comparatively successful 
against their eastern club rivals ; but they lost ground by 
the number of defeats sustained in their home-and-home 
series. Against the six eastern teams they scored 35 vic- 
tories to 34 defeats; but in their games with their five west- 
ern rivals they were charged with no less than 37 defeats, 
which were offset by but 21 victories; and this difference in 
results made their campaign a disastrous one on the whole, 
the club standing lower in position at the end of the season 
of 1893 than in any previous year since they entered the 
League. They began the season with a defeat, and though 
they ended the short April campaign even in won games, 
with a percentage of victories of . 500, their May record 
ended with their occupancy of eleventh place in the race, 
with the low percentage figures of .385. They improved on 
this a little in June, but that month's campaign saw them 
'." eleventh place again on June 30th, with the somewhat 
better percentage of .400. In July they got up a peg higher, 
and ended that month's campaign in tenth place, with a 
percentage of .423. They did not advance in August, as at 



30 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



the end of that month they were still m tenth position, with 
the percentage figures of but .406. They got up to ninth 
position in September, and stood in that place on the last 
day of the campaign, with a percentage of 441 to their 
credit. Here is the club's record in full: 

















«■ 










1 






























it 


a 


"5 


2 


i 




P. 


ii 


a 










Chicago vs. 


5 
w 


1 


g 
1 


'5 


1 


i 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


C 
1 


X 




3 



4 



6 




6 


3 


a, 
6 


7 


3 


K 


9 


E- 


Victories 


7 


56 


Defeats 


9 


8 


7 


9 


4 


8 


6 


5 


7 


5 


3 


71 


Games plaved 


12 


12 


.12 


12 


10 


11 


12 


12 


10 


12 


12 


127 


Drawn games.... 

















1 

















1 


Series won 























1 





1 


1 


3 


Series lost 


1 


1 


1 


1 





1 








1 








6 


Series tied 




















1 














1 


Series uufinlsiied. 














1 


1 








1 








3 


" Ciiicago"vici's. 








1 


1 





1 











1 





4 


"Cllicago"deft.s 








1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 











7 


Won by oneruH.. 


1 








1 





2 


2 


2 





2 


1 


11 


Lost by one run . . 


4 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 





1 


2 


1 


3 


20 


Single fig. vict's.. 


2 


2 


3 


3 





4 


3 


5 


2 


£ 


4 


33 


Single fig def'ta . 


6 


6 


3 


7 


2 


5 


4 


2 


6 


2 


3 


46 


Double Mg. vict's. 


1 


2 


2 





G 





3 


2 


1 


2 


5 


24 


Double fig. def ts 


3 


2 


4 


2 


2 


3 


2 


3 


1 


3 





25 


Home victories... 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


1 


6 


7 


41 


Home defeats — 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


5 


2 


3 


3 


2 


34 


Victories abroad. 


5 


5 


4 


6 


1 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 


2 


32 


Defeats abroad... 


5 


5 


3 


6 


1 


5 


1 


3 


4 


2 


1 


36 


E.xtra inn"s vict's. 




















1 


2 











3 


E.xtra inn's def'ts 


1 








2 


1 














1 


1 


6 


Highest sc're vic's 


12.9 


17-6 


11-1 


9-4 


14-2 


8-6 


12-5 


10-4 


11-2 


15-10 


15-4 


17-6 


Lowest sc're def's 


1-2 
.250 


2-7 
.333 


0-5 
.417 


0-8 

.250 


0-11 
.600 


0-7 
.273 


0-4 
.500 


0-6 
.583 


1-3 
.300 


2-13 
.583 


2-3 0-11 


Percent, of vic'ts. 


.750 


.445 



THE ST. LOUIS CLUB S RECORD. 

The St. Louis club opened the championship campaign of 
1S93 very promisingly, with two victories out of their three 
games with the Louisvilles in April, they closing the 
month's record with a percentage of victories of .666. On 
May 4th they temporarily occupied first place in the race 
with .800 to their credit, and they kept well in the front up 
to the 22d of May, at which time the team took a tumble, 
and ended the May campaign in sixth place with a per- 
centage of .500. By the sixth of June they were in the, 
second division, and occupied ninth place with the lowered 
]iercentage of .433, and they ended the June campaign in 
tenth place. They rallied a little in July, and on the 14th 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



31 



of that month they headed the second division with a per- 
centage of .460, and they finished the July campaign in 
that position. They fell back in August, and on the 31st of 
that month were in ninth place with a percentage of .439. 
In September they allowed the Chicagoes to lead them, and 
the end of the season saw them in tenth place with a per- 
centage of .432. Taking the season altogether it was the 
best one they had had since Comiskey left them with a 
four-times-winner's record in the old association; Manager 
Watkins having done very well with the team under the usual 
St. Louis handicapping arrangement of official interference. 



St. Louis vs. 


"5) 
3 


'6 

1 


□ 


3 


0) 

.2 


1 


1 

s 


1 

5" 




1 
^ 


a 


a 

1 


1 




(^ 


G 


u 





J 


n 


0. 


s?; 


M 


3 


8 


H 


Victories 


3 


3 


5 


9 


8 


2 


8 


4 


4 


57 


Defeats 


9 


9 


7 


3 


4 


10 


4 


8 


8 


9 


4 


75 


Games played 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


132 


Drawn games 








1 











1 











1 


3 


Series won 











1 


1 





1 











1 


4 


Series lost 


1 


1 


1 








1 





1 


1 


1 







Series tied 














• 























Series unfinished. 






































" Chicago " vict's. 











1 




















2 


3 


" Chicago " derts. 


1 








1 











1 








1 


i 


Won by one run.. 


1 


2 


2 


3 








6 


2 


2 





1 


19 


Lost by one run . . 


3 


4 


2 


1 




2 


2 





4 


3 





22 


Single fig. vict's. . 


2 


3 


3 


7 







8 


3 


4 


2 


6 


44 


Single fig. defeats. 


6 


7 


6 


3 




6 


2 


6 


7 


5 


3 


54 


Double fig. vict's.. 


1 





2 


2 




2 





1 





1 


3 


13 


Double fig. def'ts 


3 


2 


1 







4 




2 


1 


4 


1 


21 


Home victories... 


2 


3 


3 


6 




2 


3 


3 


4 




6 


42 


Home defeats 


3 


5 


3 







4 


3 


3 


2 


3 


1 


30 


Victories abroad. 







2 


2 







5 


1 








2 


14 


Defeats a broad... 


6 


4 


4 


3 




6 


1 


5 


6 


5 


a 


45 


Extra Inn's vict's. 


1 





1 


2 








1 


1 


1 








7 


Extra inn's def'ts. 








2 





1 











1 





2 


6 


Highest sc're Vic's 


11-4 


8-7 


12-8 


lG-12 


11-1 


17-6 


9-8 


11-4 


8-3 


14-5 


13-6 


17-6 


Lowest sc're def's 


0-5 


2-3 


1-3 


0-4 


2-5 


1-5 


3-4 


0-4 


1-14 
.333 


1-5 

.250 


0-5 
.667 


0-5 


Per cent, of vict's 


.250 


.250 


.417 


.750 


.667 


.167 


.667 


.333 


.432 



It may be here remarked that the St. Louis club has for 
years been handicapped by official interference with its team 
manager. Mr. Von der Ahe ought, by this time, to have 
learned the costly nature of interfering with the team man- 
ager's control of his men. Of what use is it going to the 
expense of engaging a regular manager of a club team 
while jou practically nullify his work by allowing club offic- 
ials to interfere with his government of the team? Either 



32 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

let the manag^er have entire control of the team, or place the 
team in command of the captain and let the president or 
such other club official who thinks he knows how to run a 
team assume the responsibility of manager of the club. 
The players quickly find out whether the manager is boss, 
as Anson always has been, or the president of the club, as in 
the case of the well-known " boss manager" of St. Louis. 
The record of the St. Louis club in full appears on 
page 31. 

THE LOUISVILLE CLUB'S RECORD. 

The old League club of the seven ties had a rather unlucky 
experience in the opening months of their League champion- 
ship campaign of 1893, inasmuch as bad weather prevented 
them from playing many of their scheduled games during 
May; besides which the first part of the season was largely 
experimental with them, and it was not until midsummer 

















i 








u 






M 


•6 


ts 




i 






ii 


a 


Z 



to 




Louisville ts. 


3 
1 


1 

> 
<u 




a 


1 




1 


d 



1 


c 




1 

3 


1 


2 




s 





'6 





Ui 


C3 


Ch 


» 


M 




"^ 


E-' 


Victories 


4 


3 


6 


4 


4 


2 


4 


~T 


5 


5 


8 


50 


Defeats 


8 
12 


6 
9 


6 

12 


6 
10 


8 
12 


10 
12 


8 
12 


7 
12 


7 
12 


5 
10 


4 

12 


75 


Games played 


125 


Drawn games 























1 











1 


Series won 




1 
















1 




1 




1 




1 




1 






1 



1 


Series lost 


6 


Series tied 








1 


1 





1 
























1 






1 


Series unfinished. . . 


3 


"Chicago" victories 











1 





1 





1 





1 





4 


"Chicago" defeats. 


1 























1 





1 


3 


Won by one run. . . . 


1 





2 


2 


1 





1 














7 


Lost by one run 


1 














2 


2 


3 


1 





1 


10 


Single fig. victories 


1 


1 


4 


2 


3 


1 


4 


5 


1 


3 


7 


32 


Single fig. defeats.. 


4 


3 


2 





7 


3 


5 


4 


5 


5 


3 


41 


Double lig. victories 


3 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 








4 


2 


1 


18 


Double fig. defeats. 


4 


3 


4 


6 


1 


7 


8 


3 


2 





1 


34 


Home victories .... 





1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


4 


2 


4 


24 


Home defeats 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


4 


4 


2 


2 


2 


3 


29 


Victories abroad... 


4 


2 


3 


3 


3 





2 


1 


1 


3 


4 


26 


Defeats abroad 


4 


4 


4 


4 


6 


6 


4 


6 


5 


3 


1 


46 


Extra inns, vict'ries 











1 


1 




















2 


Extra inns, defeats. 


1 

















2 


2 











5 


Highest score vies.. 


14,3 


16-6 


12-3 


11-0 


15-0 


10-5 


9-5 


8-6 


19-8 


12-9 


14-3 


19-8 


Lowest score def'ts. 


O-U 


1-9 


3-5 


2-14 


1-6 


3-11 


2-6 


2-6 


0-5 


1-9 


0-3 
.667 


0-3 


Per cent, victories . 


.333 


.333 


.500 


.400 


.338 


~m 


.333 


.457 


.417 


.500 


.400 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 33 

that they got their team in good working order, and then 
they played good ball beyond question, as many of their 
July and August games fully proved. The club closed the 
April campaign ahead of Pittsburgh, and in May had Bos- 
ton and Chicago as close companions ; but the handicapping 
they were subjected to early in the season could not be over- 
come, and the campaign of June and July saw the club low 
down in the second division. In August they got out of 
the last ditch and pushed the unlucky Washington club into 
the tail end place, their percentage figures on August 30th 
reaching .400. The team's best work w^as done in Septem- 
ber, and they finished the campaign in eleventh place with 
a percentage of .400. Manager Barnie entered upon the 
campaign of 1893 with a difficult task- before him, in making 
up a team which would suit the rather exacting class of 
patrons of Louisville, With the able assistance of Captain 
Pfeffer, however, he managed to get together a strong team, 
and one which did some excellent work during the campaign. 
But it had its weak points, which will doubtless be strength- 
ened this year. The team quitted even with Cincinnati and 
Baltimore — the latter result pleasing Mr. Barnie — and had 
close fights with New York and Brooklyn, while they took 
the Washingtons into camp easily. 

The record of the club for 1^93 appears on page 32. 

THE WASHINGTON CLUB's RECORD. 

There is no city in the League circuit which affords better 
opportunities for the establishment of a first-class repre- 
sentative League club than does the city of Washington at 
this day. In fact, it is an exceptionally favored city for 
League club representation under first-class management 
and with grounds so fitted up as to court the high-class pat- 
ronage the city can give. But thus far in the club's brief 
League history it has been lacking in both these important 
essentials: the club grounds, for one thing, not being above 
the standard of that of a minor League organization ; and 
as regards the club government, the deficiency has been 
conspicuously apparent for the past two years. In fact, 
both Baltimore and Washington have been far behind the 
other eastern League clubs in respect to their lack of good 
ball grounds and the proper facilities for the encourage- 
ment of the best class of patronage which is at the com- 
mand of the clubs of both cities if properly catered for. 
No club can be financially successful to any special extent 
which neglects to furnish its patrons with the best diamond 



34 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



field and the best grand-stand appointments, such as are 
now possessed by the majority of the eastern League clubs, 
a point in club business management which the western 
clubs are beginning to see more plainly than hitherto. The 
exceptional position of the Washington club in their 
lack of these essential points in the running of a professional 
club, calls for their introduction to the Washington club's 
record for 1893, as its record in other respects can be briefly 
given. The club opened its 1 893 campaign very promisingly, 
they closing the April record a tie with St. Louis for second 



Washington vs. 


1 


03 

I 
1 


i4 



a 


a 


i 

3 


•6 

1 


a 
a 


c3 


1 


1 


(£ 






2 




2 


rt 


CO 


> 

Si 


1 




2 


^ 





53 






ca 


^ 


sz; 


ca 


n 


'5^ 











^ 


J 


r- 


Victories 


5 


4 


5 


3 


5 


2 


1 


4 


3 


4 


4 


40 


Defeats 


7 


8 


7 


s 




g 


11 


g 


9 


8 
12 


8 
12 


90 
120 


Games played 


12 


12 


12 


11 


12 


11 


12 


12 


12 


Drawn games . . . 





























1 





1 


Series won 






































Series lost 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


11 


Series tied 






































Series unlinished. 











1 





1 

















* 2 


" Chicago " vies. . 





























1 


1 


2 


" Chicago " def'ts. 














1 


1 


1 








2 





5 


Won by one run. . 


2 


1 





1 








1 


1 


3 





1 


10 


Lost by one run.. 


2 





2 


2 


3 


2 


1 


6 


1 


1 





19 


Single lig. vies... 


2 


1 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


3 


3 


3 


23 


Single fig. defeats 


5 


1 


4 


7 


6 


4 


6 


6 


4 


5 


7 


55 


Double lig. vies.. 


3 


3 


2 


1 


3 


1 





2 





1 


1 


17 


Double flg. def'ts. 


2 


7 


3 


1 


1 


5 


5 


1 


5 


3 


1 


34 


Home victories... 





2 


3 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


S 


1 


20 


Home defeats.... 


4 


1 


1 


3 


3 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


4 


26 


Victories abroad. 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3 








2 


2 


1 


3 


20 


Defeats abroad .. 


3 


7 


6 


5 


4 


8 


9 


4 


7 


6 


4 


63 


Kxtra inns. vies.. 





1 





1 














1 


2 





5 


Extra inns, def'ts 





1 














1 
















Highest sc're vies. 


17-15 


11-4 


16-8 


15-2 


14-7 


14-7 


4-3 


12-6 


7-6 


10-7 


14-3 


17-15 


Lowest sc'redTts 


2-5 


1-8 


1-2 


1-4 


0-5 


0-19 


0-7 


1-2 


1-2 


0-7 


1-3 


0-19 


Per cent, vict'ries 


.417 


.333 


.417 


^ 


.417 


.482 


.483 


.333 


.250 


.333 


.333 


.308 



position; and on May 5th the Washingtons temporarily 
held the lead in the race with a percentage of victories of 
.714. But the end of the May campaign saw the club in the 
second division, and thereafter they became fixtures there, 
and by the 12th of August they had been thrown into the 
last ditch, where they lay until the close of the season, 
their record on September 30th being last in the race with 
a percentage of .308, with a charge of 90 defeats out of 130 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 35 

games. The position the Washington club occupied in the 
campaign of 1893 can safely be said to be the result of the 
duo management which marked the government of the 
team. The veteran manager of the club ran the old League 
club of Buffalo for years with success, but in 1893, while in 
control — or part control, as alleged by the Washington 
scribes, of the Washington team he failed to meet the 
requirements of the local patrons. While good appoint- 
ments for a club are, to a certain extent, as essential to the 
business success of a team as good management and a strong 
team, there is also one other requirement, and that is, an 
almost unanimous support of the club by the local scribes, 
and the magnates of a club who fail to secure this, by the 
excellence of their club government, fail in one important 
point in the running of their club. The Washington club 
ot 1893 needed to learn this lesson, and the falling off of 
the patronage of the club in August and September made 
it impressive. 

THE BATTERY WORK OF 1893. 

THE PITCHING. 

The art of pitching in base ball never received more atten- 
tion from professional exemplars than was given it by the 
intelhgent minority of the League pitchers of 1893. In 
fact, for the first time in League club history was skillful 
strategy, in delivering the ball to the bat, brought more 
into play as a point of excellence in the art, than ever before 
smce professional base ball was inaugurated. The effective 
blow given to " cyclone" pitching^ by the new pitching rules 
which went into effect in 1893, while it did not materially 
affect the strategic class of pitchers — some of whom the new 
rules actually benefited — obliged the class of pitchers 
who depend solely upon their dangerous speed for success, 
to adopt strategic tactics to a more or less extent; and this 
is why a few of the old "cyclone" pitchers — as they are 
called — succeeded better than they had anticipated under 
che change made in the rules in 1893, which had placed them 
farther from the batsman than in 1892. Another thing in 
connection wnth the pitching of 1893, was that the more 
bramy class of men in the position began to pay more atten- 
tion to the advice of the theorists of the game than before ; 
and thereby they learned to rea ize the fact that strat^gz'c 
skill thorough cotitrol of temper and the avoidance of 
the senseless kicking habit in vogue, had more to do with 



^6 Spalding's official 

success in their position than they had previously been 
aware of. Those of the pitching fraternity who read up on 
the subject of skill in pitching, were told that the primary 
elements of strategic work in the box included: " First, to 
deceive the eye of the batsman in regard to the character 
ot the delivery of the ball, as to its being fast or slow. 
Second, to deceive his judgment in reference to the direction 
of the ball when pitched to him, as to its being high or low, 
or where he wants it. Third, to watch the batsman closely 
so as to know just when he is temporarily ' out of form' 
for making a good hit; and fourth, to tempt him with a 
ball which will be likely to go high from his bat to the out- 
field and be caught." 

Then again they were told that "another very effective 
point in strategic pitching is a thoroughly disguised change 
of pace in delivery. This is difficult of attainment, and as 
a general rule it can only be played with effect on the care- 
less class of batsmen. It is absolutely requisite that the 
disguise of the delivery should be complete, or otherwise 
the batsman will have time to prepare himself for the change 
of pace, The change from a very swiftly pitched ball to a 
medium pace or slow ball should largely depend upon the 
condition of preparation the batsman is in to meet the ball. 
If he is seen to be ready to make a quick wrist play stroke, 
then a swift ball over the plate would not be timely. Or if he 
is a ' slugger' and is ready to hit from the shoulder, a slow 
ball would be just what would suit him. It is extremely 
bothering to the general class of batsmen to have a swiftly 
pitched ball flash by them when they are looking for a com- 
paratively slow ball; and, 7'ice versa, a slow ball proves 
troublesome when the actions of the pitcher lead the bats- 
man to expect a fast bail. The rule of success in strategic 
pitching is never to send in a ball to suit the batsman 
unless you are obliged by the circumstances of the case to 
do so. The strategist I ear7is how to pretend to do this 
without actually doing it, and therein lies his art as a 
strategist." 

But there is one thing in which but little improvement 
was shown in the pitching department in 1893, and that was, 
in pitchers learning to control their quick tempers. They 
were advised by the theorists in this regard that "there 
are certain games in which thorough control of temper is 
as necessary to success as special skill in any department of 
the game, and this is an important essential in base ball. 
And in no position m the diamond field is it more requisite 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 37 

than in that of the occupant of the pitcher's 'box.' The 
pitcher who cannot contr®! his temper is as unfit for his 
position as is a quick-tempered biUiard player to excel as a 
winner in professional contests. Quick temper is the mortal 
foe of cool judgment, and it plays the mischief with that 
nervy condition so necessary in the development of skillful 
strategy. The pitcher must of necessity be subject to 
annoyances well calculated to try a man's temper; especially 
when his best efforts in pitching are rendered useless by the 
blunders of incompetent fielders, or he finds himself at the 
mercy of a prejudiced umpire. But under such trying cir- 
cumstances his triumph is all the greater if he can pluck 
victory out of the fire of such oppos"ition, by the thorough 
control of his teynper.'' This is something only a small 
minority of League pitchers did in 1893. 

In recording the pitchers' statistics of 1893, we are again 
obliged to use the figures of the percentage of victories 
pitched in as a criterion of the pitching excellence of the 
season. The League code of playing rules still continues 
to be lamentably deficient in the method adopted in record- 
ing earned runs. We introduced the record of runs earned 
twenty odd years ago, simply as a test of pitching skill ; and 
it was intended to apply only to runs solely earned by base 
hits, and not by skillful base running and the fielding errors 
such running involves. But the League code still retains 
the blundering rule in this respect, which credits a run as 
earned off the pitching if only a single base hit be made, 
such hit being followed by two or more stolen bases. Con- 
sequently the official record of earned runs, which decides a 
pitcher's relative position in the averages by the percentage 
of runs earned off his pitching hy a co7nbination of base 
hits and stolen bases, still remains utterly useless as a 
criterion of excellence in box work, though it may indicate 
the fact that the combination has led to runs being actually 
earned, but not solely off the pitching. 

THE CATCHING. 

The increased distance between the catcher and the 
pitcher, . required under the new rules of 1893, materially 
helped the catcher by lessening the speed of the delivery 
and consequently the arduous duties of the catcher's posi- 
tion to that extent ; and the result was fewer passed balls and 
more effective work behind the bat than in previous seasons. 
There was, however, too many changes made in the catch- 



38 Spalding's official 

ing department to lead to the thorough work in the position 
which regular team playing brings about; and by "team 
playing" is meant that united effort of the two players of 
the battery team of the nme which leads to their working 
together as a team, and not as two distinct players, such as 
would characterize the battery of a so-called picked nine. 
The books of instruction on this subject state that " pitchers 
should bear in mind the important fact that, no matter how 
skillful they may be in the delivery of the ball to the bat, 
they must be largely dependent for success upon the char- 
acter of the assistance rendered them by their catcher. 
It is especially a matter of the first importance to a strate- 
gic pitcher that he should have a first-rate man behind the 
bat to second him in all his little points of play. For this 
reason is it that pitchers and catchers should always work 
together in pairs. They should be familiar with each other's 
peculiar methods of playing their respective positions. A 
first-rate catcher for one pitcher might be almost useless 
for another, as far as helping the pitcher in strategic play 
is concerned. Each should fully understand the other's 
signals in a match — the catcher those of the pitcher, so as 
to be able to be prepared for a sudden change of pace ; and 
the pitcher those of the catcher, so as to know when the 
latcer wants his partner to pitch for throwing to bases; for 
it is almost impossible for a catcher to do his best in throw- 
ing to bases unless the pitcher sends him in balls especially 
for that purpose. A pitcher must largely depend upon his 
catcher in playing the point of catching a batsman ' out of 
form,' for unless the catcher is quick in returning the ball to 
the pitcher the chance to play the point is lost." 

ADVICE TO KICKING PITCHERS. 

The utter folly of a pitcher's kickinp; against decisions on 
called balls and strikes, was plainly shown, time and again, 
in the League pitching of 1S93. In fact, there were not a 
half-dfi^zen pitchers in the professional frateriiity in 1893 
who knew even " a little bit" about the art of '' pitching for 
the umpire." In a chapter on this topic in Spalding's " How 
to Play Base Ball," the editor says: 

"The experience of pitchers has taught them that, as a 
general rule, umpires are but fallible beings, and that their 
errors of judgment frequently militate greatly against the 
success of a pitcher who avails himself of his skill as a 
strategist in the position. It, therefore, becomes a point to 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 39 

play, to 'pitch for the umpire' in a match, as weflas against 
the batsman ; and by this nothing is meant in the way of 
making that important official the pitcher's adversary ; but, 
on the contrary, to work on him in such a manner as to gain 
his good will to the extent of inducing him to decide in 
favor of the pitcher rather than the batsman when there is 
a doubt in the matter of rendering a decision on called balls 
and on strikes. 

' ' For instance, when the pitcher sees that the umpire is more 
concerned about avoiding being hit by the ball, than 
about the accuracy of his rulings in calling ' balls' and 
' strikes,' he should avoid, as much as possible, sending in 
balls which are neither directly orer the base nor yet so 
clearly not over as to leare a doubt as to the line of their 
delivery ; because under such circumstances all such doubtful 
balls are apt to be more frequently called against the pitcher 
than in his favor. Nervy and plucky umpires, who can 
cooly use their keenest judgment when facing the hot fire 
of a swift delivery, are sadly in the minority ; and when a 
pitcher finds himself in the hands of an official who is apt 
to be disconcerted at times, he must suit his pitching to the 
exigencies of the case, and, to a certain extent, pitch for 
the umpire, and not so as to annoy or intimidate him. 
Moreover, it is the height of folly on the part of a pitcher 
to work against the umpire by repeated appeals for judg- 
ment on strikes, as it is simply a tacit questioning either of 
his jndgvie7it or his impartiality. The pitcher should, by 
word as well as action, give the umpire to understand that, 
he has implicit faith in his impartiality, and relies fuUjr on 
the soundness of his judgment; and if he can make just 
such a favorable impression on the umpire as this apparent 
faith in his ability leads to, the calling of balls will not be 
as frequent as called strikes. A pitcher who, by word or 
action, incurs the prejitdice of an umpire in a Diatch, is 
simply working agaiiist his own ijiterests. To play 
points against the umpire is simply to outwit his judgment, 
and to avoid giving him any cause for irritation or ill will." 
This point of play in pitching is worthy the earnest atten- 
'tion of every pitcher who desires to excel in 1894. 

THE PITCHING RECORDS. 

The record showing the leading quartette of pitchers of 
each of the twelve League clubs, who pitched in not less 
'than ten games during the championship season of 1893, 
together with the aggregate of percentage of victories of 
each quartette, is as follows: 



40 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 

Aggregate 
(;iub. Pitchers' Names ia Percentage Order. Percentage. 

1. Boston Gastrlght Nichols, Staley and Stivetts 677 

•J. Pittsburgh Killen, Gumbert, Terry and Ehret 6S0 

3. Cleveland Young, Cuppj, (Jlarksonand Hastings 603 

4. Pliiladelpliia Weyhin^, Caisey, Keefe and Taylor 621 

5. Cincinnati Chamberlain, Parrott, Dwyerand King 570 

6. Brooklyn Kennedy, Stein, Daub and Haddock 547 

7. New York Petty, Kusie, German, Baldwin ^i>'2 

8. Baltimore McMahon, McNabb, Mullane and Hawke 519 

9. Chicago McGill, Mauck, Hutchison and Abl)ey 465 

10. St. Louis Clarkson, Brietenstein, Gleason and Hawley. . .445 

11. Louisville Hemming, M'^uefee, Stratton and Rhodes..'. . . .410 

VI. Washington Duryea, Meckin, Esper and Maul 333 

It is a noteworthy fact that the aggregate percentage of 
figurss of the quartette of pitchers accords — with one ex- 
ception — with the relative position of each club in the pen- 
nant race. 

THE BOSTON CLUli's PITCHING RECORD FOR 1 893. 

The Boston club of 1S93 really won the championship of 
the season with a quartette of pitchers only, and through- 
out the year they only tried but six in all, and two of these 
in but three games, Quarles winning two and losing two, 
while Coyle was only tried in a single game, and that resulted 
in his defeat. The brunt of the work was done by Nichols, 
who pitched in 46 games; Stivetts pitching in 33, Staley in 
21 and Gastright in 17. Nichols was the most successful 
pitcher of the quartette against the six western teams 
opposed to him; while Gastright did the best against the 
eastern teams, the latter not losing a game against the east- 
ern teams, while Nichols lost 7 out of 24 in the east, Stivett 
losing 7 out of 18 there and Staley 5 out of 13. Nichols 
troubled New York and Philadelphia badly and he shut out 
the St. Louis team without a game to their credit out of 
four games played. Stivett was most successful against 
Brooklyn and Staley against Baltimore. Gastright did 
not let his old club, the Pittsburghs, get a single game 
from him. In percentage of victories against the eleven 
clubs Gastright bore off the palm with. 7 50 to Nichols' .696, 
Staley's .665 and Stivetts' .636. The club's pitching 
record in full for 1893, showing the victories and defeats 
each of the six pitchers of the club pitched in, and their 
victories and defeats against each separate club, to which 
is added a summary showing the percentages against the 
east and west, as also of the whole, appears on page 41. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



41 



Boston vs. 



o<^Mgbt {^;,x 

f'-ooi, i^^;:'^?; 

s^'ey-- IS 

s"ve..s i';;-^: 

«-"os ja 



Eastern Clubs. 1 


Western Clubs. 


1 


.2 








a 


















1 
3 


i4 




d 
^ 

;a4 


j 

■3 


6 

a 
'B 

> 





3 
2 


1 





is 


1 

■a 


1 

3 




3 




Ph 


'A 


oi 


» 


H 


Oh 





:-) 


:-) 


c/. 


-) 


H 





"0 


1 


1 


2 


1 


5 


1 


1 


2 


1 





2 


7 


12 


























2 


1 


1 





4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


1 


4 


17 


2 


2 


1 


3 


4 


3 


15 


32 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 


7 


3 


1 


2 


1 








7 


14 


2 


1 





5 





8 


G 


3 


1 


1 


4 


2 


11 


19 


2 


1 


1 





1 


5 


1 


2 


1 








1 


5 


10 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2. 


11 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


10 


21 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


7 


1 


1 


1 


1 





1 


5 


12 
































1 


1 


2 


2 





























] 


1 





2 


2I 









































0' 




















1 

















1 


ll 



.750 



.655 
.636 



.500 
.000 



Against the East. 



PITCHERS. 



Gastri3:ht. 
Nichors , . 
Staley . . , . 
Stive tts . . 
Quarles . . 
Coyle 



Per 
ct. 



1.000 
.708 
.615 
.611 
.000 
.000 



Against the West. 



PITCHERS. 



Nicbols .. 
SUvetts.. . 

Staley 

Gastfight. 
Quarles . . 
Coyle 



w 


L 


P 


Vo 


7 


22 


10 


6 


15 


11 


5 


16 


7 


4 


11 


2 


2 


4 





1 


1 



Per 
ct. 



.636 
.500 
.000 









3RAND 


TOTAL. 








PITCHERS. 


w 


- 

4 
14 
10 


P 

16 

46 

or) 


Per 
ct. 

.750 
.696 
655 


PITCHERS. 


2112 
2 2 
1 


P 

33 
4 
1 


Per 

ct. 


Gastright 

Nichols 

Staley 


'■••jjq 


Stivetts 


636 


Quarles 

Cov'e 


.500 
000 





















In placing the names of the pitchers in therecord the lead 
is given in the order of percentage of victories, and in this 
way a pitcher who pitched in but one game, and that one a 
victory, necessarily takes the lead over one who lost a game. 
For instance, in the record of the Pittsburgh club's fielding, 
which follows. Maul has a percentage of .1000, the result 
of a single victory and no defeat; but Killen's percentage 
of .702 in 27 games pla3^ed, is really the successful pitching 
record of the club. He was more effective against the 
eastern teams than against those of the west, by a per- 
centage of .720 to .682, as wasGumbert; while Terry had 
a percentage of 857 against the western teams and but .632 
against the eastern. Gastright, while with the Pittsburghs, 



42 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



did not pitch in a game against the eastern teams, but he 
reached a percentage of .600 against the western teams. 
Ehret did the bestagainst the western teams by. 529 to. 471. 
Baldwin did not win a game for Pittsburgh, while Colco- 
lough won two out of the three he pitched in. 
Here is the record in full for 1893: 

riTTSBURGH CLUB's PITCHING RECORD. 



PrrrsBURGU rs. 



"West'k Clttbs, 



,y 



Eas 


TE 


RN 


CLuns. 


eS 








d 




.C 


^ 


. 


.; 







~ 


— 


— 


— 


ti) 
















— 


-^ 




- 


■~ 


3! 



-11 



=1 



^»"' IS; 

™- {K: 

=">»'«'•' &: 

'■»"=o'»>'8i. {;^»?; 

^-•> IS- 

'■''^■■'s'" & 

K"™' IK: 

Baldwin J^'o^?- 



> 


:j 


f 


00 


i 


1 


^ 


T^ 


'-J 


£ 


^ 




































































3 


.3 


2 


3 


4 


15 


2 


2 


4 


1 


6 


2 








1 


4! 


7 


1 


3 


2 


1 








2 


1 


1 


11 


5 


2 





2 





3 


1 








1 





2 





1 


1 


2 





























1 














1 








1 




















2 


2 


1 


1 


6 





2 





1 


2 





1 











1' 


2 


1 


1 


1 








1 


1 


1 





•"^1 

















1 








1 





2 




















1 


3 


3 


2 


9 


2 


1 


1 


2 





4 


2 


2 








8' 


1 


2 





4 


1 



































1 














1 


1 











0' 



1 1: 


18 33 
7114' 
13 
4 
2 

612 
6, 7 
3 
0! 2 

8 17. 

9 17 

0! 

1 



l.OOQ 
.702 
.684 



.632 



.500 
.000 



SUMMARY. 



Agaikst tub East. 


1 Against the West. 


riTCHERS. 


w 

6 
6 
15 
3 
9 





L 

1 
2 
7 
2 
8 

1 
1 


P 

7 
7 

22 
5 

17 

1 
1 


Per 
ct. 

.857 
.714 
.682 
.600 
.529 
.000 
.000 
.*00 


riTCHERS. 


2 
1 

IS 

8 
6 
8 




11 

2 
1 
7 25 
4 12 
6 12 
9,17 

0! 


Per 
Ct, 


Terry 

fiumbert 


Colcolougli 

Maul 

Killen 


l.OCO 

1.000 

720 


Killen 


GastrigUt, 


Gumbert 


667 


Ehret 

Maal 


Terry 

Khri't 


.50(» 
471 


Oolcfolougti 

naldwin 


Baldwin 

G:istrlglit 


.000 
.000 









3RAND 


TOTAL. 










PITCHERS. 


w 

1 
33 
13 

2 


L 

"o 

14 
6 

1 


p 

1 

47 
19 
3 


Per 
ct. 


riTcnEKS. 


w 

12 
3 

17 



L 

7 
2 
17 

1 


P 

19 
5 

34 
1 


Per 
ct. 


Maul 


1.000 
.702 
.684| 
.667' 


Terrv 

v.astiright 

Ehret 

Baldwin 


6?- 


KilleQ 


.600 
.500 
.000 


Gumbert 


Colcolough 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



43 



THE CLEVELAND CLUB's PITCHING RECORD. 

The Cleveland club in 1893 virtually relied on the service 
of but three pitchers, viz., Young, Cuppy and Uarkson 
these three pitching in iii games out of the 128 won and 
lost Hastings pitched in ten games, Williams Schauble 
and Fisher in two each, and Daviesin but one. Young was 
the most successful against the Brooklyns m the east and 
aeainst the Louisvilles in the west ; Cuppy succeeding the best 
against the Pittsburgh, Washington and St. Louis teams; 
while Clarkson did the best against the Washingtons and Chi- 
caeos Young found the Phillies the most difficult team to win 
from ' while Cuppy didn't win a game from Baltimore nor 
cTa?kson from New York or Louisville. The latter pitcher 
weakened his work in the box by his silly kicking agamst 
declsfons on called balls and strikes, Young's good humor 
being in striking and favorable contrast to Clarkson s iru- 
tablltemper. Cuppy did effective work against the Pi tts- 
burghs.the latter fkiling to win one of the four games m 
whi?h Cuppy pitched against them, but Boston andBaltimore 
won easily against him. He led Young in percentage fig- 
ures agai^nst the western teams by .706 to .700; butYoung 
ledhin. by .645 to .455 against thg eastern teams Cl^^kson 
did better against the west than the east by .61 5. to . 500. i he 
pitching failuresof the team were Davies and Fisher, neither 
of whom pitched in a victory. Here is the recordin full: 



Cl-EVELAND VS. 



( Wen. 
Young \ Lost. 

I Wen. 
Cuppy I Lost. 

( Won. 
Clarkson |Lost. 

I Won. 
Williams [Lost. 

Schauble {lo^s?.' 

(Won. 

Hastings | i^ost. 

(Won. 

Davies (Lost. 

Fisher JLost. 



West'n Clubs. | 


Eastern Clubs. 




K 


a 
be 

13 


1 

5 

5 


0" 


i 


> 


rr 


a 


2 

S 

a; 





d 


i 




bi) 
a 


r/3 


2> 


1 









1 





B 


a) 



g 

aa 


;3 


i 







s 


s 


^ 


?, 


?, 


3 


14 


3 




4 




3 


4 


20 


34 


.667 


?, 


9, 


1 


1 





6 


3 




1 




2 





11 


17 




4 


1 


1 


?, 


.S 


12 







1 







2 


5 


17 


.607 








9 





1 


^ 


1 




1 




1 


1 


<3 


11 







1 


8 


9. 





8 


2 









1 


3 


8 


16 


.50U 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


fi 


2 




3 




1 





11 


it) 





































1 


1 


1 


.500 





























u 


1 





1 


i 













n 























1 


1 


i 


.500 





n 








n 

















1 





1 


1 







1 


1 


1 





^ 








1 











1 


4 


.4UU 





1 





1 


1 


a 





c 


1 


t 


2 





3 


6 













n 
































.000 


f) 








(1 








n 


1 


c 











1 


1 







n 


f 


f 


























(J 





.000 


ol 


c 


c 








1 





u 


J 


u 


u 


21 2 





44 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



AGAINST THE EASI 








Against tue V<est. 




PITCHEKS. 


TV 

12 
14 
8 
3 





L 

5 
6 
5 
3 






p 

17 
•20 
13 
6 






Per 

ct. 

.706 
.700 
.615' 
.500 
.000 
.000 
.000 
.000 


PITCHERS. 


20 
1 
1 
5 

I 





1131 
1 2 
1 2 
6 11 

1119 

21 2 


Per 
ct. 


Cuppy 


Young 

Williams 


.645 
ftOO 


Clarkson 


Schauble 

Cuppv 


500 


IlastiKgs 


455 


Wiilianis 


;Clark.son 

; Hastings 

1 Davies 

1 Fisher 


4"?! 


SchaubU" 


950 


Davies 

Fisher 


.000 
.000 



GRAND TOTAL. 



PITCHEKS. 


w 


L 


P 


Per 

ct. 


PITCHERS. 


w 


L 


P 


Per 
ct. 


Young 

<'"ppy 

(Jlarkson 

Williams 


34 
17 
16 

1 


17 
11 
16 

1 


51 

28 

32 

2 


.667 
.607 
.500 
.500 


Schauble 

Hastings 

Davies 

Fisher 


1 
4 




1 
6 
1 
2 


2 
10 

I 


.500 
.400 
.000 
.000 



THE riilLADELPHIA CLUB S riTCHING RECORD. 

Weyhing bore off the p^lm in pitching for the PhiUieft 
in i8g3, Carsey being second and Keefe third in percentage 
of victories pitched in, though Keefe led in percentage 
of runs earned oif his pitching, Weyhing being second in 
this latter respect and Carsey third. But this earned run 
record is rendered useless as an estimate of pitching skill, 
from the fact that under the existing scoring rules the base 
running is combined with base hitting in the record of runs 
earned off the pitching. Both Weyhing and Keefe led 
Carsey against eastern teams, but Carsey led Keefe and Wey- 
hing against the western. Weyhing was most successful 
against the Cleveland batsmen in the west and against the 
New Yorkers in the east; Keefe doing his best against 
Washington in the east and Chicago in the west. Carsey 
troubled the Brooklyns most in the east and the Cincinnatis 
in the west. Taylor was very effective against the Wash- 
ingtons and Clevelands. Vickery did not win but a single 
victory against any one club. He was swift in delivery, but 
lacked in " headwork" and in control of temper, both impor- 
tant essentials for successful pitching nowadays. The 
club's leading quartette pitched in 103 games, and the other 
three only in 19 games, exclusive of drawn games, which 
are not included in the pitching records. The pitching 
record of the Phillies in full for 1^93 appears on page 45. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



45 



Philadelphia vs. 



wejnlng ]S 

Carsey { Jf-- 

Keete ] S' 

Taylor ]K- 

Vlctery ] £■ 

S-a.™..... {K- 

McGlnnls. \'^%l 



Eastern Clurs-I 


Western Clubs. 


a 
o 

24 
9 

22! 
12 
10 

^8 

^i 


2 
2 
2 
3 


^ 

1 








'^ 

1 
3 

1 

I 

1 

1 




a 

>^ 

3 
1 
2 
1 


1 

2 

1 






2 

o 

1 
? 

2 

2 

? 

1 




1 





§■ 

a 
1 

3| 
1 
11 

^1 

2' 

o' 



«' 





1 
I 

11 

8 

6 
6 
8 
3 
4 
1 
2 
1 
2 




it 

2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 



1 

1 1 


'6 
1 
> 

4 
1 
2 
2 


2 

1 







a 
a 

o 

a 
3 

2 

3 


1 

1 
1 
1 


1 






1 

5 
1 

3 

1 
2 


1 
G 


1 
1 



■j: 

3 
3_ 
CO 

1 
1 
2 
2 

1 

1 

2 



1 


i 

'3 

3 

2 
1 
4 




1 

1 
1 
1 





1 


13 
8 

15 
6 
4 
2 
5 
4 
4 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 



Oh 

.727 
.647 
.500 
.500 
.COO 
.400 
.250 



SUMMARY. 



Against the East. 



PITCHERS. 



Taylor,... 
Weyhing. 

Keefe 

Carsey . . . 
Sliarrott. , 
Vickery. . . 
McGinriis. 



]AS 


T. 






W 


l 


P 


Per 

ct. 


2 





•7 


1.000 


11 


8 


19 


.579 


8 


6 


14 


.571 


7 


6 


13 


.538 


1 


2 


3 


.333 


1 


2 


3 


.333 











.000 



Against the West. 



PITCHERS. 



Carsey . . 

Keefe 

Weyhing. 
Vickery . 

Taylor 

Sliarrott. 
McGinnis 



w 


^ 


P 


15 


~6 


21 


4 


2 


6 


13 


8 


21 


4 


3 


7 


5 


4 


9 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 



Per 

ct. 

,714 

,667 
.619 
.571 
,55& 
.500 
.200 







GRAND 


TOTAL. 










PITCHERS. 


w 

24 

22 
10 
8 


L P 

9 33 


Per 

ct. 

.727 
.647 
.500 
.500 


PITCHERS. 


w 

5 
2 

1 


L 

5 
3 
3 


P 

10 
5 
4 


Per 

ct. 


Weyhing 


Vickery 

Sharrott 


50O 




12 

'I 


34 
20 
16 


400 


Keefe 


McGinni.s 


^fiO 


Taylor 







THE NEW YORK CLUB S PITCHING RECORD. 

The battery work of the New York pitchers was of a very 
uncertain quality in 1893, they having had the most bat- 
tery errors charged to them of any club in the arena in 1893. 
Petty led the pitchers in percentage of victories pitched in ; 
*but he pitched in less than ten games, as did King, the sec- 
ond best in percentage figures, these two pitching in but 



46 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



15 games, outside of drawn games; while Rasie, German 
and Baldwin aggregated a total of 103 games, the remain- 
ing six pitchers only pitching in 14 games. German led all 
the others in effectiveness against the- eastern teams, Rusie 
being second and Baldwin third in this respect. But against 
the west King, Petty and Crane were the first three. The 
latter, however, was a bad failure against the eastern teams. 



^Ew York vs. 



■-^■"T {LT 

Ki^ \l^: 

Ku^ie IS; 

«—. \ZS: 

Baldwin -j Lost. 

I Won. 
^-rane -|Lost. 

^ . ( Won. 

navies -JLost. 

,, , I Won. 

I^ouaJi"'- -JLost. 

I'orenian \'^^^; 

\ Won. 
JO'^^-'^ iLost. 

Schmidt \]]^i' 



Eastern Clubs 



Western Clubs. 



oS 



- ■^ 'r 

'^ -3 ^ 









n 


(1 


(1 





'2 


1 





1 


1 


5 


si 





(1 


n 


II 


II 





1 





1 








2 


2 


1 


(i 


1 


1 




2 

















2 


^\ 











1 


























3! 


3 


4 


4 


.3 


16 


2 


4 


2 


3 


2 


4 


17 


33; 


1 


2 


2 


It 


9 


4 





2 


2 


1 


3 


12 


21 


1 


2 




1 


6 











1 


2 


1 


4 


10 





1 





Oi 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 








6 


8 


2 





1 


2 


7 








2 





2 


1 


5 


12 


1 


2 


2 


2 


7 


2 


2 


1 


2 


3 


2 


12 


19 























1 


1 


1) 





2 


2 





1 





1 


3 





1 














1 


* 





























1 





1 


1 

















1 








1 








2 


2 









































1 











1 























1 











0' 





























1 











1 























1 











0| 


























oi 




















1 














1 


1; 






































ol 


1 








0! 


1 








1 











1 


2!| 



.714 
.625 



.611 
.556 



.387 
.333 



.333 
.000 



.000 
.000 



.000 



SUMMARY. 



Against THE East. 


Against the West. 


I'lTCHEKS. 


6 
16 
7 
3 









3 
9 

3 
1 
1 
1 
3 





r 

9 
25 
14 
6 
1 
1 
1 
3 

I 




Per' 
ct. 

.6671 
.640 
.5U0 
.500 
.000 
.000, 
.000 
.000 
.000, 
.000 

.oool 


riTCHEBS. 


w 

2 
6 
2 

17 
4 
1 
5 






L 


2 

1 

12 
5 

12 





P 

7 
3 

29 
9 
3 

17 
1 
1 




Per 

ct. 


CiGrnicin 


King 


1.000 




Petty 


714 






667 


Kin"^ 


Kusie 


.586 


Donahue 


(Jerman 

Davics 

Baldwin 


.444 


Foreman 


.333 


Schmidt 


.294 


Crane 


Jones 


,000 


Davie.s 

Jones 


Schmidt 

Donahue 


.000 
,000 


Petty 


Foreman 


.000 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 
GRAND TOTAL. 



47 



PITCHERS. 


5 
5 
33 
10 
12 
2 


2 

3 
21 

8 
19 

4 


r 

7 
8 

54 

IS 

31 

6 


Per 
ct. 

.714 

.625 
.611 
.556 
.387 
.333 


PITCHERS. 


1 






L 

2 

1 
1 
1 
2 


P 

3 
1 
1 

1 
2 


Per 
ct. 


Petty 


Da vies 


33? 


King 


Donahue 


000 


Rusie 


Foreman 


000 


German 


Jones 


000 


Baldwin 


Scliuiidt ... 


000 


Crane 







Rusie troubled the Clevelands the most, as he did in 1892, 
while in the east he was most successful against the Brook- 
lyns, Pittsburgh hit him hard, however. German was the 
most successful against his old club; the Baltimores, in the 
east, and against the St. Louis Browns in the west. Three 
of the eastern teams and two of the western did not win a 
game against him. In fact, German and Wilson were the 
best working team of the New York batteries in 1S93. The 
trouble with Rusie was his not having a catcher to suit him 
half the timiC. He did his most effective pitching with 
Milligan behind the bat. Baldwin troubled the Bostons 
most in the east and the Cincinnatis in the west. 
Unluckily, this fine pitcher's uncontrolled temper is dead 
against him in his box w^ork; in all other respects his pitch- 
ing is up to a high mark. Donahue, Foreman, Jones- 
and Schmidt did not add a single victory to the club record 
against the six western teams, and Davies but one. and not 
one of them pitched in a victory against the five eastern 
teams, while they aggregated ten defeats out of eleven 
games pitched in. In fact, the pitching experiments of the 
New York club in 1893, with one exception, were dead fail- 
ures. The record in full appears on page 46. 

THE CINCINNATI CLUB's PITCHING RECORD. 

The Cincinnati club experimented with nine pitchers in 
1893 and at considerable cost in loss of games^ there being 
but four of the nine who did not pitch in more defeats than 
victories. Darby — who did not pitch against an eastern 
team — led in percentage of victories, but in the aggregate 
Chamberlain was the most successful pitcher, Dwyer being 
second and Parrott third. Mullane did well against the 
western teams, but he was useless against the eastern 
batsmen, as four defeats out of five games show. King did well 
in the Cincinnati team, he doing his best against the east- 
ern teams. Sullivan only pitched in one victory out of 
seven games against the western teams, but did better 



4S SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

against the eastern. Dwyer did some verj'' effective pitch- 
ing against the leaders, especially with the Bostons, who 
could not bat out a victory against him. Parrott did the best 
against the Pittsburghs, and Chamberlain against New 
York, while Mullane troubled Anson's colts the most. Jones 
was next to useless, he pitching in but a single victory out 
of four games, though great things were expected of him. 
Cross, too, was useless. Here is the record of the pitching 
experiments of theCincinnatis in 1S93: 



Cincinnati v: 



I>irhv ' ^^'®°- 

^*^"y (Lost. 

Chamberlain \l'^^^; 

^'--^t IS; 

^^*"s IS; 

Mullaue ] ;]^*^;;- 

Sullivan IS; 

J-- IS; 

^-- IS: 



West'n Clubs. | 


Eastern 


Club 


^. 


J 

1 
g 


1 


1 


i 


03 

1 


1 

c 


. 




1 

a; 
1 


1 


p 


i 

S 
"3 


. 1 
s 1 


a 


s 

,0 


Clh 


^ 


y 


CO 


-J 


E-i 


a; 


a. 


^ 


Si 


aq 


H 


-^1 











2 


0' 


si 

















0, 





2' 





1 











11 























ll 





1 


2 


2 


^\ 


5 


2 





3 


2 


1 


1 


1 9 14 


1 





2 





1 


4 


1 


1 


2 








1 


, 5[ 9] 





2 


2 





3 


7 


3 





1 


3 


3 


1 


1118 


3 


1 


1 


1 





6 


1 


2 


2 





2 


1 


1 8 14!l 


2 








1 


1 


4! 


1 


1 





1 


1 


2 


, 6 10! 





1 





1 


1 


3; 


1 


2 


1 





1 





5 


81 





1 


1 


1 





3' 








1 


1 


1 


1! 


4 


7i' 


1 





1 


d 


2 


4 





1 











ll 




6: 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


6 

















1 


1 1 


7 


1 


2 











3 


1 


1 





1 


1 







7 





1 











1 








1 


2 


2 


1 


1 6 


7 1 


2 








2 


2 


6 


2 


2 





2 





1 


1 '^ 


13; 














1 


1 


i 




















1 


1 





1 


1 





3 























3 



















1 


1 




















Oil 

















1 





1 


1 








2 


2' 



,609 
,563 



.556 



.600 



.250 



SUMMARY 



Against the East. | 


ACAINST THE WEST. 


prrcHERS. 


w 

6 
2 
4 
5 

7 
3 
1 
1 



L 
3 

I 

4 
6 
4 
3 
6 



r 

9 
3 
7 
9 
13 
7 
4 
7 



Per 

ct. 

.667 
.667 
.571 
.556 
.538 
.429 
.250 
.143 
.000 


PITCHERS. 


w 

4 
9 

10 
6 
6 
1 

J 




± 

2 6 
5 14 
8 18 
511 
7 13 


Per 
ct. 


Mullane 


King 


667 


Darbv 


Chamberlain 


643 


Parrott 

€hami)erlain 


Dwver 

Parrott 


.556 
545 


Dwver 


Sullivan 


46? 


Kiug 

Jones 




3 
4 

2 


4 
5 

2 


250 


Mullane 


?00 


Sullivan 


Darby 

Cross 


000 


Cross 


.000 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 
GRAND TOTAL. 



49 



PITCHERS. 


\x 

~^ 
U 

18 
10 

7 


L 

1 
9 
14 

8 
6 


P 

3 
23 
32 

18 
13 


Per 
ct. 

.607 
.609 
.563 
.556 

.538 


PITCHEKS. 


\v 

7 
7 
1 



L 

7 
13 
3 
2 


P 

14 

20 
4 
2 


Per 

ct. 


Darby '. . , . 


Mullaue 


500 


Ohamberliiiu 


Sullivau ' ' 


350 


Dwyer 


Jones 


350 


Parrott 

King 


I Cross 


.000 



THE BROOKLYN CLUB S PITCHING RECORD. 

The two most successful pitchers of the Brooklyn club in 
1893 were Kennedy and Stein, these two pitching in 24 vic- 
tories and 21 defeats against the six leading teams which 
ended the season in the first division, a record to be proud 
of, Haddock being third in this respect. Stein led against 
the- five eastern teams with a percentage of victories of 
.550 to Kennedy's .438. But Kennedy led against the six 
western teams with a percentage of .667 to Stein's .615, 
Haddock leading Kennedy against the east, while Daub 
was third against the west. Sharrott only did fairly well 
against the eastern teams and he pitched in but 3 victories 
out of 9 games against the western teams. Lovett could 
only even up against the west, while the eastern teams pun- 
ished him badly. Crane was useless, as he did not pitch in 
a single victory. Haddock was unlucky in being disabled 



Bkooklyn vs. 



Kennedy j^^;,^^; 

^^®^" (Lost. 

^-^ IS 

Haddock IS 

Sl^arrott { J^' 

^^^" (Lost. 

*^^^^^ (Lost. 



Eastern Clu 


BS. 


Western Clfbs. 


i2 


ai 





t 





i 

s 


d 


a 


M 


i 




a 


a 
a 


& 


2 
'3 




> 


ai 


,03 


§ 




4> 


■5 


s 

*! 







<u 


a 


s 


1 T 





n 


H 


(-> 








M 


H 


S 


^ 





CJ 


02 


►J 


H 





^ 


1 


2 


2 





2; 


7 


4 


2 


2 


3 


4 


3 


IS 


25 


,581 


2 


3 


2 


1 


1 


9 


1 


3 


2 





2 


1 


9 


18 




2 


2 


3 


1 


^ 


n 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


819 


,576 


2 


2 


1 


3 


1 


9 


1 





2 


] 


1 





6 14 







U 








1 


1 





1 





1 


1 


2 


5 


6 


.500 


1 





1 





0, 


2 


1 


1 


2 











4 


6 




1 


1 





1 


2 


^\ 


1 


1 


1 











3 


8 


.444 


3 








3 





^i 


1 


1 





1 





1 


4 


10 







1 











1 


1 











1 


1 


3 


4 


j.364 








1 








1 





2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


6 


7 










1 








1 










1 


1 








3 


.333 





u 


1 


2 


1 


4 








1 








1 


2 


6 



















" 


























'.000 











1 





1 

















1 


1 


2 


1 



t^o 



'ALDING S OFFICIAT, 



AGAINST THE EaST. 


AGAINST THE WhST. 


PITCHERS. 


w 

n 




L 

9 
1 
6 
9 
2 
4 
1 


P 

20 
2 
11 
16 
3 
5 
1 


Per 

ct. 

.550 

.oOol 
.455 
.438' 
.333 
.200 
.000 


PITCnERS. 


1 

18 
8 
5 
2 
3 
3 



LJP 
9 27 


Per 

ct. 


Stein 


1 Kennedy 

1 Stein 

Daub 

Lovetr 

Haddock 


fi67 


Slianott , 

Haddock 


5 
4 

I 

a 


13 
9 
4 
7 
Q 


.615 

556 


Kennedy 


500 


Daub 


4W 


Lovett 


Sharrott 

Crane 


333 


Crane 


1 


1 


.000 







( 


5R 


AND 


TOTAL. 








PITCHERS. 


_ 

25 
19 
6 

8 


L 

n 

10 


P 

43 
33 
12 
18 


Per 
ct. 

.581 
.576 
.500 
.444! 


PITCHERS. 


w 

4 
3 




L 

6 
2 


^\T 


Remiedv 


Sharrott 


111.364 


Stein 


Lovett 


91.333 


Daub 


Crane 


2[.000 


Haddock 









at critical times, besides which he incurred the dislike of 
most of the occupants of the bleachery boards because of 
his gentlemanly conduct. The rough element prefer rough 
players like themselves almost invariably, though now and 
then there are exceptional instances, especially in the League 
pitching arena, there having been fewer of that class 
among the League pitchers of 1S93 than ever before. It 
was a close thing between these two intelligent and effec- 
tive pitchers, Kennedy and Stein, for the lead in the Brook- 
lyn club's record. Daub and Haddock standing next in order. 
The record in full appears on page 49. 



THE BALTIMORE CLUB S PITCHING RECORD. 

The leading quartette of pitchers of the Baltimore club for 
1 893 were not very successful against the six leading teams in 
the race, as their aggregate record of 1 5 victories pitched in 
against 26 defeats fully shows ; but they were effective against 
the six tail enders,by an aggregate of 27 victories pitched in to 
13 defeats, this being the aggregate record in percentage fig- 
ures of McMahon, McNabb, Mullane and Hawke. Mullane 
improved in his box work after leaving the Cincinnatis, and 
Hawke proved to be an acquisition, and Schmidt did good 
service, the former making a record in one game. Schmidt 
led against the eastern teams, with Mullane second and 
McMahon third; the latter leading against the western 
teams, with McNabb second and Schmidt third. Baker and 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



5^ 



Wadsworth were of little use. The two Macs were the 
leading pit jhers in the aggregate. Here is th© record in full: 



Baltimore ts 



s^-mku JS 

McMahon {[^^"J- 

McNabb itZ 

Mun^ne....- jK: 

H-X^ IS 

«^'-- IK- 

^•'"'«''°«" iK' 



Eastern Clubs. 







Western Clubs. 



be "« 



1 

1 2 
13 23 

16 
3 
3 

12 

11:15 

Tjll 

9,17 

2 3 
7|lO 
Oj 

o! 2 



o2 



.600 
,590 
,500 
,444 
,393 
.231 
.000 



SUMMARY. 



Against the East. 


Against the West. 


PITCHERS. 


w 

2 
6 

10 
5 

4 
1 



L 

1 
4 

I 

8 
3 
2 


3 

10 
19 
10 
12 

t 


Per 
ct. 

.667 
.600 
.526 
.500 
.332 
.250 
.000 


PITCHERS. 


w 

13 
3 

1 
7 
6 
2 

n 


L P 

7 20 
3 6 

1 2 

9 le 

1117 

7 9 

2 2 


Per 
ct. 


Schmidt 


McMahon 


650 


Mullane 


McNabb 


500 


McMalion 


Schmidt 


500 


McNabb 


Hawke 


438 


Hawke 


Mullane 


353 


Baker. ... 


Baker 


.222 


Wadswortli 


Wadswortli .... 


000 

















GR 


A.ND 


TOTAL. 










pitchers. 


w 

1 

23 

8 

12 


L P 

16 49 

slie 

15 '27 


Per 

ct. 

.600 
.590 
.500 
.444 


pitchers. 


w 

n 

3 




L 

17 
10 
2 


P 

13 
2 


Per 

ct. 


Schmidt. 


Hawke 


393 


McMahon 

McNabb 

Mullane 


Baker 

Wadsworth 


.2.31 
.000 



THE CHICAGO CLUB S PITCHING RECORD. 

Manager Anson's pitching experiments in 1893 were any- 
thing but successful; three of the eleven pitchers he tried 
in the box pitching in an aggregate of 91 games out of the 127 
of the season, the other eight pitching in but 43 games. 



52 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



The pitching experiments, in fact, were the weak features 
of the club management of the Chicagoes last year. McGill, 
Mauck and Hutchison did the brunt of the box work of the 
Chicagoes last season, Donnelly bearing off the palm in per- 
centage of victories, with Clausen second, all the others 
being low down in percentage figures, as the appended 
pitching record shows: 



Chicago vs. 



Shaw 

Donnelly.. 
Clausen . . . 

McGill 

Mauck 

Hutchison 

Abbey 

Griffith . . . 
McGinnis. 
Hnghey. . . 
T. Parrott. 





^^ 


'kst'n Ci.ubs. 


Eastern Clubs. 


^ 


















ee 








fl 






bC' 


■6 


^ 


.2 


« 






9) 


c 


>. 


i 


o 




g 




"x 


01 

> 

4) 


'3 


5 


1 


.2 

o 


1 






i6 


i 


1 

1 


1 


X3 

i 










~o 


02 







H 






a, 



'A 



~o 


« 




H 

1 


1 


1 Won. 


( Lost. 









































01 


( Won. 
(Lost. 














1 


1 














1 


1 


2 


3 
































1 





1 


1 


1 Won. 














0, 





1 


2 


2 











5 


5 


\ Lost. 




















1 








1 





1 


3 


3 


3 Won. 
iLost. 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


6 





1 


1 


1 


4 


4 


11 


17 


3 


3 





3 


2 


11 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 





6 


17 


( Won. 
Lost. 





1 


1 





1 


3 





1 


2 





1 


1 


5 


8 


1 





2 


3 





6 





1 


1 








1 


3 


9 


( Won. 


2 


2 


2 


1 


3 


10 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


6 


16 


1 Lost. 


4 


3 


1 


2 





10 


4 


3 


1 


3 


2 


1 


14 


24 


1 Won. 




















1 





1 








1 


3 


3 


1 Lost. 


1 


1 








1 


3 


1 








1 








2 


5 


\ Won. 

















•0 





1 














! 1 


1 


( Lost. 


(» 




















1 














i 1 


1 


( Won. 
\ Lost. 








1 








1 











1 








! 1 


2 





J 


2 








3 


1 





1 





1 





! 3 


6 


1 Won. 

















ol 




















1 





1 Lost. 














1 


1 























1 


1 Won. 




















o!o 




















) Lost. 








2 


1 





3 











1 








1 


4 



CO 



.500 
.471 
.400 
.375 
.500 
.250 
.000 



SUMMARY. 



AGAINST THE EAST. 


AiiAiNST THE West. 


PITCHERS. 


w 

1 
2 
11 
5 
A 

\ 

1 




L 



1 

6 
3 
3 
2 

3 


1 


1 
3 
17 
8 

J 

4 


1 


Per 
ct. 

1.000 
.667 
.647 
.62.-) 
.625| 
.600! 
.500 
.300^ 
.250 
.000 
.000 


prrcHJERS. 


w 

10 
6 
1 








lIp Per 

! ct. 


Shaw 


Donnelly. 


o| 1 1 ooo 


Dotiiieliv 


Hutchison 


io;2o 

11,17 

3 4 





1 1 

3 3 

3; 3 

i 


Rno 


McGill.." 

Clausen 

Mauck 


McGill 

McGinuis 

Shaw 

Cluusei) 

Griffith 


.353 
.250 
.000 


Abbey 


.000 


Griffith 


.000 


Ilutchisiai 

McGinnis 

Huprhey 

T. Parrott 


Hughey 

Ai)bey 

T. Parrott 


.0(K) 
.000 
.000 







BASE BALL GUIDE. 



53 



GRAND TOTAL. 



PITCHERS. 



Shaw . . . 
Donnelly 
Clausen . 
McGill. . . 
GriffltU . . 
Mauck... 



w 


L 


P 


Per 
ct. 




1 





1 


1.000 


I 


3 


1 


4 


.750 


i 


5 


3 


8 


.625 


, 


17 


17 


34 


.500 


: 


1 


1 


2 


.500 


' 


8 


9 


17 


.471 





PITCHERS. 

Hutchison 

Abbey 

McGihnis 

Huffhey 

T. Parrott 



w 


L 


' 


16 


24 


40 


3 


5 


3 


2 


6 


8 





1 


1 





4 


4 



Per 

ct. 

,400 
.375 
.250 
.000 
.000 



THE ST. LOUIS CLUB S PITCHING RECORD. 

A. Clarkson, a brother of the veteran Clarkson, carried 
off the pitching honors in the St. Louis club of 1893, though 
the colt pitcher Brietenstein was close to him in the club 
record, as the appended tables will show. Clarkson led in 
percentage of victories against the eastern teams, with . 700 
to Brietenstein' s . 529 ; but against the western teams Gleason 
took the lead, by the percentage figures of .462 to .455 each 
by the other two, Hawley being four in both records. In 
the whole campaign, though, Clarkson led with. 571 to Briet- 
enstein's .487 and Gleason's .457, Hawley being fourth with 
but .227, Hawke, Bannon and Dolan not winning a game. 
Clarkson was effective against Cincinnati and Chicago 
teams and against the Phillies; but Brietenstein was the 
most effective of the two against Pittsburgh and New York, 
Gleason excelling against Philadelphia and Chicago, but he 
was an easy victim of Boston and Pittsburgh. Hawley only 
succeeded against the tail enders. Here is the record in full : 



St. Louis vs. 



^•Clarkson {'^^H 

Brietenstein I [^*^^- 

«'«»^»° ;S- 

Hawley ) S 

Hawke 'Won. 

( Lost. 

"^i""" IS; 

"<"»•■■ -;K: 



West'n Clubs. 


Eastern 


Clubs. 


1 
P 

a 


si 


a 


a 
'3 




1 




d 


.i 

% 





d 






a 


c 

S 

be 

a 

03 


M 

■^ 




<u 


a 


.£2 







n 


a 


'<o 


^ 


Ki 







^ 


Ph 





-) 





hJ 


H 


33 


^ 


'^ 


cq 


M 




H 





1 




2 


2 


1 


7 





2 


1 


1 





1 


5 


12 


2 













8 


2 


1 


1 





1 


1 


6 


9 


2 




1 


3 


2 


9 


1 


3 


2 


1 


1 


2 


10 


19 


] 




1 


2 





8 


3 





1 


4 


3 


1 


12 


20 







2 


3 


3 


9 


1 


3 


1 


2 


2 


3 


12 


21 


2 


3 


4 


1 


1 


n 


4 


1 


4 


2 


1 


2 


14 


25 











1 


2 


3 

















2 


2 


5 


3 





2 





2 


7 


1 


1 


2 


2 


4 





10 


17 
























































1 


1 























1 












































1 














1 























1 















































1 











1 





1 














1 


2 



.571 

.487 



.227 
.000 



,000 
000 



54 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



SUMMARY. 



AGAINST THE EaST. 






Against the West. 






PITCHERS. 


w 

9 
9 
3 





L 

3 
8 
11 

1 
1 
1 


P 

10 
17 
20 
10 

1 
1 
1 


Fer 

ct. 

.too! 

.529: 
.450; 


riTcnERs. 


w 

12 
10 
5 
2 





L 

14 
12 
6 
10 


1 


P 

26 

22 
11 
It 


1 


Per 
ct. 


A.'Clarksoii 


Gleason 

Brietenstein 

A. Clark.soii . 


46"' 


BrietensteiD 


4'i'i 


Gleasou 


^S". 


Hawley 


.SOOIlawlev 

000 I Hnwki' 


167 


Hawke 


000 


Baunou 

Dolau 


.000 ! 
.000, 


Baunon 

Dolau 


.000 
.00<J 







GRAND 


rOTALS. 










PITCHER.S. 


w 

12 
19 
21 
5 


L 

9 
20 
25 
17 


P 

21 
49 
46 
22 


Per 

ct. 

.571 

.487 

.457 
.227 


pitchers;. 






L 

1 
1 


p 

1 

1 

2 


Per 
ct. 


A. Clarkson 


Ilawke 


000 


Brietenstein 


Bannon 


000 


Gleason 


Dolan 


(►00 


Hawlev 











THE LOUISVILLE CLUB S PITCHING RECORD. 

The Louisville club tried nine pitchers in 1893, of which 
four pitched in 105 games out of the club's record of 125 
games; viz., Hemming, Menefee, Stratton and Rhodes. 
Hemming was the most effective against the eastern teams, 
and Rhodes against the western. Kilroy came in towards 
the clo.se of the season, and in five games got the leading 
percentage figures of the season, .600; Hemming and Mene- 
fee tieing for second place with , 500 each, and Stratton and 
Whitrock for third place with ,333 each. The others did 
not do much, as the record on page 55 shows. 

THE WASHINGTON CLUb's PITCHING RECORD. 

The tail end team of the League for 1893 had a very 
good quartette of pitchers in its team ranks in Duryea, 
Meaken, Esper and Maul; but the pitching support was not 
up to the miu'k for one thing, besides which it was only in 
exceptional instances that the pitchers had catchers to suit 
them so as to work together as effective battery teams. 
Esper was the most effectiv® against the eastern teams and 
Duryea agaixst the western, the latter doing the best pitch- 
ing against the two leaders, Boston and Pittsburgh; but 
singularly enough he could do nothing with the tail end 
teams. Meaken did his best against the New York team, 
and Esper his best against the Baltimores, while neither 
succeeded against the Brooklyns. Maul was effective 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



55 



LOl'ISVILLE VS. 



"'-^ IK- 

«<»"■»">« .-{S- 

"<=«'«" JS 

^'-0^ IK- 
S'-"- :s- 

■"><-- ;s- 

Oaussen >^ 

■^"'-e^ ;K- 

LucM .;S- 



■:3 a o 



iu 



West'n Clubs. 


Eastern 


Clubs. 


3 


JZi 






















i 




bC 


'fi 


CS 




:n 






& 




a 


;-i 


be 




a 


1 




a 


be 


3 

3 


1 


p 
o 


-a 




o 


c 


1 




■>^ 


0* 


a 


X2 




^ 


o 


■:2 


i^ 


"5 






S 


Cu 


o 


o 


O 


CO 




2Q 


SJ 


^ 


M 


ca 


H 


O 





























1 


] 


1 


3 


3 























2 














2 


2 


'2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


9 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


9 


18 


8 








1 


1 


5 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


1 


13 


18 


1 


1 


1 








3 


1 


1 








1 


2 


s 


8 





1 





1 


1 


3 


1 





1 


2 





1 


5 


8 




















•0 


1 











1 




2 




















1 





2 





1 


o! 


4 


4 


1 





2 


2 


1 


6 








3 


2 


1 


0' 


fi 


12 


2 


2 


2 


1 


3 


10 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


o 


14 


24 





1 








1 


2 





1 











2| 


3 


ft 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


11 


1 














01 


1 


12 














1 


1 























] 


1 





1 





1 


3 























3 
































1 





1 


1 











1 





1 


1 








1 








2 


3 



































f>; 














1 








1 

















o! 





1 



©if 

. o 



.600 
.500 
.500 
.333 
.333 
.294 
.250 
.250 
.000 



SUMMARY. 



AGAINST THE EAST. 


Against the West. 


PITCHERS. 


w 

9 
3 
6 
1 
2 





L 

5 
3 

10 
3 

11 

1 
1 


P 

14 
6 

16 
i 

13 

1 
1 


Per 

ct. 

.643 
.500 
.375 
•250 
.154 
.000 
.000 
.000 


PITCHERS. 


w 

3 
3 
5 
9 
1 
2 
6 




L 

1 
2 
5 

13 
2 
4 

14 




P 

4 

5 

10 

22 

3 

6 

20 






Per 

ct. 


Hemming 


Rhod-js 


.750 
600 


Meuefee 


Kilroy 


Stratton 


MeRefee 


500 


Claussea 


Hemming 

Rhines 


409 


Rlv^^es 


333 


Whitrock 


Vv'hitrock 


333 


Rhines 


^tratton 


300 


Lucid 


Claussen 


000 




Lucid 


.000 



GRAND TOTAL. 



Kilroj ! 3| 2 

Hemming 18 18 

Meuefee i 8| 8 

Stratton [12 24 

Wliitrock i 2! 4 



Per 



PITCHERS. 


w 

6 

1 

I 


L 

12 
3 
3 

1 


P 

17 
4 
4 

1 


Pe^ 
ct.^ 


Riiodes 


294 


Claussen 


2£0 


Rliines 


.250 


Lucid 


0^0 







S6 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



against St, Louis only, while Stockdale, Stephens and Graff 
were of little use. Here is the record in full: 



Washington vs. 



—y- ]S 

■M^l^™ IK 

Esper &: 

^- -IS 

^-'"•^■--Oale rS 

St'Ph'^n^ l5; 

^"^^"^ ll^St. 



Kastern Clubs. 


Western Clubs. 




3 

2 


.2 
ft 




a 




i 


i 

1 


"2 

S 


1 


g 


CD 

s 
o 




en 


O 


J2 


<u 


1- 


Tl 


o 








w 


o 


o 




23 


0. 


^/?; 


23 


23 


H 


-■ 


CJ 


:j 


5 


C/J 


-3 


H 


u 


1 








1 





2 


1 





1 





1 





8 


5 








1 


1 


1 


3 


1 








1 


1 


2, 


5 


8 


1 


1 


3 





2 


7 





1 


1 








1 


3 10 1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 ,10 


1 


1 


1 


3 





1 


7;17 


1 


3 








3! 7 


1 





1 


1 





2 


! 5 12 


2 


2 


2 


3 


9 


4 


4 


3 


2 


3 


1 


17 26 


1 





1 


2 


4 








1 


2 


3 





6 10 


o 


2 


2 


2 


2 10 


3 


3 


3 


2 


1 


1 


13 23 


1 





1 








2 

















o| 





2 


1 


1 








1 


3 





1 





1 


2 


1 


5 


8 



































1 


1 


1 














1 


1 





2 








1 


2 


6 


6 















































1 











1 

















o' 





li 



o « 



.385 
.370 



.316 



,200 
143 



000 



SUMMARY. 



Agalnst the East. 






Against the WEsr. 






PITCHERS. 


w 

7 
7 
2 

4 




L 

9 
10 
3 
3 
10 
1 
1 


P 

16 
17 
5 
5 
14 
1 
1 


Per 

ct. 

.438 
.412 
.400 
.400 
.'286 
.000 
.000 


PITCHERS. 


1 

3 
5 

1 




L 

4 
i 


5 


P 

8 
19 
10 
22 
6 

5 


Per 
ct. 


Esper 

Meakeii 

Uurvea . . . 


I Dmvea 


37S 


iMaul 

Meakeu .. 


.316 
300 


Stockdale 

Maul 

Stephens 

(Jraff 


Esper 

Stephens 

(Jrafl-. 

Stockdale 


.227 
.167 
.000 
000 

















GRAND 


TOTAL. 










PITCHERS. 


W L 

t 

5 8 
10 17 
12 26 
10 23 


P 

13 
27 
38 
33 


Per 

ct. 

.385; 

.370 
.316! 
.303i 


PrrCHERS. 


w 

_ 

2 

1 



L 

] 


P 


Per 

ct. 


Inirvea . 


Stockdale 

Stephens 

Graff. 


200 


Meakiu 


143 


Esper 


.000 


Maul 























The League pitchers of 1893 were handicapped, to a 
more or less extent, by the new rule governing the delivery 
of the ball, which was adopted at the Spring meeting of the 
League in that year, and which increased the distance 
between the pitcher's box and the home plate from fifty-five 
feet to sixty feet. This was not much of a change in the 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 5 7 

way of lessening the power of the pitcher to throw a swift 
ball to the bat, but it had a material effect on the delivery 
of pitchers, who were well practised in special curves in 
their delivery, and then had to practice new methods in 
order to get the curved ball over the plate. Some lost the 
efficiency of their curves under the increased distance, but 
the majority rather improved their work by it, especially 
the strategic class. 

THE BATTING OF 1893. 

There is no questioning the fact that the batting depart- 
ment of the game is far behind the point of excellence 
reached in the fielding department, as also in the " battery" 
work and the base running. The cause of this lies chiefly 
in the failure of teams to devote as much time and attention 
to effective batting practice as they do to practice in pitch- 
ing, fielding and base running. Look at the hours wasted 
each day of a match in practicing ''fiingo " hitting in order 
to give the fielders practice, in which the batsmen hit at 
balls falling perpendicularly to the ground, while in the game 
proper they face balls which come to the bat on a horizontal 
line. It is absurd to expect improvement in batting while 
this old rutty style of batting practice is indulged in. 
Proper training practice at the bat can only follow the plan 
of pitching the balls to the bat, and not by batting at balls 
dropping from the air. 

Of course, this "fungo" practice is interesting to the 
crowd, from the excellent practice it gives the fielders ; but 
if a practice pitcher was placed in the box to deliver balls to 
the bat, not only would practice be given to the fielders, but 
also practice in base running in batsmen running to first 
base, besides which the batsmen would be afforded oppor- 
tunities to practice place hitting. 

Considerable improvement was shown in the League 
arena in the batting department of the game in 1893 over 
the work done in '92, but there still remains an ample field 
for further advance in the art of batting. More attention, 
however, was given to what is termed scientific batting, last 
year, than ever before; the best field captains of '93 mak- 
ing more of a speciality of ^eam work at the bat than a 
majority of their predecessors had ever attempted to do. 

Nevertheless skillful handling of the ash, with the sole end 
in vie\v of forwarding runners on the bases, was at a pre- 
mium in '93, the majority of batsmen going in for tne old 
method of chance hitting and for what is technically called 
" fungo" hitting, viz., hitting the ball'high in the air to the 
out-field, a style of play in batting which is fruitful in yield- 



58 Spalding's official 

ing chances for catches ; and the rule is that the more such 
chances are given in a match the weaker the batting. 

To "play for the side," in handhng the bat, is to make 
the hits tell all the time in forwarding runners o?i bases; 
it is that which constitutes team work at the bat, and that 
only. The features of scientific batting are ''place hit- 
tz'ng,'' '' facing for position," ''bunting" the ball and 
" sacrifice " /iitti?ig, and each and all of these specialties in 
batting are potent factors in run getting; and the batting 
which tells most on the score is that which is most effective 
in forwarding runners, and not that which runs up a bats- 
man's base hit averages to high figures. The true art of 
batting is shown when the batsman goes to the bat with the 
sole purpose of forwarding the runners on the bases. Then 
it is that place hitting — the perfection of the art — comes 
into play with telling effect. What constitutes place hitting 
is the ability to send the ball out of the fair reach of the 
fielders, with the least expenditure of strength i?t base 
ru7tni?ig. The model hits, in this respect, which are needed 
when a runner is on a base, include first, a safe tap.oi the 
ball over the heads of thein-fielders, and not far enough out 
to afford the out-lielders a chance for a catch ; secondly, a 
hard hit "daisy cutter" along the ground, or a twisting- 
hard hit '* bou7ider" just out of fair reach of the in- fielders ; 
thirdly, a bunted ball, so skillfully hit as to make it difficult 
for either the pitcher or third baseman to field the ball in 
time to put the runner out at the bat; fourthly a hot 
" liner" just above the heads of the in-fielders and too low 
for an out -field catch; fourthly, a telling "sacrifice" hit, 
made while striving for a base hit — for no sensible batsman 
purposely hits a ball to have himself put out ; and lastly, 
the try for a homer over the heads of the out-fielders, only 
admissible when the bases are full and a desperate chance has 
to be made; for the 120 sprint run which every homer costs 
is too exhausting in its effects to be indulged in except in 
special cases. 

The weak points in batting include, first, going up to the 
bat to slug at a swiftly pitched ball with all your force, in 
order to make a chance hit to the deep out-field; secondly, 
liitting at the ball without judgment as to its pace or 
direction, merely trusting to chance, and to hitting hard 
from the shoulder, as to whether the ball is sent high in 
the air or not hit at all. One of the most stupid plays at 
the bat is that of hitting hard from the shoulder at swiftly 
pitched balls, thereby deadening the elasticity of the ball ; 
a quick, sharp tap of a swift ball frequently sends the ball 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 59 

safely on a line to the out field, when a " slugged " ball, hit 
from a shoulder-swing, goes up in the air, and as a rule, 
gives a chance for a catch. The most difficult hit to make 
is to earn a base by a skilful "bunt." The easiest hit is a 
homer, which the veriest novice at the bat can make, when 
he could no more tap a swiftly pitched ball safely, or earn 
a base by a bunt, than he could fly. Of course, place 
hitting is a difficult thing to do, but it is what all batsmen 
should aim to excel in. One of the greatest mistakes made 
by managers when selecting players for their teams each 
Spring, is to choose them for their high figures in base hit 
averages. The datsman who has the best average of 
ricnners forwarded by base hits, is the bats7nan who 
most helps to win games, not the one who excels in mere 
base hit averages, and the former is the one to select. 

In one of the chapters on batting in Spalding's " How to 
Play Base Ball" is the following article: 

" In no department of the game are more facilities oflered for strategic 
play than in batting; but it requires an intelligent player to engage in it 
successfully. The batsman wVo would be invariably successful must 
riesort to strategy, for if he depends solely upon a quick eye and a strong 
arm he will fail. These are very excellent as aids, but a comparatively 
poor dependewce to place your trust in altogether. The bafsman, when 
he takes his bat in hand, finds opposed to him nine men, and thougli to the 
casual observer it may s-vem a very easy undertaking to bat a ball out of 
the reach of only nine men, covering as large a space as a four or five acre 
field, yet when you come to face nine experienced and active fielders, you 
will soon be taught to realize the fact that ' lieadwork ' is as important an 
element of success in batting as it is* in pitching; and you will then see 
that to eara bases on hits, and thereby to score runs, you will have to play 
' points ' pretty successfully." 

Further on the writer says : 

" Fr t)m the rxoment the batsman takes his stand at the bat, to the time he 
strikes a fair ball, he sliould stanel in proper form for hitting at every 
ball, or he will be sure to be caught napping by a skilful pitcher, and find 
himself retiring from a tip, a poorly hit bull, or from called strikes, instead 
of taking a well earned base. This proper form for a hit is important. It 
is fatiguing, ef course, to stand still and keep prepared for hitting, while 
ball aft/jr ball is sent in out of reach; but it must be done in order to secure 
chances for hitting the ball you want when it does come. A skilf>:l pitcher 
is always ©n the alert to find the batsman ' out of form,' and not prepared 
to hit, and the moment he sees him thus standing ' on the loose,' he is sure 
to send him a geod ball, and the batsman either strikes at it hastily or lets 
it go by Mm, only to see the ball fielded easily, or a strike called on him." 

Again, too, in commenting on the strong point in batting 
of standing ready to meet the ball properly, the writer says : 

" How often do we see batsman go to the bat, one after the other, and 
as they take their stand, get into fair form for the first two or three balls, 
and then, on finding that the pitcher's delivery is rather wild, stand at ease, 
asit>were, quite unprepared to hit in proper form, only to see the ball 
come in '»ver the base, and at the height indicated, while they either fail 
to strike at it or miss the ball if they do, simply because they did not stand 
prepared to meet it, or, in other werds, were not in form for batting. The 



6o Spalding's official 

moment a ?hrewd, strategic pitclier sees a batsman standing at the bat in 
bad form,he feels sure of captuiiug him. On the other haad, it bothers 
the best pitchers to see the batsman untiring in his eiTorts to stand in good 
form in his position, and fully prepared to meet every ball pitched to him. 
This' proper form' for hitting every ball is, of course, fatiguing to tiie 
batsman, when the pitching is at all wild, but it mast be kept up in «vrder 
to secure chances for hitting the ball when it comes withiii fair reach of 
the bat." 

In making batting a feature of a team play, too much 
attention is paid to out-field hitting, and in doing this the 
importance of economizing a player's strength va running 
bases after a hit is entirely lost sight of. The ambition to 
excel in home run hitting leads the batsman to forget that 
every such run involves the costly expenditure of physical 
strength consequent upon run7iing a 120 yards at one s 
utmost speed, a test cf strength in sprint running which 
ordinarily requires a good half hour's rest to recuperate 
from the trying effort. How much more effective is it, in 
the saving of strength, to earn single bases by hits, than 
four bases at a time by a homer. Then, too, in the case of 
home rt&ns, all the attractive features of fine fielding are 
sacrificed, which single base hitting- so frequently yields. 

Suppose the first four batsmen sent to the bat each make 
home runs, the result is a score of 4 runs, without a chance 
offered to the fielders for sharp fielding, all of them, except 
the «ne out-fielder going after the ball, standing idle as 
lookers on at the doings of four 120 yard sprint run- 
ners. Suppose, however, that the first four batsmen each 
make single hits, the res'^lt is one clean earned run to begin 
with, with three men on bases, and at the lowest estimate, not 
counting for the sharp base running, the chances are that 
the other three runs would follow before six men had gone 
to the bat ; and with ihis single base hitting there would 
follow chance after chance for all the attractive features of 
sharp in-fielding and active base running in stealing bases. 
In fact there is no comparison in the two methods of batting, 
the strewgth-saving method of single base hitting being in 
every way preferable. 

AN INTERESTING CLUB RECORD. 

An interesting analysis of the play of the twelve clubs 
for the season of 1393, is shown in the appended table, in 
which the total figures of runs scored, sacrifice hits made, 
bases stolen, "battery" and fielding errors committed, as 
also the base hit and fielding averages of each club for the 
entire season, are given. The names of the clubs are given 
in the order of their relative position at the end of the pen- 
nant race : 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



6i 



Clubs. 



Boston 

Pittsburgh... 
Cleveland. . . 
Philadelphia. 
New York... 
Cincinaati. . 
Br09klyn . . , . 

Baltimore 

Chicago 

at. Louis. . . . 

Louisville 

Washington . 





o ^ o 


g 3 S 

>q-( ^ 




s ^ s 








.272 


1,003 


7-98 


313 


223 


.921 


78 


350 


.319 


662 


7-36 


360 


210 


.925 


70 


347 


.314 


9U 


7-41 


323 


236 


.918 


83 


375 


.308 


988 


7-88 


301 


213 


.929 


60 


336 


.292 


887 


7-29 


255 


313 


.903 


121 


386 


.25.5 


778 


5-82 


245 


237 


.928 


80 


316 


.270 


793 


6-03 


243 


205 


.912 


77 


405 


.367 


774 


6-27 


275 


237 


.910 


116 


3S6 


.285 


834 


6-58 


332 


283 


.907 


79 


422 


.261 


665 


5-48 


175 


196 


.910 


104 


372 


.284: 


767 


6-09 


283 


. Ib2 


.917 


67 


318 


.265 


703 


5-65 


207 


130 


.904 


77 


470 



It is a significant fact that the Boston team, which won 
the pennant, had a base hit average of but .272 to the tail 
end club's base hit average of .265 ; but in total runs scored 
the champions led by a score of 1,003 to the tail end club's 
-703. This shows what little use the mere fij^ures of the 
batting average of base hits areinestimatingthe value of the 
batting in winning games. What is wanted are the figures 
showing the average of base hits made by which runners 
are forwarded, not the average of base hits alone ; as a bats- 
man may be way up in his average figures of base hits alone, 
and yet, as a team worker at the bat in forwarding runners 
by his base hits, he may be the occupant of a comparatively 
low position in the latter averages. 

In battery errors, New York, Baltimore and St. Louis 
were " way off" in comparison with the three leaders in the 
race. In fielding errors, Washington had the poorest 
record, with Chicago and Brooklyn next in order in being 
charged with large figures in the error column. In stolen 
bases, New York led Boston by 313 to 223 ; but it was Bos- 
ton's combination of teamwork batting and base stealing 
that beat New York's record. In sacrifice hitting Pitts- 
burgh led. 

THE BASE RUNNING OF 1893. 

There is no questioning the fact that more skillful base 
running was done in the League arena in i8q3 than ever 
before. The brainy managers and captains of the League 
clubs have learned by experience that skillful base running 
is a very potent element of success in winning pennants, 
and more attention is being paid by managers to having 
good base runners in their teams than hitherto. Of course, 
to make base running thoroughly aEective £-ood team werk 



62 Spalding's official 

at the bat must be combined with it, and the Boston cham- 
pions of 1893 practically exemplified this important point 
very finely. John M. Ward in commenting on the Boston's 
team work play in this respect, said: 

" I have never, in my twelve years' experience on the diamond, seen such 
skilll'iil playing. The Boston players use more heac-lwork and signals than 
.;ny otlier team in the country, and that alone is tiio reason why they can 
■vrin the championship with such apparent ease. McCarthy is lli« chief 
schemer. He is the man who has introduced this new style of play into the 
team and he has been ably assisted by Nash, Dully, Long, Lowe and Car- 
roll. Tliese men have the utmost contidence in one another's ability to 
carry out instructions, and they work together as one man. ' Team work in 
the iield' used to be a prime factor in a pennant winning team, but now 
' team work at the bAt ' is the latest wrinkle, and the P.ostons have it dewn 
fine. One thing that his facilitated their innovation is an ability to hat 
scientificallij and run bases nio)-e swiftly than players of other teams. But 
to this ability must be added headwork, a complete system of signals, and 
conlidence in themselves and one another. I have made a study of the 
play of this team, and I find that they have won many games by scoring 
nearly twice as many runs as they made Iiits. " 

The fact was that the Boston fream led all the clubs in 
total runs scored, their average of runs per game being 7-gS 
and their total runs 1,003, the tail end teams figures in run- 
getting being 5-65 average and 703 total. This shows how 
valuable the combination is. Ward, in his description 
of the strong play of the Boston team in their combination 
of team-work play at the bat with brainy base running, says : 

"Say, for i nstance, that they have a man on first and nebody out. Under 
the old St \ le of play a sacritice would be the pruper thing. Then tiie man 
on first would reach second while the batsman was put out. The Bostons, 
however, workthis sciicme: The man on lirst makes a bluilattei/.pt to steal 
second, but runs back tu first. By this it becomes known whether the 
second baseman or the short stop is going to cover second for the throw 
from the catcher. Then the batsman gets a signal from the man on first 
that he is going to steal on a certain pitched ball. Tiie moment he starts 
for second the batsman just pushes tiie ball for the place occupied only a 
moment before by tiie innelder who has gone to cover second base. That 
is, if the second baseman covers the b^gthe batter pushes the Ijall slowly to 
right field; if it is the short stop, tlie ball is pushed to left field. Of course, 
it takes a skillful l>atter to do this, l)Ut they have such hitters on Ike Boston 
nine. Now, wlien that ball is pushed to the outlield, the man who has 
already started to steal second just keeps right on to third, while the bats- 
man is safe at first. Then the trick is trieil over again and in most cases 
successfully. Tlie man on first makes an(jtlior liluir to steul, and when the 
batsman learns who is to cover second liase he pushes the ball out again, 
the man on tliird scoring, the man on first reaching third, and the batsman, 
gainnig first.'" 

"^ In Spalding's book on " How To Play Base Ball," the 
editor has this to say on the art of base running: 

" Each season's experience only shows more and more the fact that good 
liase running is one of the most important essentials of su(;cess in winning^ 
games. Eil'cctive pitching is a great aid to success, s-) is skillful batting; 
but It is e(iually as necessary to a successful i.ssue of a contest after a base 
has been obtained by a goyd hit, that other ba.ses should be secured by 
skillful running of bases. It is a ditllcult task to get to first base safely in 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 6;^ 

the face of the effectual fire from a first-class club ' battery,' backed up by 
good support in the field; but it is still more difficult when the base is safely 
reached, to secure the other three bases. The fact Is, a greater degree of 
intelligence is required in the player who would excel in base running than 
is needed either in fielding or in batting. Any soft-brained lieavy weight 
can occasionally hit a ball for a home run, but it requires a shrewd, intelli- 
gent player, with his wits about him, to make a successful base runner. 
Indeed, base running is the most difficult work a player has to do in the 
game. To cover iuficld positioiis properly, a degree of intelligence in the 
players is required which the majority do not, as a general rule, possess; 
but to excel in base running such mental qualifications are required as 
only a small minority are feund to possess. Presence of mind, prompt 
action on the spur of the moment; quickness of perception, and coolness 
and nerve are among the requisites of a successful base runner. Players 
habitually accustomed to hesitate to do this, that, or the other, in attending 
to the varied points of a game, can never become good base runners. 
Thereissolittle time allowed to .iudge of the situation that prompt action 
becomes a necessity with the base runner. He must ' hurry up ' all the 
time. Then, too, he must be daring in taking risks, while at the same time 
avoiding recklessness in his running. Though fast running is an important 
aid in base running, a fast runner who lacks judgment, coolness, and, in 
fact, . headwork'in his running, will not equal a poor runner who pos- 
sesses the nerve and intelligence required for the work. The great point 
in the art of base running is to know when to start, and to start promptly 
when tlie favorable opportunity is offered. One difficulty a base runner, 
trying to steal to second, invariably encounters, is his having to watch 
either the pitcher or catcher closely. He cannot watch both carefully, and 
therefore he must make his selection as to which player he will look after. 
If the catclier is an accurate and swift thrower to the bases, he is the man 
to be attended to. But if the pitcher is one who has a method ©f delivery 
which includes a number of special movements wVich oi;cupymore than 
the ordinary time in delivering the ball, then he is the man to watch, for he 
will surely afford the runner the required opportunity to steal a base or to 
secure a balk, if the runner only plavs his part properly. A sharp base 
runner can bother a pitcher exceedingly by skillful dodging. It requires 
no small amount of nerve and coolness for a pitcher to watch a runner 
closely and yet to play the strategical points of his pitching with full effect.'' 

John Ward, who excelled all others in stealing bases in 
1893, in outlining his method of base running, says: 

"Having reached first I signal to the next batter when I am going to 
steal. Then, standing near the base, well upright, and with my Uet 
together, I try to get a running start on the pitcher; that is, when I think 
he is about to pitch, though he has yet made no motion, I make my start. 
If he does pitch I get all the ground that I would have had by playing off 
the base in the first place, and I have, besides, tMe advantage of being on 
the move. Everyone who knows anything of spriating will appreciate the. 
advantages of such a start. If the pitcher does not pitch I usually manage 
to return to the base in safety. Having secured my start, I expect that the 
batter will hit the ball, if it is a good one, into right field, in which case I 
will keep right on to third base ; or, if it is a bad ball, the batter will at least 
hit at it, in order, if possible, to blind the catciier, and help me out. In 
any event, I put down my head and run direct for the base, and in no case 
do I attempt to watch tlie ball. It is a foolish and often fatal mistake for a 
runner to keep hishead turned toward the catcher while running in another 
direction. If the ball is hit 1 listen for the coacher's direction, but if i t >:," 
not I keep my eye on the baseman, and by watching his movements, die 
expression of his face, and the direction he is looking, I can tell as cer- 
tainly just where the throw is going as though I saw the ball. If he stands 
in front of the line I run back of him, and if he is back of tlie line I slide in 
iront. In every case, and whether I go in head or feet foremost, I throw 



64 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 

my body away from the baseman so as to give him the least possible sur- 
face to touch with the ball.'' 

The leading college nine captains paid great attention to 
base running in^'lai^?. 1892 and '93, and more than equalled 
the professionals ill the art as a rula. The necessity for a 
combination of team work at the bat with base running 
is shown in the fact that, while the Boston champions led 
all the club teams in run-getting by a large majority, their 
team as a whole did not lead in stolen bases, New York 
having a total of 313 stolen bases to 223 by Boston ; but in 
averages of runs scored to a game, Boston led by 7-9S — 
nearly 8 runs to a game — to New York's 7-29, the difference 
in the figures being the result of New York's failure to com- 
bine team work in batting with their base running. 

BASE RUNNING RECORD. 

The record showing the list of players who had a base 
running record of 30 stolen bases and over during the 
season, taken from the official record of the batting aver- 
ages, is appended. The names of the players are given in 
the order of stolen bases; and where there are two or more 
equal in stolen bases, the lead is given to the player steal- 
ing the most bases in the fewest games. Added to the 
record of stolen bases, too, is that of total sacrifice hits, total 
runs, and the base hit and fielding average of each player 
included in the stolen base record, by which means a pretty 
fair estimate of his value as a player, alike in fielding, bat- 
ting and base running, can be arrived at. 

It is a singular fact that out of the forty-four Leagtie club 
pitchers who pitched in not less that fifteen games, there 
were no less than tweive who only stole a single base each, 
according to the official record, and there were nine who 
did not steal even one base, and the best record in this 
respect in the list of forty-four pitchers was Mullane's record 
of 8 stolen bases. 

Ward of New York heads the list of the base stealers of 
i893,7the first nine in base stealing being Ward. 2 B; Burke, 
L. F. ;Tom Brown, C. F. ; Latham, 3 B. ; Dowd, L. F. ; Davis, 
3 B. ; Ewing, R. F. ; Foutz, i B., and Brodie, C. F. In rim- 
getting the first nine in the base stealing record were Duffy, 
C. F. ; Long, S. S. ; Delahantv, C. F. ; Burkett, L. F. ; 
Van Haltren, C. F. ; Ward (Bait.) L. F. ; McGraw, L. F. ; 
Turke, L. F. ; Kelley (Bait.), C. F. Of these base stealers, 
too, the first nine in sacrifice hitting were, Pfeffer, 2 B. ; 
Donovan, R. F. ; Foutz, i B. ; Burkett, L. F. ; Tiernan, 
R. F. ; Glasscock, S. S. ; Nash, 3 B. ; Carroll, L. F. and 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



65 



Parrott, 3 B. In base hit averages of the leading base run- 
ners, Hamilton led with .395 ; and in fielding average Foutz 
led with .980. Here is the base running record in full: 



Tlayeks. 


i 



Clubs. 


i 



i 

IS 

1 


li 




II 


bcfco 


^ard 

Burke 


s. s. 

L. F. 
C. F. 

3B. 
L.F. 

3 B. 
R. F. 

IB. 
C. F. 
C. F. 
C.F. 

C. 
R.F. 

2 B. 
C.F. 

2 B. 
U F. 
L. F. 
R. F. 
L.F. 
S. S. 

s. s. 

L.F. 
C.F. 

s. s. 

R.F. 
R. F. 
C. F. 
C. F. 
C. F. 

s. s. 

2B. 

3B. 
S. S. 
2B. 
L.F. 
L. F. 
2B. 
3B. 

3 B. 


New York 

New York 

Louisville 


134 
135 
121 
125 
131 
133 
114 
130 
132 
130 
131 

80 
110 
116 

98 
126 

93 

82 
124 
116 
127 
114 
124 
124 
130 
118 
124 
132 
133 

91 
115 
124 
128 
128 
130 

49 
120 
127 
128 
113 


72 
67 
66 
60 
59 
54 
63 
62 
52 
51 
50 
49 
49 
49 
47 
43 
42 
41 
41 
40 
40 
39 
39 
38 
38 
37 
37 
36 
35 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
32 
31 
31 
31 
30 


40 
29 
22 
28 
21 
31 
35 
44 
28 
13 
39 
14 
46 
26 
14 
24 
39 
15 
43 
31 
15 
43 
44 
12 
22 
40 
19 
40 
31 
18 
38 
53 
41 
20 
26 
5 
41 
38 
26 
41 


129 

121 

104 

102 

114 

112 

116 

91 

89 

105 

149 

5:-) 

110 

92 

84 

97 

69 

111 

113 

108 

123 

81 

144 

120 

78 

62 

88 

145 

129 

63 

113 

85 

117 

149 

90 

50 

82 

102 

93 

55 


.348 
.289 
.253 
.296 
.294 
.373 
.371 
.272 
.342 
.259 
.378 
.322 
.331 
.288 
.304 
.306 
.318 
.395 
.327 
.360 
.328 
.347 
.372 
.312 
.247 
.238 
.228 
.370 
.350 
.253 
.311 
.269 
.304 
.294 
.297 
.273 
.234 
.307 
.251 
.252 


.925 
q'>4 


Tom Brov/n 


940 


Latham 


Cincinnati 


903 


Dowd , . . , 


St. Louis 


936 


Davis 


New York 

Cleveland 

Brooklyn 


895 


Ewing 


9-70 


Foutz 


980 




St. Louis 


966 


Hoy 


Washington 

Boston 


89^^ 


Dmry 


968 


Doyle 


New York 


964 


Pittsburgh 


930 


Lange ... 


Chicago 


889 


Griffin 

Daly 


Brooklyn 

Brooklyn 


.960 
915 


Wilmot ;..... 


Chicago 


866 


Hamilton 

Tiernan 


Philadelphia 

New York 


.940 

923 


McCarthy 


Boston 


905 


McGraw 


Baltimore 


896 


Glasscock 


Pittsburgh 


934 


Burkett , . . 


Cleveland 


860 


Kelley 


Baltimore 


Q52 


Fuller 


New York 


9?,H 


Canavan 


Cincinnati 


939 


Radford 


Washington 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 


907 


Delahanty 

Van Haltren 


.947 

871 


McAleer 


Cleveland . . . . 


937 


Dahlen 




89*^ 


Pfeffer. 


Louisville 


944 


Nash 




913 


Long 


Boston 


886 


Reitz 


Baltimore 


942 


Ward 




864 


Carroll 


Boston 


919 


McPhee 




96'?1 


Crooks 


St Louis 


909 


Parrott 


Chicago 


.914 



THE BEST BASE STEALERS OF EACH CLUB FOR 1893. 

The official record of stolen bases for 1893 shows that the 
nine players of each club who excelled in this respect were 
as given in the appended table. The names of the clubs 
are given in the order of total bases stolen by the nine best 
base runners of each club : 



66 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



NEW YORK. 



PLAYERS. 


134 
135 
133 


r 

72 
67 
54 


PLAYERS. 


i 


B 


PLAYERS. 


a 
o 


o 


Ward 


Dovle 


80 
124 
135 


49 
41 
41 


1 Fuller 

Stallord 

Lyons 


130 
67 
46 


?8 


Burke 

Davis 


Tiernan 

Connor 


24 
15 







Total stolen bases, 401. 



^ 


BALTIMORE. 








Brodie 


132 52 1 KeltZ 


130 
114 

88 


33 liShindle 

27 1 Robinson 

25 iiLong 


125 
91 
55 


?1 


McGraw 

Kelley 


127 40 !i Tread way 

124 38 iiTavlor 


16 
9 



Total stolen bases, 261. 



BROOKLYN. 



Foutz 


....i 130j 52 
....! 93 47 
....1 1261 43 


IShock 


93; 21 
107 1 21 
115! 18 


Hatdelu 

Dailey 

Richardson . . 


. 33 
. 58 
. 57 


15 


Griffin .... 
Daly 


iBurns 

1 Corcoran 


15 
11 



Total stolen bases, 247. 



PITTSBURGH. 



Dona van 


110 49 E. Smith ... 


..1 1281 28 


iShugart 


109 


22 


Glasscock 


114 39 Beckk'v. ... 


.. 131' 24 


'Stenzel 


51 


13 


Van Haltren. . . 


1231 35 1 Lyons 


..' 131 24 


iBierbauer 


128 


11 



Total stolen bases, 245. 



CLEVELAND. 



Kwing 

Burkett 

McAleer . . 


114 
124 
91 


53 
39 
33 


ChiUls 

O'Connor 

McGarr 


122 27 
93 23 
63 20 


Tebeau .... 
McKcau ... 
Virtue 


...i 115 
..1 125 


20 
15 
1? 













Total stolen bases, 242. 



Lange 


116 

93 
107 


49 
42 
33 


Parrott 

Camp 


113 30 

38 29 
81 19 


Dungau 

Anson 

Rvan 


107 

101 

82 


14 


Wilmot 


13 


Dahlen 


Decker 


8 



Total stolen bases, 237. 



CINCINNATI. 



Latham 

Canavan 

McPhee 


V2i, 
llh 
127 


60 1 Halllday .... 

32 Vaughn 

31 1 Comiskey ... 


..1 122: 25 
..| 119i 18 
..1 62 12 


iG smith 

McCarthy 

IMetz 


130 
48 
42 


12 
9 
5 



Total stolen bases, 204. 



ST. LOUIS. 



Dowd 


1311 59 1 
128 31 
121 1 28 1 


Quiun 


135 

94 

124 


25 1 

14 

12 


Cooley 

Frank 


26 
40 
23 


11 


Crooks 


Peitz 


9 


T. O'Rourke... 


Werden 


Baunon 


.7 



Total stolen basts, 196. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 
BOSTON. 



67 







w 






aj 






m 






^ 






m 




OS 




PLAYERS. 


B 

OS 




PLAYERS. 


m 

B 


a;eq 


PLAYERS. 









CC 







O! 







CO 


Duffy 


131 
116 


50 

49 


Long 


120 
120 


33 
31 


Tucker 

Stivetts 


121 
41 


1?, 


McCarthy 


Carroll 


6 


Nash 


123 


33 


Lowe . 


120 


21 


Merritt 


35 


3 









Total stolen bases. 174. 



PHILADELPHIA. 





82 
132 
117 


41 
36 
21 


Hallman 

Thompson 

Cross 


132 
130 
94 


21 

18 
15 


Rellly 


104 

123 

30 


q 


Delahanty .... 
Boyle 


Allen 

Sharrott 


7 
6 



Total stolen bases, 174. 



LOUISVILLE. 



T. Brown 

Pf effer 

Weaver 


121 
124 

104 


66 
33 
17 


Grimm 

Pinkney 

Browning 


92 
118 

57 


16 
14 
10 


IW. lirown 

Stratton 

iDenny 


118 
58 
44 


9 
5 
4 



Total stolen bases, 174. 



WASHINGTON. 



Hoy 


130 
121 
124 


51 
21 

19 


O'Rourke 

Farrell 


129 

132 

31 


19 
11 

8 


Maul 


39 

127 

81 


5 


Wise 


Sullivan 

Larkin 


5 


Radford 


Abbev 


3 









Total stolen bases, 142. 

THE MONTHLY CAMPAIGNS OF 1893. 

The League championship season of 1893 was opened on 
April 27th, on which date four of the six contests took 
place, respectively at Washington in the eastern division, 
and at Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis in the western ; 
the clubs of Boston and New York, and Brooklyn and Phila- 
delphia not entering the lists until April 2Sth, when they 
opened the season respectively at New York and Philadel- 
phia. The result of the opening day's games on April 27th 
was the success of the Washington team in the east and of 
the Cincinnati and St. Louis teams in the west, the Boston 
and Philadelphia clubs also being successful in their open- 
ing games, the record of the inaugural days' games of the 
season being as follows: 



T)ATE. 



April 27 
April 27 
Apr 11*27 
April 27 
April 28 
April 28 



Clubs. 



Washington vs Baltimore 
Cleveland vs. Pittsburgh. 
St. Louis vs. Louisville. . . 
Cincinnati vs. Chicago. . . 

Boston vs. New York 

Philadelphia vs. Brooklyn 



Played AT 



Wasliington 
Pittsburgh. 
St. Louis. 
Cincinnati, 
New York. 
Philadelp'a. 



Pitchers. 



Meekin McMahou 

Young Killen 

Hawley Stratton 

MuUane McGill 

Nichols King 

Weyhing Stein 



02 

7-5 
7-2 
4-2 
10-1 
9-2 
7-5 



68 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



The attendance at the four games on April 27th aggre- 
gated 30,000, while at the two games of April 2Sth over 
23,000 people were present, the opening at New Yorkbeinga 
great success. By the end of the first month of the season 
32 games had been played, with the appended result: 



APRIL RECORD. 



C'Ll- 



Clevelaud. ., 

St. Louis 

Waslriugton 
CincinuatL . 

CUicago 

Bostou 









w 








«_ « 








CE 


s 






*j'2 


UJ 


00 









1 






<* 


-J 




Cl, 


2 





2 


1.000 


2 


1 


3 


.667 


2 


1 


3 


.667 


2 


2 


4 


.500 





2 


4 


.500; 


1 


1 


2 


.oOOl 



Clubs. 



Philadelphia. 
Sew York, . 

Brooklyn 

Baltinrore .. . 

Louisville ... 

.0OO| Pittshur^h. ., 



m 






Si 
2 


s 
s 




3 


V 


a? 


> 


;5 


Om 




1 


2 




1 


2' 




1 


2' 







3 




2 


3! 





2 


2| 



.500 
.500 
.500 
.333 
.333 



It will be seen that the Cleveland club ended the opening 
month's brief campaign with ttie lead, while the Pittsburgh 
club had to be content with the tail end position, the former 
not losing a game in April, while the latter did not win one. 

The Way campaign, however, saw a surprising change 
made in the relative positions of the competing teams, the 
Pittsburgh club making quite a brilliant rally during the 
month, with the gratifying result of pushing themselves 
right among the six leaders, to begin with, and then ending 
the May campaign by taking the leading position, with the 
Brooklyn club a good second and the Clevelands third, the 
other three of the six clubs occupying the leading positions 
being the Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore clubs, the 
Louisville having to be content with the tail end position 
for the month of May, as the appended record shows: 

■ THE MAY RECORD. 



Clubs. 



Pittsburgh. 
Jirooklyn.. 
Clevelaud. 

Kostou 

Philadelphia 



Si 

of*" 



9126' 

9,22' 

16 12 2s 

14 11 25 



Clubs. 



!■§ 



Cincinnati ..12 14 26. 464 

St. Louis 11, 13:24!. 450 

New York 12 15 27! .442 

Wasliington U 14 25 .448 



.560 Chicago ... 



>> 14 22 .364 



Baltimore |13|13!26I .500 i iLouisville. I 2|13 15 . 130 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



69 



It will be seen that the Louisville club was very unfor- 
tunate during the May campaign, they winning but two 
games out of the fifteen they played; bad weather, too, pre- 
venting them from playing nearly a third of their scheduled 
games. On the other hand the Pittsburghs won no less than 
eighteen out of the twenty-five games they played. 

Singularly enough during the third monthly campaign of 
the season in June, the leading club of May fell back among 
the tail enders again, while the Bostons jumped to the front, 
with the Philadelphians a close second and the Brooklyns a 
good third. The New York club, too, rallied well and got 
into position among the six leaders, while Pittsburgh was 
obliged to end the June campaign as occupants of eleventh 
place. Here is the record of the June campaign: 



THE JUNE RECORD. 









































1-1 <v 










.0 










*^ ° 


Clubs. 


3i 


S 


■6 


?r 


Clubs. 


a; 


S 


-d 


^.2 










o;> 




?. 







o;> 








fT" 






z> 






























> 





Ah 


An 




>■ 


a 


Ph 


D. 


Boston . . 


17 


5 


22 


.773 
.760 


Cincinnati 


10 
10 


12 


22 

99 


455 


Philadelphia 


Baltimore 


.455 


Brooklyn 


Ifi 


8 


24 


667 


Chicago 


10 


14 


24 


417 


Cleveland 


15 
12 
11 


12 
12 
13 


27 
24 
24 


.556 
.500 

.458 


St. Louis 

Pittsburgh 


8 
8 


15 
18 
16 


23 
26 
23 


34R 


New York 


?^08 


Washington 


Louisville 


.304 



The July campaign saw several important changes in the 
relative positions of the twelve competing teams. In the 
first place the Pittsburghs made a second brilliant rally, and 
once more got to the front, they giving even the Bostons 
the go by ; while Cleveland worked up to third place, which 
position they had occupied in May. But New York and 
Brooklyn fell off badly, while St. Louis got up among the 
leaders for the ffirst time since April, Louisville pulling 
up to a tie with Cincinnati, while Brooklyn got so low in the 
race as to tie Washington for last place by the end of the 
month, as the appended record shows; these two clubs 
winning but seven games each, out of the twenty-seven each 
played ; while the Pittsburgh club made their highest record 
of the season in July by winning twenty games out of the 
twenty-six played. The Cleveland club topped the month's 
record with twenty -two victories, but they lost ten games. 
Here is the record of the July campaign, which was so dis- 
astrous to New York, Brooklyn and Baltimore : 



70 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



THE JULY RECORD. 











n,S 










^s 










o-E 










o-C 


Clubs. 


1 




73 


*1 o 


CLrB.-s. 


1 


4 


T^ 


n 




.9 


« 






R 


t 


a> 


o> 




« 


« 


^ 






o 


<u 


03 






> 


^ 


a. 


ft. 




> 


a 


&H 


a, 

... . 


Pittsburgh 


20 


6 


26 


.769 


Louisville 


14 


14 28 


.500 


Boston 


20 


9 


29 


.690 


Chicapro 


1.3 


15 2S 


.464 


Cleveland 


22 
16 


10 
12 


32 

28 


.677 
.571 


New York. . 


12 
10 


14;26 

18!28 


46? 


St. Louis 


Baltimore 


.357 


Philadelphia 


15 


12 


27 


.556 


Brooklyn 


7 


20127 


.259 


Cincinnati 


14 


14 


28 


.500 


Washinjrton 


7 


20I27 


.259 



Louisville, it will be seen, did remarkably well in July in 
winning as many games as they lost, something five other 
of the twelve clubs failed to do. 

The feature of the August compaign was the successful 
effort made by the Boston club to secure a winning lead. 
In July they had won twenty out of twenty-nine games, 
and in August they did even better, as they won twenty out 
of twenty-five games. Another success of the month, too, 
was the rally made by the New York team, which team won 
nineteen out of twenty- six games, the best monthly record 
they made; Pittsburgh this month had to be content with 
third place, while Baltimore got back among the leaders, 
leaving Brooklyn a tie with Louisville for sixth place, Wash- 
ington having assumed a mortgage on the last ditch which 
they occupied in July. 

Here is the record of the August campaign : 

AUGUST RECORD. 



Cixns. 



Boston 20 

New York 19 

Pittsburgh 10 

Baltimore 15 

Cincinnati 12 

Brooklvn !l.3 



CLfB.S. 



Louisville 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia. 

Chicago . 

St. Louis 

Washington. , 



13 13 
14116 

r2|i4 

lOls 
10 19 
6I2I 






..500 
.467 
.462 
.357 
.345 
26 .192 



The feature of the last monthly campaign of the season 
was the marked falling off in the work of the Boston team. 
The Bostons had virtually won the pennant early in the 
month, and when their position as the coming champions 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



71 



was a foregone conclusion, they dropped their previous 
strenuous efforts, and took things easy, and one result of 
this was that during September they lost nine games out of 
the twenty-two played. 

It was in this last campaign that considerable interest 
was taken in the struggle between the New York and 
Brooklyn clubs to beat each other out in the race ; the final 
result, however, was the success of the New Yorkers, though 
Brooklyn led in the way of percentage of victories for the 
month by .478 to .444. Chicago rallied well in September, 
and Cleveland did good work; but Philadelphia fell off 
badly owing to injuries to players mainly. Here is the 
record of the last monthly campaign of the season: 

SEPTEMBER RECORD. 



Pittsburgh 
Cleveland. , 

CMcago 

Cincinuati. 

Boston 

Brooklyn . . 









ai 








^.9, 
















. 
















fl ^ 







^ 


^> 





0) 


=« 




r- 


Q 


Ck 


ft. 


19 


4 


33 


.826 


17 


8 


25 


.680 


14 


8 


22 


.636 


15 


10 


25 


.600 


12 


9 


22 


.571 


11 


12 


23 


.478 



Clubs. 



Philadelphia. 
Baltimore . . . 
New York. . 

St. Louis 

Louisville 

Washington . 



■2 




-ri 


S 


a> 









^ 


fc> 


w 


Pt, 


11 


13 


24 


11 


13 


24 


12 


15 


27 


10 


15 


25 


10 


15 


25 


4 


21 


25 



O S-l 

of*" 



.458 
.458 
.444 
.406 
.406 
.160 



The full monthly record as a whole is appended, the 
names of the clubs being given in the order they stand in 
the race, and each in its own section : 

FULL MONTHLY RECORD FOR 1 893. 



Monthly Record. 

1893. 

Eastern Clubs. 



Boston 

Philadelphia 

New York 

Brooklyn 

Baltimore 

Washington 

Western Clubs. 

Pittsburgh 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

Louisville 



w l 



2 
2 
2 2 
2 2 
2 1 

1 2 



W L 

16 12 
14 11 

12 15 

17 9 

13 13 
11 14 



18 7 
13 9 
12 14 

8 14 
11 13 

2 13 



W L 

17 6 
19 6 
12 12 
16 8 

10 12 

11 13 



W L 



20 9 
15 12 
12 14 

7 20 

10 18 

7 20 



8 18 20 6 



15 12 

10 12 

10 14 

8 15 

7 16 



22 10 
14 14 

13 15 
16 12 

14 14 



W L 



20 5 
12 14 
19 7 
18 13 
15 1211 
5 21 4 



53 
WL 



16 11 19 

14 16 17 
12 11 15 
10 18 14 
10 19 10 

15 15 10 



9 86 43 
13 72 57 
15 68 64 

12 65 63 

13 60 70 
21 40 90 

4 81 48 

8 73 55 

10 65 63 

8:57 71 

15 57 75 

15 50 75 



72 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



THE LEAGUE OFFICIAL AVERAGES FOR 1893. 

The following tables are those made up by Secretary N. 
E. Young, and they present the best analysis of the season's 
play in the League championship arena which the incom- 
plete scoring rules of the League code admit of. It will be 
seen that the batting average record, given below, places Sten- 
te\ of the Ptttsburgh club as the leading batter of the season, 
simply because he has the highest base hit percentage, while 
Ewing of the Clevelands, who had a base hit average of 
.371 is seventh on the list, and yet Stenzel's work at the bat 
does not compare for a moment with that of Ewing in the bat- 
ting which forwards runners, the former making but 12 sac- 
rifice hits to Ewing's 35, and stealingbut 13 bases to Ewing's 
53. Here are the official averages in question : 

BATTING RECORD 

OK I'LAVERS WHO HAVE TAKEN PART IN FIFTEEN OR MORE 
CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. SEASON OF 1 893. 



Name. 



Steuzel 

Hainiltou , . 

Dnny 

Thoiiipson. 

Davis 

Burkett .... 

E\*^inj)r 

Bro\vuin<?.. 
Delehaiity . . 
E. Smith. . . . 

Baniiau 

Merritt 

McCarttiy... 

Tebeau 

Coolej 

A'au llaltrou 
Broutlier.s. . 
J. M. Ward . 
Glasscock . . 
Brodie 



Club. 



Pittsburgh .^1198 56 Slj 

Philadelphia 82 .349jlllil38i 

Boston T3l'.537 149|203| 

Philadelphia il30 5S3;i3o:220 

New York 133 533 112 1991 

Cleveland 124 480 144,179 

Cleveland 114 4771116 I77i 



H CO 



12 13 
15|41 
39 50 



Louisville I 57;2I4| 37 

Philadelphia 132 5>s8il45 

' Pittsburtrh I2.s 500 119 

St. Louis I 231 99 9 

Ho.ston I 35^135 29 

Boston !lli;;441 10: 

Cleveland 1 11.5 47,s 

St. Louis 28 103 

Pittsburgh 123 o02 



Brooklyn j 7.526' 

New York 134 5.57 

St. Louts, Pittsburgh 114 457 

St. Louis, Baltimore 1321549 

liobiiisou 'Baltimore j 01 349 

Keeler iNcw York, Brooklyn I 26; 90 

HoliiiUy Cincinnati 1122 475 

Childs iCleveland '122 481 

Frank .a iSt. Louis I 40163 

Donovan I I'ittsburgh 110|465 

Twitchell 1 Louisville I 4.5181 

McGraw iBaltimore 1271475 

Hallman I Philadelphia 132 



Tiernan. 
McKean 

MiU'k. .. 
Becklev. 



20! 37 

129 176 

53 93 

12*194 

81159 

89 188 

49118 

19 30 

10r>|l58 

1431160 



New York 124;471 

Cleveland 125 510 

Pittsburgh i 3til20i 22 

Pittsburgh Il3i 497 Ioh 

Turner iPhiladelphla i 35 1541 32 



54! 
154, 

f'Ul 

lofij 
186 
154| 
166! 

39 
161 

50 



.409 113 
.395183; 
.3781258 : 
.377|316;38il8 
.373:313:31 '54 
.372l248j44,39 
.37li253, 35(53 
.3711 9810ilO 
.370,346140 36 
.366|277i23!2S 
.363 47 1 7 
.363| C9; 7 3 
.360 2I8,31|49 
.3591230 28120 
.3591 47 i 211 
.a50'220 31 35 
.34>n;I44 26I 8 
348'249 4<t;72 
.347,204 43, ;« 
.342 235 28 '52 
.338 1.56 23:16 
.333 43 iZl 7 
.:j32i22() 2S 25 
.33^1209 17 27 
.33l| 691 aj 9 
.3311183 46,49 
.3;i| 84 111 5 
.32>|201 25 40 
.328 247.44121 
.327 239 44141 
.325 2516315 
.325 44| 9 4 
.324|24«,64 24 
.3241 63 5i 7 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 
BATTING RECORD. — Continued. 



73 



Name. 


Club. 


i 
i 


cS 

< 


s 


% 


"3 
% 

u 


P3 






Irwin 


Chicago 


21 

80 

135 

101 

81 

93 

131 

26 

121 

120 

121 

33 

16 

124 

115 

107 

63 

56 

93 

41 

104 

127 

126 

118 

129 

117 

93 

82 

128 

94 

67 

121 

119 

128 

130 

40 

122 

125 


77 
307 
490 
381 
313 
374 
462 

82 
507 
465 
460 
114 

54 
490 
463 
444 
246 
220 
365 
165 
413 
468 
450 
462 
527 
482 
.348 
332 
466 
414 
272 
467 
464 
506 
474 
141 
492 
503 


14 

55 

111 
70 
54 
69 

103 
21 

101 

120 

102 

26 

8 

120 

113 
85 
38 
27 
71 
31 
79 

102 
97 
85 
76 

106 
84 
82 

117 
85 
58 
81 
68 
81 
90 
15 
83 

102 
10 
49 
12 

114 
50 

149 
11 
33 
60 

121 
92 
86 
67 
78 
34 


25 
100 
158 
123 
101 
119 
147 

26 
160 
147 
145 

36 


.324 
.322 
.322 
.322 
.322 
.318 
.318 
.317 
.317 
.316 
.315 
315 


35 
130 

234 

150 

139 

170 

205 

44 

233 

212 

169 

46 

18 

236 

216 

182 

87 

99 

144 

79 

164 

194 

209 

187 

199 

201 

164 

145 

213 

163 

117 

179 

179 

204 

187 

f4 

199 

185 

23 

89 

40 

197 

118 

211 

22 

73 

178 

219 

179 

146 

154 

155 


8 
14 

28 
32 
16 
39 
31 
11 
24 
37 
39 
9 

32 
3S 

15 
33 

4 
31 
38 
24 
35 
32 
36 
14 
10 
41 
19 
16 
40 
25 
35 
26 

9 
35 
28 

2 
17 

4 
21 
24 
20 

2 

9 
29 
29 
26 
38 
34 

9fi 


4 


Doyle 


New York 


49 






?9 


Anson 


Chicago . .... 


13 


Larkin 


Washington 

Chicago 


8 


Wilmot 


4? 


D. Lyons 


Pittsburgh 


94 


Earie 


Pittsburgh 


1 


Wise. 


Washington 


n 




Boston 


?,i 


T. O'Rourke 

G. Hatfield 


Baltimore, Louisville 

Brooklyn , 


28 
15 


M. Kelly . ... 


New York 


17 

153 

144 

138 

76 

68 

113 

51 

128 

144 

138 

142 

161 

147 

106 

101 

142 

125 

82 

140 

139 

151 

141 

42 

146 

149 

21 

64 

26 

164 

103 

159 

19 

44 

104 

150 

132 

104 

111 

123 

59 


.314 

.312 
.311 
.310 
.309 
.309 
.309 
.309 
.309 
.307 
.306 
.305 
.305 
.305 
.304 
.304 
.304 
.302 
.301 
.299 
.299 
.298 
.297 
.297 
.296 
.296 
.295 
295 
.295 
.294 
.294 
.294 
.292 
.291 
.290 
.289 
.238 
.287 
.287 
.286 
.286 


fi 


Kelly 


Baltimore 


3? 


Dahlen . 


Chicago 


3? 


Dungan 


Chicago 


14 


McGarr u.. 

Ziranier 


Cleveland 

Cleveland 


2C 




Cleveland 


% 


Stivetts 


Boston 


1 




Louisville 

Cincinnati 


r 


McPliee 


31 


T. Daly 


Brooklyn 


4,' 


W. Brown 


Louisville 


c 


J. O'Rourke 


Washington 


It 


Boyle 


Philadelphia 

Brooklyn. . 


'^1 


Griffin. 


-I'' 


Rvan 




F 


Nasli 


Boston 


3' 


Cross 


Philadelphia 


If 


Stafford. . 


New York 


0^ 


Tucker 




Y 


Vaughn 


Cincinnati . . . 


1? 


Bierbauer 


Pittsburgh 


n 


Reitz ... 




% 


Esper 


Washington 


1 


Farrell 


Washington 


11 


Latham 


Cincinnati 


fif 


German 


New York 

Chicago 


20 1 71 
59217 
24 88 

131557 
88350 

128 540 
21 65 
44 1 151 
90 358 

135518 

116468 
95 362 
92 386 

109 430 
58 206 


r 


Schriver 


r 


Hawley 


St. Louis , 

St. Lo.iV^ Jrr. 

BaltihYbie 


f 


Dowd ^^ 

Taylor 

Long 


5c 


Boston 


% 


MGiiefee 


Loui'^ville 




Kllien 


Pittsburgh 


f 


Clements , 


fPhiladelphia. 


1 


Hurke 


iNew York 


6'' 


Lano"e. 


Chicago ... 


4c 


Virtue . . . 

Grimm .. 


Cleveland 

Louisvil'e 


li 
If 


Shugart 


Pittsburgh, St. Louis 

Brooklyn 


'}f 


Dailey 


74' 13 


V 



74 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



BATTING RECORD. — Cofltl'nued. 



N.VMF. 



Gunson . . 
McCaitliy 
Werdeu '. 
Allen .... 

Terry 

Ganzel . . . 
Corcoran 
Stale v.... 
Wilson.... 
T. Burns., 

Abbey 

Decker.. . 



Cl.lB. 



Slioch Brooklyn 



St. Louis, Cleveland. 

CiucinnaU 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

;5oston 

Brooklyn 

Boston 

-N'ewYork 

Brooklyn 

Washington 

Chicago. 



Kennedy. , 

(Ulks 

Hen V 

Ward 

Sn viler.... 

Lyons 

Foutz 

Sullivan... 

Rusie 

McGill .... 
Pfetrer . . . . 

Camp 

Treadwav. 
Motz. ...'. 

Peitz 

Gleason.. . 

Maul 

Ely 

Mciinirc . , 
McMah )u . 
Hut( hison, 
Kins'ow.. . 

Hov 

Shindle ... 

Cuppv 

Sharrott .. 
Meakin 



Brooklyn ,* 

Baltimore 

Cincinnati 

Baltimore, Cincinnati. 

Pittsburgh 

New York 

Brooklyn 

Washington 

New York 

Chicago 

Louisville 

Chicago 

Baltimore 

Cincinnati 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Washington 

St. Louis 

Washington 

Baltimore 

Chicago 

Brooklyn 

Washington 

Baltimore 

Cleveland 

{Philadelphia .. . . .T. .. 
Washington 



r)S2I^ 
4S 186 

VH 485 

l-2;3 4o9 
18 1 60 
63 ,202 

115,437 
32 107 
29 107 

107 



McAlocr 1 Cleveland. 

Stovey 

T. Brown 

Reiliy 

Parrot t 

Stratton 

Denny 

Young 

Crooks 

Haddock 

Gumbert 

Mullane 

Fuller 



Baltimore, lirooklyn.. . 

I^uisville 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Cleveland 

St. Louis 

Brooklyn 

Pittsbtirgh 

Cincinnati, Baltimore. 
New York 



31 
81 
93 
42 
15 
21 
49 
25 
46 
130 

127 490 
55 211 
35 115 

124147.5 
3S,149 
114:443 
421146 
94 346 
55184 
39 1 125 
44|171 
59 '225 
381141 
41 1.57 
77,297 
130 532 
125 520 
2S 105 
30 118 
29 110 
91 .?44 
53 193 
121 520 
104 3'.t7 
113 44S 
5S 194 
44 163 
4s 179 

128 4'.'fi 
'.6l 84 
24] SO 
43 156 

130 457 



32 61 
27 53 
73138 
88 130 
17 



13, 30 
16 30 
67 111 



31 

89 
87 
41 
17 
23 
53 
23 
48 
144 
73! 133 
33 1 57 
161 31 
8V12S 
37 40 
78 119 



13 37 

14 41 
38 77 

105 138 
100 1.35 

15 1 27 



49 



.282 91 
.281|163 
.2801 41 
.280 42 
.279 166 
.2771 41 
.276120 
.276 110 
51 



.272 210 
.271 181 
.2701 77 
.269J 33 
.269 192 
.268 1 63 
.20« 168 
.267 1 5ti 
.266 120 



104 131' 
<iU lOO' 
5.-. 113 
33 1 49 

21 41' 

22 45' 
93 107 
2l| 21 
181 20: 

23 39 
78 I 113! 



.266 

.264 

.263 

.262 

.262 

.261 1 56 

.259108 

.259 165 

.259 181 
36 

.254 

.254 

.253 

.253 

.2.53 
2.52 144 
252 144 



252 


65 


19 


251 


69 


11 


251 


50 


11 


251 


138 


26 


250 


32 


2 


250 


29 


8 


250 


46 


12 


247 


142 


22 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 
BATTING RECORD. — Continued. 



75 



Name. 


Club, 


i 

a 

O 


< 


' xn 

n 

_^ 

37 
33 
64 
11 
21 
66 
35 
25 
62 
10 
82 
17 
29 

9 
10 
88 
62 
18 
30 
38 
33 
10 

5 

9 
13 
11 
23 
24 
15 
12 

7 
18 
12 
13 
28 

9 
18 

2 
13 

6 
12 

8 


i 
I 

% 

48 
60 

118 
27 
53 

126 
59 
39 

104 
18 
98 
34 
47 
20 
19 

104 

105 
28 
50 
58 
40 
13 
13 
18 
9 
26 
32 
2S 
24 
25 
14 
22 
17 
15 
38 
17 
26 


^ 1 

1 

u 
<S 

.246 
.245 
.244 
.243 
.242 
.241 
.241 
.239 
.238 
.237 
.234 
.234 
.234 
.229 
.229 
.228 
.226 
.226 
.225 
.225 
.218 
.209 
.206 
.204 
.200 
.197 
.194 
.194 
.193 
.192 
.191 
.191 
.188 
.185 
.181 
.180 
177 


W 

^_ 

57 
85 

159 
38 
70 

154 
92 
52 

145 
22 

123 
42 
58 
28 
23 

130 

131 
41 
67 
73 
57 
17 
19 
21 
11 
28 
40 
36 
30 
31 
21 
30 
22 
18 
46 
24 
31 
9 
24 
14 
^6 


S' 








51 195 


9'll 






G7 245 
130 487 
34 111 


11 

24 

8 

8 

34 

15 

11 

40 

5 

41 

13 

6 

11 

5 

19 

35 

16 

9 

8 

11 

4 

3 

2 

2 
10 
16 
12 

\ 
3 

i 

10 
6 

4 

1? 
\ 


4 


Sinitli 


Cincinnati 


!*> 


Stein 


Brooklyn 

Washington 

St. Louis 

Baltimore, New York 

Boston 

Cincinnati 

Philadelphia 


4 


Mulvey 


65 219 

135 522 

63 244 

47|167 

118436 

.19 76 

120 419 

43 145 

561201 

19 1 87 

231 82 

124 454 

1181420 

341124 

55 222 

62 1 2.53 


'}, 




95 


Milligan 


11 


Nichols 


4 


Cauavau 


?n. 


Keefe 


1 




Boston r. 


SI 


Hemniiu"" . 


Louisville 

Cincinnati 


3 




?, 


Taylor 


Philadelphia 


1 


Whistler 


Louisville, St. Louis 

Washington 

Louisville 


^ 


Radford 


37 


Pinkney 


14 




1 


Loug 


Baltimore 


03 






n 


Bennett 


Boston 


58 
17 
18 
23 
16 


183 

62 
63 
88 
45 


5 


McNahb 


Baltimore 


3 


Parrott 


Cincinnati 





Griffin 


St Louis 


?l 


King . 


New York, Cincinnati 

Philadelphia 


"^ 


Carsey 

Clark 


36'l32 
47,165 
40 144 
36!124 
38 135 
22 73 
32 115 
27 90 
25 81 
59 210 
27 1 94 
40 147 
181 55 
41133 
17i 67 
36 124 







'}, 


Miller . .... 


Pittsburgh 


4 


Eliret 


Pittsburgh 


'f. 


Jennings 


Louisville, Baltimore .... 








Dwyer 


Cincinnati 




Hawke 

Gastright 

Strieker 


Baltimore 

Pittsburgh, Boston 




Chamberlain t. 


Ctucinuati 




Brietenstein 


St. Louis 


">, 


Mauck 


<'hicago 


9i.l63 

211.158 
10 .149 
18 '.145 





Weyhino" 


Philadelphia . 





Rhodes 







Baldwin 


\'ew ^ Ork 


6 


Clarkson 


St. Louis...., 


21 


' 72 


10 


.139 


11 


1 3 






It will be seen that the first nine men who lead in base 
hit averages, and who have i layed in loo games and over, 
are Duffy, Thompson, Davis, Burkett, Ewing, Delehanty, 
E. Smith, McCarthy and Tebeau. Those who lead in less 
than loo games, are Stenzel, Hamilton and Browning, 
making the first eleven in batting. 



76 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

FIELDING AVERAGES, 1893. 

FIRST BASEMEN. 





Nam::. 


Cl-IB. 


a 

31 

o 


O 

3 


56'16 

36 j 8 
96 '22 
42 14 
42 2U 

er, 21 

10; 5 

15 12 
35, 9 
17| 4 
2114 

37 2" 
45 17 
44 22 
8140 
12 6 
80 40 
19 11 
27 30 


d 

H 

1220 
610 

1478 
785 

lOfO 

1145 
270 
604 
466 
207 
706 


1 


1 


W. Browu 


Louisville 


117 


^^lk 


.987 
986 




Tebtaii 


561 ritiri 


3 
4 


Heckley 


Pittsburgh 

Biooklyu 

Chicago 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Brooklyn 

Cincinnati 

Baltimore 

Cincinnati 


131 
7o 

100 

111 
27 
54 
42 
22 
62 

121 
73 
88 

1.35 
21 

124 
33 
81 


1360 

729 
998 
1058 
2n5 
577 
422 

671 
1256 
773 
882 
1419 
217 
1190 
277 
774 


985 


Broutbers 

( AIHOU 


.982 
981 


5 


Ir.ovle 

(Dt-"cker 

f Foulz 


:98i 

.981 


6 


jMotz 

j Millegau.. 


.980 
980 




1 comisky 

J Tucker 

j A'irtue 


QSO 




Boston 


1320 .979 




Cleveland 


835' 979 


s 


Tavlor 


lialtimore 


948 976 


9 


J Connor 


New York. 


1540 974 


I Vaughn 

Werden 


Cincinnati 


235 .974 


10 


St. Louis 


i:jlO <4fi<» 


11 


|0'Roiirke 

(Larkin 


Washington 

Washington 


307 
831 


.964 
.964 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



1 Bierbauer . 

2 McPhee 

3 Hallnian . . . 
,1 (Preffer... 

i iQuiun 

5 Reitz 

6 Richardson 

7 i I, owe 

s Wise 

9Chiid.4 

10 Ward 

11 Dalv 

12 Striker .... 

13 i^uue 

14 Decker .... 



Pittsburgh 



Cincinnati 
IPliiladelphia. 
1 Louisville..., 

St. Louis 

Baltimore. . . 

Brooklyn 

Boston , 

Washington. 
Cleveland . .. 

New York 

Brooklyn . . . 
Wa.shingtou . 

iCIiicago 

iChicago 



128 


348 


127 


387 


120 


285 


124 


367 


135 


352 


130 


320 


44 


118 


116 


2yo 


90 


316 


122 


342 


134 


340 


82 


210 


39 


131 


66 


151 


20 


32 



438 33; 
445 42 
35y 36 

401 4a 
361 42' 
419 451 
111 15' 
3.S8 47 1 
302 48 1 
425 C0| 
469 65' 
268 44 1 
131 25 1 
177 41; 
56,181 



8191.96^ 
874 1. 952 
60 '.947 
813 .944 
755 .944 
784 .942 
244;. 939 
7-25 .936 
6661.928 
8271.927 
8741.926 
5221.915 
2S7[.912 
3691.889 
106 .830 



THIRD BASEMEN. 



l|<Jross 

21McGiirr.. 
3;l'inkuey.. 
4;»hock '. .. 

Parrot!.. . 

Nash 

I Lvons. . 
j Cn )oks . 

I^than .. 

Reilly . . . . 



.[Philadelphia. 
.Cleveland ... 
, 'Louisville . . 
, I Brooklyn ... 

. K'hicago 

.'Boston 

.'Pittsiiurgh .. 
, St. Louis — 
.Cincinnati.. . 
. Philadelphia. 



29 


42 


63 


99, 


118 


133 i 


36 


-15! 


101 


143 


12s 


188 


131 


206 


123 


214 


125 


1S9 


104 


162 



97 8 
139 14 
2SS|3S 



147 .946 
2.52 .944 
459;. 928 
123 .927 
25137 431 .914 
309 47 j 544 .913 
307 51 1 564 .909 
2S5 50 549 .909 
258 48 495 .903 
23042! 434. 900 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 
THIRD BASEMEN. —Continued. 



77 



Name. 



10 Davis , . , 
ll'Mulvey. . 

12 Shindle . 

13 j Hatfield. 

1,1 n 



Tebeau. 
Farrell . 
Daly . . . 
(Jamp... 
Wise... 



Clib. 



New York. . . 
Washington 
Baltimore... 

Brooklyn 

Cleveland... . 
Washington 

Brooklyn 

Chicago . . . . 
Washington 























3 


.£ 3) 






o 






d 


rA 


3 






o 


Oh 


<; 


W 


H 


133 


lyi 


307 


58 


556 


55 


93 


125 


28 


246 


125 


176 


313 


64 


553 


33 


45 


69 


15 


129 


56 


89 


134 


31 


254 


36 


67 


75 


20 


162 


44 


85 


85 


31 


201 


16 


23 


27 


30 


60 


31 


32 


76 


24J1.32I 



.878 
.87ft 
.845 



SHORT STOPS. 



1 


Smith 


Cincinnati 


130 

114 

130 

123 

41 

44 

21 

125 

115 

38 

117 

88 

124 

61 

76 

127 


245 
245 

264 

308 

82 

99 

55 

245 

218 

84 

221 

229 

275 

115 

139 

241 


510 
429 

468 
443 
148 
141 
66 
437 
437 
120 
346 
301 
469, 
179 
257 
389 


52 

47 
61 
63 

]l 

70 
23 
66 
64 

,95 
44 
60 

106 


807 
721 
793 

814 
252 
264 
133 
753 
725 
227 
633 
594 
S39 
338 
456 
736 


f^i\^ 


^ 


Glasscock 


Pittsburgh, St. Louis 

New York 


934 


,s 


Fuller 

Allen 

Denny 


1?3 


4 


Philadelphia 


922 


5 


Louisville 


9n 




1 Ely 


St. Louis 


909 


b 


\ Irwin 


Chicago 


909 


7 


McKean 


Cleveland 


905 


s 


Corcoran 


Brooklyn.. 


903 


q 


Jennings 


Louisville, Baltimore 

Baltimore .... .... 


898 


10 


McGraw 


896 


11 


Dahleu 


Chicago 


89? 


1'> 


Long. . 

O'Rourke 


Boston .... 


886 


13 


Baltimore, Louisville 

Pittsburgh, St. Louis 

Washington 


869 


14 


Shugart 


868 


15 


Sullivan 


856 









OUT-FIELDERS. 



1 


Henry 


Cincinnati 


21 
28 
93 
131 
132 
124 
49 
121 
114 
121 
82 
15 
114 
31 
91 
131 
16 
39 
46 
87 
35 


50 

51 
220 
313 
325 
301 

70 
266 
312 
337 
229 

26 
235 

66 
2-i2 
224 

27 

94 
105 
178 

78 


6 
4 
24 
13 
25 
21 
5 
12 
32 
40 

I 

15 

8 
16 
26 

2 

7 
8 


2 

2 
10 
14 
16 
16 

4 
15 
19 
24 
15 

2 
16 

5 
16 
17 

2 

7 

8 
14 

6 


58 

57 
254 
340 
366 
33S 

79 
293 
363 
401 
252 

33 
266 

79 
254 
267 

31 
108 
121 
20S 

89 


965 


V 


Doyle 


New York 

Brooklyn 


964 




j Gritfln 


960 


6 


") Dutfv 


Boston , 


958 


4 


Brodie 


St. Louis, Baltimore 

Baltimore 


956 


5 


Kelly 


952 


a 


O'Rourke 


Baltimore, Louisville 

Cincinnati 

Philadelphia 

Louisville . 


949 


7 


Holliday .'. 


.948 


8 


Delehanty 

{ T Brown 


.947 
940 


9 


j Hamilton 


Philadelphia 


940 




j Gilks 


Baltimore 


939 


10 


1 Canavan.. 


Cincinnati . . . 


939 


11 


Abbey 


Wa.'^hingtou .... 


938 


^9. 


McAleer 


Cleveland 


937 


13 


Dowd 

j Dahlen 


St. Louis 


936 


14 


Chicago 


93.'> 


1 Lano-e 


Cliicao'o 


9.35 


15 


Lyons 


New York 


934 


16 


• J O'Rourke 

(Turner 


Washington 


932 


Philadelphia 


.932 



78 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



OUT-FIELDERS. — Continued. 



Name. 



^ 



17 UoDovan 

18 Frank 

19 Burns 

20 Burke 

f Tienmn.. . 

n, I 1 Smith 

''^1 1 Thompson. 
I [Griffin. ... 

22;Shugart 

23 Ewing 

iStenzel . . . 
0"Coimi>r.. 
Weaver. . . . 
McCartliy . 
Carroll . . . 
Dungan . ... 
Tread way. .. 
j Ryan..\... 
■/ Radford. . 
McCarthv... . 
29 Shock ...'.. . . 

o^l ( Long 

"^^ (GanzeL.. . 

on ! t Hoy 

i '/ Stovev .... 
32' Foutz. .*.... 

33 Stailord 

341 Browning . . 
3.5 Decker 

36 Twitcliell ... 

37 Van Ilaltrcn. 
3SlWilmor 



Club. 



oa! j Vaughn. 
^•'I ( Stratton. 



Ward .... 
Burkctt... 
Bannon.. 
Sharrotrs. 



Pittsburgh 

St. Louis 

Brooklyn 

N'ew York r/r . . . 

Sew York 

Pittsburgh 

Philadelphia 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Cleveland 

Pittsburgh 

Cleveland 

iLouisville 

Cincinnati 

Boston 

Chicago .- 

Baltimore 

Chicago 

Washington 

Boston 

Brooklyn 

Baltimore , 

Boston 

Washington 

Baltimore, Brooklyn. . 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Louisville 

Chicago r. 

Louisville 

Pittsl)uryh I 

Chicago I 

Cincinnati 

Louisville | 

Baltimore, Cincinnati., 

Cleveland 

St. Louis 

Philadelphia 



llOjlOT 

40 77 

41 72 
83 1 141 
461 85 

ll20;226 
1071175 
114102 
72lr.9 
12;i l'J6 
107;:;24 

42 74 
55111 
21 41 

130 '282 
63 129 
76 L51 
67 120 
57114 
34 55 
45 92 

110 222 
93,198 
23 53 

20 27 
41| 7S 

124,240 

21 j 27 
23 1 36 



14 14 

Si 7 

19 14 
14 24 

11 16 

14 24 

17 15 
2, 4 
6 5 

10 18 
|3j 7 
' 8l 7 

18 14 
I 6| 8 

15 21 
18 18 

29 22 

20 IS 

30 23 
53 29 

4| 9 

8 14 
2l 5 

26 37 
i 4 16 

13 20 
10 17 

14 15 

12 9 
I 8 14 
20 36 

9 32 
51 9 
5' 5 

1114 
18 42 
2: 6 
210I 



CATCHERS' AVERAGES. 



Name. 



Club. 



Cross 

Bennett.. 
Clements. 

Ganzel 

Kittredge 



C Crimm. 



jPhiladelphia 40 

Boston 58J197 

Philadelphia 90,323 

: Boston 37:117 

Chicago 67l257 

I Louisville 88,278 



54 10 
42 12 
81,25 
41 9 
79 '24 
113 17 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 

catchers' averages. — Continued. 



79 





Name. 


Club. 


a 

6 

26 
75 
50 
72 
91 
36 
41 
33 
46 
25 
21 
58 
55 
29 
83 
56 
40 
75 

f9 


o 

100 
262 
217 
295 
348 
129 
197 
129 
191 
78 
59 
192 
165 
101 
310 
209 
141 
268 
179 
175 
165 
132 
54 


< 

20 
80 
42 
85 
73 
48 
64 
26 
64 
27 
21 
56 
43 
21 
152 
60 
48 
92 
61 
66 
46 
40 
23 


t 
I 

6 
12 

'I 

Tl 
13 
17 
10 
14 
5 
3 
21 
15 
7 
48 
21 
17 
33 
15 
16 
29 
21 
13 


flu 

7 
26 

6 
28 
27 
10 
17 
13 
20 

9 

8 

13 
14 
11 
21 
21 
13 
25 
24 
27 
12 
16 
19 


133 
380 
291 
427 
475 
200 
295 
178 
289 
119 
91 
282 
237 
140 
531 
311 
219 
418 
279 
284 
252 
209 
109 


a 


7 


Earl 


Pittsburgh 


.902 


8 


Vaughn 

Dailey 




.900 


g 


Brooklyn 


.890 


10 


Peitz 


St. Louis 


88Q 


11 






.886 


12 


Mack 


Pittsburgh 


885 


13 
14 


Mllligan. rr.... 

Merritt 


Baltimore, New York. . . . .v. 
Boston . . 


.884 
883 




( Doyle 


New York 

Pittsburgh 


.882 


15 


1 Snyder 


.882 




1 Weaver 




.879 


16 


1 Gunson 


St. Louis, Clevehwid 

Cincinnati 


87<> 


17 


Murphy., . . 


.877 


18 


Wilson 


New York 


871 


19 


Farrell 




.>s70 


20 


Schriver 


Chicago 


Rfi5 


71 


Miller 


Pittsburgh 


.863 


22 


Kinslow 


Brooklyn 


.861 


23 


O'Connor 

Zimmer 


Cleveland . . . 


860 


24 


Cleveland 


55 
47 
36 
16 


.848 


25 


McQuire 


Washington 


.837 


26 


Clarke 


Baltimore 


.823 


^27 


Kelly 


New York 


.706 



PITCHERS RECORD, IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER. 



Name. 



Breitenstein. . 

Baldwin 

Cuppy 

Clarkson 

Carsey 

Chamberlain. 



Club. 



St. Louis 

New York... 
Cleveland.. . 
Cleveland.. ., 
Philadelphia. 
Cincinnati . . 



Clarkson St. Louis 

Dwyer 

Esper 

Ehret 

German 

Gleason 

Gumbert. ... 
Gastright. . . . 

Hawley 

Hutchison. . . 



Cincinnati 

Washington 

Pittsburgh 

New York 

St. Louis 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Boston. 

St. Louis 

Chicago 





a; 








§ 








H 


O) 


(O 










% 


^% 


^■^ 






to 




S* 


(U bo 


It 


^'^ 


> 
'to 


o 






o 

r 


03 


P5 






CO 


9 
13 


?9 


.512 

.444 


4.39 

5.87 


2.00 
2.47 


.2.54 
.261 


134 
124 


104 

85 


36 


28 


.643 


7.07 


3.39 


.307 


66 


38 


1 


34 


.470 


7.11 


3.08 


.300 


100 


61 


15 


35 


,600 


6.58 


3.33 


.303 


121 


44 


12 


26 


.577 


5.81 


2.59 


.251 


104 


54 


10 


20 


.600 


5.33 


2.33 


.269 


66 


37 


11 


30 


..566 


6.35 


3.35 


.303 


90 


47 


4 


40 


,.300 


7.. 57 


2.95 


..322 


146 


74 


9 


36 


.444 


5.83 


2.60 


.283 


111 


67 


11 


17 


,.588 


6.16 


1.72 


.274 


64 


34 


4 


44 


.477 


6.35 


3.26 


.294 


165 


81 


12 


18 


.666 


5.84 


3.15 


.311 


66 


44 


2 


23 


.6,52 


7.52 


4.00 


.312 


108 


38 


10 


25 


.240 


7.48 


2.92 


.279 


99 


67 


9 


40 


.400 


6.66 


2.79 


.300 


141 


66 


10 









.884 
.797 



.814 
.769 
.675 
.944 
.861 
.807 
.833 
.8.38 
.947 
.797 
.714 



So 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



pitchers' RECORn. — Contzmied. 



Haddock.. 
Ileminiag. 

Hawke 

Killen . . . . 
Kenut.'dy.. 

Keefe 

King. 



Brooklyn 

Louisville 

Baltimore 

Pirtsburgli 

Brooklyn 

Pliiladelphia 

. N. Y., vinciunali. , 



Menefee Lor.isville, 

Maul Wasliington 

Meakin Washington 

Mnllaiie Ciucin'i, Baltimore. 

Mauck Chicago 

McGill Chicago 

McMahon Baltimore 

McNabb Baltimore 

Nichols Boston 

Parrot r ' 'hie., Cincinnati. 

Rusio New York 

Rhoados Louisville 

StraTtou Louisville 

Stivetts Boston 

etaley Boston 

Stein Brooklyn 

Sullivan Cincinnati 

Terry Piitsimrgh; 

Taylor I'hiladelphia 

Weyhing I'hiladelphia 

Young Cleveland 



1> 


,.444 7.i«4 


S.bl 


.296 


75 


33 


''^i 


3J 


1.487 6. '.t7 


3.44 


.306 


155 


81 


A 


27 


.444 6.23 


2.57 


,270 


97 


70 


15 


44 


.772 4.86 


2.13 


.261 


124 


87 


8 


\:\ 


.(i045.38 


2.33 


.257 


157 


91 


9 


ly 


.526 6.16 


2.37 


.291 


63 


47 


4 


17 


.470 7.00 


3.69 


.301 


f^4 


55 


8 


1.3 


.533 6.40 


2.40 


.291 


41 


30 


4 


33 


.303|7.64 


3.38 


.306 


138 


66 


7 


28 


.3576.57 


3.18 


.308 


136 


81 


15 


41 


.4636.62 


2.88 


.294 


168 


85 


14 


17 


.4126.27 


2.55 


.294 


51 


24 


10 


35 


.51416.28 


2.11 


.271 167 


80 


8 


3S 


.605 5.86 


2.48 


.'26?> 


1-13 


64 


12 


17 


.470'6.70 


2.94 


.300 


48 


17 


2 


46 


.717'4.76 


2.15 


.265 


110 


92 


5 


2U 


.500 6.57 


3.14 


.315 


71 


39 


5 


53 


.622 4.94 


1.87 


.2.58 


196 


20S 


25 


16 


.312 9.66 


5.11 


.363 


58 


21 


2 


38 


.342 7.13 


4.00 


.349 


99 


40 


8 


30 


.633,6.46 


3.20 


277 


113 


57 


4 


31 


.6457.22 


3.42 


.313 


69 


58 


11 


33 


.576 5.73 


2.61 


.256 


88 


83 


6 


22 


.363 6.77 


3 00 


.288 


79 


36 


5 


19 


.684 6.30 


2.55 


.273 


88 


49 


9. 


17 


.470 6.35 


3.00 


.270 


67 


30 


2 


40 


.600 5.85 


3.00 


.297 


139 


loo 


"I 


4^ 


.666 5.29 


2.43 


.276 


100 


100 


16! 



.812 
.875 
.736 
.815 
.878 
.812 
.770 
.839 
.826 
.752 
.850 
.648 
.777 
.741 
.854 
.917 
.847 



.910 
.894 
.747 
.860 
.758 
.800 
.882 



Batting and Fielding Record of Cli^s Members of thb National 
League and Amekican Asso. of Professional B.\se Ball Clibs.— 1S93. 





.-• 
















Clcb. 




c 










& 


Is 


















Q 










S3 








a 


Boston 


131 


86 





B.vtting. 








1 












-,, 


°u: 


ni 


2 


t 


"3 


2 ^ 


il 


1 




% 










1 


a 


< 


w-^ 


2 
o 


^ 


H 


2. 


H 


Cfi 


CC 



Fielding. 



2|I'itrsburgh . 131 8i 
SiCleveland. .129 73 
4 Pliiladelp-ia i:i3 72 
New York. . 136 68 
J Cincinn'ii 131 65 
1 Brooklyn, 130 65 
Baltimore. .'l30 60 
Chicago . . . 129 56 

St. Louis..., 135 57 

Louisville.. [126 .'.o 
Washingt'n 130 40 



4438 7.62 
44S8 7.29! 
4573 7.47 
4948 7 . 51 
461^ 6.86 
4311 5.57; 
4347 6.01 ; 
4510 6.27 
4361 6.39' 
4662 5.49 
44.52 6. 19 j 
4."i6R 5.561 



5 ! 






.304 1825 311 
.320 1979 367 
.31 S 19.54 302 
.313 2191 3fl 
.308 1998 272 
.269 looO 235 
.2^1 1724 2S5 
.283 1690 300 
.296 1758 323 
.275 1658 220 
.271 1631 335 
.275 1668 240 



2.53J 
227' 
261 
184' 
426 
243 
.300 
270 
265 
25S 
218 
168, 



3474 1678 359 
3472 1777 343 
3208 1693 339 
3535 17.V.t .•j27 
3631 1.S22 383 
3428,1630 2951 
3415 1 1669 4071 
3361 1617 371 
3229 1578 413 
3588 1651 382 
15323 1707 324 
34141 1740 484 



63 5574 
78:5670 









926 
925 
925 
915 
913 
933 
915 



57 5678 
1345970 
66 5419 
66.5557 
94, 5443!. 914 
72 52y2j.iX»8 
95,57161.916 
62[5416|.927 
80,57181.901 



Tie games are inelude<l in number of pamcs played. 

Tiepamos- Boston. 2; Pitt.sburph. 2-. Cleveland, 1; Philadelphia, 4; New York. 4; 
Cinoinnati, 3; Brooklyn, 2, Chicago, 1; St. Louis, 3; Louisville, 1; Washingrton, L 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



8l 



EASTERN LEAGUE AVERAGES. 

OFFICIAL FIGURES FOR INDIVIDUAL AND CLUB BATTING AND 
FIELDING FOR 1 893. 

Below will be found the official batting and fielding aver- 
age of the Eastern League clubs and players for the season 
of 1893 as furnished by President P. T. Powers: 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING AVERAGES. 





1 
1 

Name. 


C'LL'B. 


m 

s 



i 

< 




PQ 


ai 

16 
24 
13 

16 

7 

4 

21 

41 

29 

21 

8 

5 

I 

9 

1 

1 
16 

6 
16 
22 

6 


cq 
x 

10 
42 
28 
22 
10 
20 
31 
18 
13 
18 
11 
■1-. 

"5 
5 

12 

4 
39 
60 

2 

2 
39 

5 
47 
18 

4 
43 

6 
18 
38 
75 

7 
24 

5 
26 

1 
10 
13 

6 
02 
30 
19 

3 
44 




1 


Drauby 


Buffalo 


105 
99 
95 
91 

65 

72 

103 

110 

113 

113 

&'2 

50 

21 

41 

17 

82 

28 

114 

95 

10 

17 

98 

28 

109 

76 

38 

104 

38 

111 

101 

115 

96 

63 

27 

109 

20 

103 


44 

415 
442 

402 
280 
319 
415 
461 
458 
462 
324 
210 

69 
138 

72 
338 
113 
472 
397 

35 

70 
398 
124 
457 
312 
167 
425 
153 
480 
395 
457 
362 
250 
110 
458 

71 
444 


114 
121 
107 
93 
62 
77 
141 
ll.J 
114 
95 
78 
44 
17 
28 
21 
80 
25 
106 
11 fi 
10 
12 
117 
25 
104 
51 
34 
95 
41 
127 
86 
140 
79 
51 
28 
109 
14 
87 
42 
54 
45 
61 
42 
29 
138 


157 
157 
166 
148 
103 
114 
145 
161 
160 
161 
113 
73 
24 
48 
25 
117 
39 
162 
136 
12 
24 
135 
42 
155 
05 
56 
142 
61 


379 





Gilbert 

Knight 


Springlield 


378 


s 


Binghamton 


375 


\ 


Bonuer 


Wilkesbarre 


368 


f> 


Shea 


Binghamton 


367 


8 


Lachauce 


Wilkesbarre 


357 


7 


Botteines. 


Springfield 


349 




(Rowe 


Buffalo 


349 


8 


\ Stearna 

(Wolf 


Buffalo 


349 




Buffalo 


348 


8 


1 Griffin 


Buffalo 

Providence 


348 




f Lyons 

I Peoples 

'i Inks 

[Polhemus 

Lally.. 


347 




Erie ... . 4 


347 


y 


Binghamton, Springfield 

Wilkesbarre 


.347 
347 


10 


Erie 

Albany 


346 


11 


Knovvles. 


345 


1*^ 




Ti'oy 


.343 




( Lynch 


Springfield 


342 


13 


< Schellei-iuan . . . 
( Carey 


Buffalo 


342 




Binghamton 


342 


14 


G. Smith 


Binghamton . ... 


339 


If) 


Bradley 


Springfield 


338 


16 


jFriel 

1 Phillips 

Wood. 


Providence 

Troy 


.336 
336 


17 


Wilkesbarre 


335 


18 




Erie 


334 




(Whistler 

Daily 

(Donnelly 

i Eagan 


Albany 


333 


19 


Buffalo 


160 15 
132 33 
152,19 
119 i 15 
82 11 
36 6 
149 40 
23| 3 
144 26 


333 




Troy 


333 




Albany 


332 


W 


\ Ryan 

(Stalz.. 




.398 




Wilkesbarre 


328 


•^1 


E.Daley «... 

Visner . 


Buffalo 


.327 


^f) 


Albany 


326 


9R 


Dooley 


Troy 


.325 


04 






3'?4 




( Dowse 


Buffalo Wilkesbarre 


62 235 
66 2;i3 
49 177 


76 
85 
57 
87 
79 


8 
8 
J 
5 
3 


3?3 


2b 


(Wilson. .!'. 

Campion 


xVlbany 


,323 


">« 


Providence . 


.322 


'>:i 


Deady 


Providence, Binghamton 

Providence 


61 

58 
40 


271 
247 
131 


.321 


?8 


Rogers 

(Barnett 

IScheffler 


319 




Binghamton 


43 8 
14619 


,,318 


2y 


Troy . . . , 


113 458 


.318 



82 Spalding's official 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING AVERAGES. — Continued. 



31 



34 



Name. 



Slattery 

Coughlin 

32' Swart wood. . 
ool i Sales 

Scliiebeck 

Johnson . . 

Boyd 

„,i jCampfield. 

"^ ) Seery ISpringfield 

36 Weckbecker [Albany 



VVilkesb'e, Provid'e, Bingli't'n 

Springfield 

Providence 

V\'ilkesbarre 

Erie 101 418 

IToy 113 448 

Buttalo I 39 144 

Biughaniton, Wilkesbarre. 



90 371 
30 120 
39 140 
102 411 



45 



Troy 

Troy, Wilkesbarre. . . 

Albany 

Troy, Springfield 

Erie 

Albany, Troy, Bmialo 

Albany , 

Wilkesbarre , 

Albany 

Burtalo , 

Springfield ' 34 

Albany 87 

Albany *. 21 

Bingliauiton ' 15 

Troy ! 50 

Albany 

Wilkesbarre. 
Wilkesbarre. 



I (Collins. 
51 Kuehue. 



37 Pickett 
! ( Breckenridge 

38 nianralian 

I ( Miller 

39 Nicholsou 

40,iMorelock 

( Hess 

4lW Lake 

I \ Willis 

42 lT(iuhart 

43 Leahy 

44 -Minnehan 

I S Ivennedy 

\ Keeler 

46 Gruber 

47:Knox 

48 Cainpau 

49. Irwin 

e^l S Burns Springfield 

^'^Pavne Albany.... 

Huilalo 

Erie ... 

I (Stockdale. ... 

52'\Vlieelock 

53 Basse tt 

54jStanhope 

55' Van DvKe 

56 r.oodail 

57 CahilL 

68 Pettit 

I ( Fields 

59 I Shannon 

I ( Hornung j Providence 

60 Mays Erie 

61 Briggs Binghamton 

62 Maguire Erie 

cJ J Jnd Smith Binghamton, Wilkesbarre 

"-^1 \ Kappel Albany 

~A I G. Henry Wilkesbarre 

") Lang Binghamton 



33 129 
103 415 



Wilkesbarre. 
Wilkesbarre. 
Providence.. 
Binghamton. 

Erie 

Wilkesbarrt 

Troy , 

Providence. . 

Erie 

Springfield . . 



65 Berger Erie 

-Aj J Whalen \ Providence 

°°' ( Ruckel 'Binghamton, Wilkesbarre. . . 



42 
418 
375 
453 
63 
399 
69 
368 
375 
136 
264 
134 
359 
85 
6S 
150 
99 367 
18| 84 
62 253 
68 268 
64 j 247 
76297 
90 370 
15 49 
2ol05 
96 380 
35159 
98 '396 
38 119 
98,419 
103'421 
104 395 
103 421 
5.3' 216 
43148 
73 289 
111 41 
18 75 
10 38 
74,298 
93 339 
78;288 
14 55 
16' 59 



911117 

18 38 

40 44 

79129 
120 13111 

96 140 1 19 14 
7 
51 



14 23 



31 45| 4 
24 401 6 
134 129 30 

2 13.. 
93129 21 22 
95JII5 12 14 
96,139,2516 

11 19| 4 2, 
93,122 15 70 
14 2l| o| 8 
65111 15 6 
90 103 18, 271 
29| 411 8 
51 80:12 
291 40 7 
106 18 



317 
316 
314 
313 
313 
312 
312 
310 
310 



25 2 
20! 5 
44 13 

107, 9 
24i 6 
73 14 
7712 
7112 
85 17 

10617 



14 

30 
108 20 27 

45; 61 8 
no 16 40 

33 8 4 
116 29 29 
116 21 43 
lOS 30 13 



12b 
55 


11) yo 

59 12 


48 
19 


28 


40l 6 


4 


62 


78 15 


4 


10 


11 2 


3 


17 


20 1 


6 


13 


10 


3 


51 


79 7 


35 


loo 


90 10 


35 


49 


75 12 


11 


7 


14| 3 


6 


6 


I5I 2 


3' 



.306 
.306 
.306 
.305 
.304 
.301 
.301 
.301 
.299 
.298 
.295 
.294 
.294 
.293 
.291 
.290 
.288 
.287 
.287 
.286 
286 
286 
285 
.284 
283 
.278 
.277 
.276 
275 
.273 
.273 
.273 
.270 



266 
.266 
265 
•265 
260 
254 
254 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 83 

INDIVIDUAL BATTING AVERAGES. Conti)nied. 



Name 



Club. 



Devlin 

Bausewiue, 
Claik 

McLaugliliu.. 

Shinnick 

D. tSuliivau... 

Messitt 

„ol J Hoover 

'•^ 1 McKeougli. 

Heine 

Cooney 

Fricken 

Callihan 



Zinran , 

Sweeney. . . , 

Fisher 

Sigsby 

Nicol , 

Madden 

Murphy 

Conley 

Fouruier 

Cross 

Rudderhani. 
J. Sullivan.. , 
Fitzgerald . . 



Troy 

{Albany.; 

Erie 

\\ ilkesbarre 

jwilkesbarre 

Providence 

Albany 

I Albany 

Providence 

Bingh't'n, Buffalo, Providence 

Providence 

Wilkesbarre, Troy, Albany 

Albany 

Buffalo, Providence 

Erie 

Hinghamton 

Buffalo 

Troy 

Erie 

l^rovidence 

Troy 

Biughamton. 

Albany, Buffalo, Ti oy 

Buffalo, Troy 

Providence 



Wilkesbarre, Providence 







<i; 






2 te 


§ 


» 


B 


ca 












C < 


13 


35 


00 



13 


41138 


3U107 


16 


27 


3 


2 


50 170 


26 


43 


7 


5 


46 16i 


27 


41 


6 


5 


63 241 


46 


60 


1520 


17 


45 


4 


11 


4 


2^ 


25 


78 


19 


19 


4 


13; 


1 -^3 


91 


11 


22 


3 


1| 


107 


360 


55 


87 


18 23 


96i354 


62 


85 


31 '41 


861355 


57 


84 


33,36 


27 85 


8 


20 


5 


4 


48'l58 


25 


37 


10 


7 


35,121 


18 


28 


4 





20 


70 


8 


16 


'I 


1 


57 


149 


22 


55 


5 


1 


37 


132 


18 


29 


8 


1 


n 


33 


6 


7 





3 


25 


85 


9 


18 


4 


4 


25 


69 


14 


14 


4 


5 


64 


221 


24 


44 


10 


8 


91 


350 


59 


67 


16 


8 


23 


87 


11 


16 


2 





38 


127 


25 


23 


7 


24 


26 


78 


10 


14 


3 


3 


59 


195 


22 


34 


8 


7 


18 


53 


11 


9 


3 


4 



.253 

.252 
.252 
.250 
.249 
.244 
.243 
.241 
.241 
.240 
.236 
.235 
.234 
.231 
.228 
.220 
.219 
.212 
.211 
.202 
.199 
.191 
.184 
.181 
179 
174 



FIRST BASE AVERAGES. 



Name. 



Kennedy 

Hess 

i Couly 

"I Wilson 

( Irwin 

( Rogers 

Breckenridge 

Whistler 

Dooley 

( Campion . . . 

(Fields 

Stearns 

Lehanp 



Club. 



Albany 

Albany 

Binghamton 

Albany 

Wilkesbarre 

Providence 

Troy, Wilkesbarre 

Albany 

Troy 

Providence 

Erie 

Buffalo 

Springfield 



















aj 






^ 


t 


£ 




"w 


^ 


ci 











P^ 


<; 


W 


21 


198 


2 


3 


16 


169 


4 


3 


91 


976 


18 


18 


16 


166 


1 


3 


61 


695 


44 


16 


58 


569 


17 


12 


105 


1055 


39 


24 


38 


396 


17 


11 


20 


191 


6 


5 


49 


526 


24 15 1 


104 


1093 


67 


31 


111 


1077 


42 


36 


103 


935 


35 


33 



.979 
.979 
.978 
.976 
.975 
.973 
.973 



84 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



SECOND BASE AVERAGES. 



i 


Name. 


CLUI5. 


5 


2 

o 

I 


X 

1 

< 


o 




1 


NicUolson 

Pickett 

Eagan 

Burns 

Wheclock 


Erie 


104 
100 
115 
68 
26 
110 
103 
98 
63 
2s 
11 


297 

30.T 

327 

194 

72 

318 

238 

211 

201 

40 

18 


342 

268 
328 
179 
75 
315 
279 
287 
186 
66 
31 


36 
36 
45 
27 
11 
44 
46 
11 
44 
14 
7 


.946 


? 


Troy 


.940 


s 


Albanv 


935 


4 
ft 


Springtiekl 

W ilkesbiirre 

Bullalo 

Providence 


.932 
.929 


6 
7 


Rowe 

Pettit 

Smith 

Shinnick 


.920 
.918 


8 


Biufibamton 


905 


9 
10 


Wilkesi.arre 

Spriugliiid 

Wilkesbarre 


.898 
883 


11 


Staltz 


.875 



THIRD BASE AVERAGES. 



Briggs 

Shea 

Bassett 

Minnehan . 

J Donnelly. 

Kappel. . . 



Sales. 
Kuehne.. 
Drauby . , 
Keeler . . , 

11 Gilbert.., 

12 Magiiire . 

13 Knowles, 



10 



Biughanitou. 
Biiigliaiiitou 
Providence.. 

Albany 

Troy 

Albany 

Wilkesbarre 

Erie 

Buffalo 

Blnghaniton. 
Springfield.. 

Erie 

Albany 



1 1^ 


30 


23 


5 


65 


87 


154 


29 


96 


158 


248 


48 


SO 


119 


168 


39 


101 


166 


265 


63 


10 


39 


15 


8 


102 


124 


267 


59 


90 


92 


205 


47 


101 


152 


228 


62 


15 


29 


38 


11 


99 


141 


245 


69 


11 


16 


32 


9 


26 


34 


55 


20 



SHORT STOP AVERAGES. 



Uoouy 

Cross 

Lang 

Bonner — 

Heine 

Shannon. . 

7 Scheibcc k 

8 Collins . . . . 

9 Hanrahau. 
10Phillii)3... 
Ill E.Daley .. 



Providence 

iTroy and Bullalo. 

.Kinghanitoa 

I Wilkesbarre 

'Providence 

Springlicld 

iKrie 

Bullalo 

Albany 

Troy 

Bntlalo 



86 


150 


300 43 


38 


97 


130 24 


93 


204 


355 68 


91 


227 


302 75 


17 


28 


5413 


103 


191 


326 84 


101 


217 


389 99 


71 


131 


249 65 


111 


184 38(i 99 


76 


13H 155 57 


27 


33 


74 25| 



FIELDERS AVERAGES. 



Dowse , 

Campau 

Wolfe 

Messitt 

Simon 

Knox 

(Van Dyke. 

jUess 

Visner 

Griflln 



Wilkesbarre and Butlalo. 

Wilkesbarre , 

Buffalo 

Albany 

Troy 

Albany 

Erie 

Albany 

Albany 

Bullalo 



21 


35 


4 





18 


45 


4 


2 


110 


106 


24 


12 


20 


45 


3 


3 


114 


284 


18 


19 


97 


205 


43 


19 


98 


lti7 


20 


15 


13 


83 


4 


3 


lOit 


229 


29 


21 


81 


197 


7 


17 



1.000 
.960 
.948 
.941 
.940 
.928 
.925 
.925 
.9ii4 
.923 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 85 

FIELDING AVERAGES. — C07ltinued. 



1 


Name. 


Club. 


xn 







i 

19 
22 
19 
20 
26 
6 
28 

.^ 

3 

6 

22 
19 

^^ 

33 
5 
21 
27 
13 
20 
4 
5 

22 
16 



u 


10 


Lynch 


Springfield .... 


83 

100 

95 

111 

103 

30 

111 

12 

59 

74 

46 

16 

38 

82 

90 

50 

104 

103 

23 

50 

113 

39 

53 

17 

15 

64 

35 


175 

215 

175 

162 

236 

57 

250 

18 

97 

142 

95 

26 

48 

172 

149 

108 

159 

226 

37 

141 

248 

74 

116 

23 

21 

89 

40 


30 

15 

16 

35 

19 

1 

20 

1 

16 

16 

9 



3 

11 

5 

14 

17 

24 



12 

25 

9 

7 

1 

3 

11 

14 


.915 


11 


Friel 


Providence 


.912 


T> 


Knight 


Binghamtou .... 


.909 




( Sclieffler 


Troy 


.907 


13 


1 Bottenus 


Springfield 


.907 


^h 


Willis 


Albany 

Buffalo 


.906 


ifi 


Daily 

Urquhart 

Heine 


.905 


17 


Buffalo 


.904 


18 


Providence,B'gh'l'n& Buffalo 
Wilkesl)ari e 


.903 


1^) 


Henry 


.897 




1 Lachauce 

\ Leahy 


Wilkesbarre .' 


.896 


2U 


Springfield 


.896 


9'^ 


Wood 


Wilkesbarre 


.894 


?3 


Lilly 


Krie 


.892 




(Slattery 


Wilkesbarre and Biughamton 
Providence 


.890 


^4 


(Hornuug 


890 


?fi 


Shearon 


Erie 


.888 


';^7 


Seery 


Springfield 


883 


w 


Hoover 


Albany 


.880 


^q 


Lyons 


Providence . 


.879 


SO 


Johnson 


Troy 


.876 


'^l 


Swartwood . 


Providence 


.864 


R') 


Staltz 

Polhemus 


Wilkesbarre 


.862 


8.S 


Wilkesbarre 

Wilkesbarre . . 


857 


SI 


Lake 

Deady 

Stanhope 


.810 


35 
36 


Providence and Wilkesbarre. 
Binghamton 


.805 
.771 



CATCHERS AVERAGES. 



a 


Name. 


Club. 


i 
a 

60 
93 
63 
91 
101 
78 
21 
47 
50 
51 
73 
39 
18 
18 
35 
39 
13 



t 

197 
275 
225 
401 
487 
317 
102 
202 
180 
206 
263 
139 
64 
89 
110 
159 
31 


1 
< 

40 

144 

35 

104 

101 

78 

25 

61 

48 

57 

54 

40 

8 

19 

27 

42 

13 


i 

6 

14 
11 
27 
23 
22 

7 
15 
14 
16 
21 
13 

5 
10 
13 
21 

6 


11 

15 
14 
19 
21 
19 
4 
15 
13 
19 
19 
7 
6 
6 

9 
2 


a 


1 


Wilson 




975 


?, 


Cahill 


Troy 


965 


3 


Hess 


Albany 

Springfield . . .... 


959 


4 


Ryan 


956 


5 


McKeough 


Providence 


955 




(Lake 


Wilkesbarre 

trie 


947 


b 


1 Peeples 


94T 


8 


Urquhart 


[Juffalo 


946 




( Sweeney 


Binghamtou . . , 


94'?f 




( Briggs 


Binghamtou 


94?: 


11 


Berger 


Erie 


938 


1^ 


Boyd 


Buffalo 


9391 


13 


Leahy 


Springfield 

Wilkesbarre ^ 

Troy 


99'5| 


14 
15 


Lachance 

Murphy 


.915 
913 


16 


Dowse 


Wilkesbarre and Buffalo 

Erie 


906 


17 


Zinran 


.880 



86 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



(The pitchers' tables are incomplete, as there is no record showing the 
victories and defeats pitched in by each pitcher.) 

pitchers' fielding averages. 



a 


Name. 


Cub. 


U 

s 

o 

30 
14 
25 
39 
11 
47 
21 
45 
47 
49 
17 
16 
35 
37 
29 
26 
46 
47 
41 
41 
25 
26 
33 
IS 


3 
1 

12 

15 
7 
3 
36 
7 
10 
10 
30 

8 
9 

14 
10 
9 
8 
37 
13 
6 
3 
6 
18 
10 


1 

< 

49 
47 

.^ 
.J: 

45 
92 
104 
82 
38 
36 
67 
69 
30 
41 
86 
83 
79 
47 
50 
28 
49 
23 
43 
20 
34 
81 
22 


c 
t 

1 
1 
3 
7 
1 

11 
4 
8 
9 

I 
4 

8 

4 
5 
10 
13 
10 
6 
6 
4 
8 
4 
7 
3 
5 
7 
6 


a 
o 


1 
2 

8 


Couglilin 

Daryea 

Nicol 

Barnett 

Sigsbee 

Calihan 

Miller 

Gruber 

J. Sullivan 

Payne 

C\irey 

Mays 

( barr 


Springlield 

Hiughamtou 

Eric 


.983 
.979 
958 


4 
5 


1 liughamtou 

Trov 


.938 
9S7 


6 

7 


Albany 

Springfield and Trov 


.929 
9'>8 


R 


Trov 


927 


Q 


I'ro vidence 


906 


10 
11 


Albany 

lUnghamton 

Erie 


.925 
.918 
916 


, 


BuilUlo and Providence 

BuinUo 


912 


lo 


1 Fisher 

) Goodall 

1 Bausewcin. . . 
-McLiughlin.. .. 
Clark 


911J 


,. 


Wilkesbarre 


909 


IS 


Albany 

Wilkesbarre 

Erie 

Trov 


.909 
.903 
902 


10 


Devlin 

Inks 

Rudderham.. .. 

Fricken 

Canipiield 

Fitzgerald 

Fournier 

D. Sullivan 

lUickcl 

.Midden 

Stocksdale 


901 


20 
21 
22 
23 
^4 


Springfield and Biughamtun 

I'rovidence 

Troy, Albany and Wilkesbarre 

Biuirhaniton and Wilkesbarre 

Wilkesbarre and Prmidence 


.898 
.896 
.894 
.893 
891 


25 
20 
27 
28 


Bullalo, Albany and Binghamton 

Providence 

Binghamton and Wilkesbarre 

i'rovidence 


23 14 
15 4 
15 2 

24 13 
15 15 


.890 
.888 
878 
862 


29 


Wilkesbarre 


.860 



Note.— The preceding is the pitcher'.s fielding averages, but it was 
inipossii)k' to make a table showing the pitchers' etrectiveness. as the score 
sheets were not properly made out in games where two or more pitchers 
played, there being no record of times at bat, earned runs, and base hits 
made otleach pitcher. 



CLL'li BATTING AVERAGES. 



1 


Cll-b. 


8 


1" 

40S2 
3S10 
o774 

412;; 

3S.-,:] 

4055 
376S 


o 
OS 

9.30 
989 
763 
S91 
S40 
846 

:.s9 

647 


3 

1326 
1185 
1155 
124(5 
1157 
1214 
1078 
1087 


c 
a; 


1 


Bullalo 


114 
103 
104 
117 
101 
117 
101 


304 


'2 


Springfield 


311 


,3 


Wilkesbarre 


306 


4 


Albany 


301 


i) 


Binghamton 


300 


<) 


Troy 


•»99 


7 


Erie 


286 


8 


Providence i 


112 


3925 


.276 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 
CLUB FIELDING AVERAGES. 



87 



Club. 



Troy 

j Providence. 

( Albany 

Erie 

Binghamtou . 
Wilkesbarre . 
Springfield... 
Buffalo 



2962 
2949 
3015 
2731 
2664 
2656 
2702 
3007 



1364 
1391 
1352 
1414 
1288 
1360 
1242 
1451 



.927 
.923 
.923 
.922 
.917 
.916 
.915 
.914 



For the first time in the history of the organization, the 
Eastern League of professional base ball clubs held its 
annual Spring meeting in New York. President Patrick C. 
Powers occupied the chair, delegates representing Albany, 
Binghamton, Buffalo, Troy, Providence, Wilkesbarre, 
Springfield and Syracuse being present. The first business 
was the consideration of the League's circuit committee 
report. The committee stated that they had investigated 
the affairs at both Albany and Syracuse, and reported in 
favor of Syracuse in place of Albany retired. At the after- 
noon session the Spalding ball was officially adopted, and 
the umpire question was considered. After discussion an 
amendment was carriea which will, in the future, allow an 
umpire to fine a player not more than twice — $5 for the first 
and $10 for the second offense, and for any further abuse 
expulsion from the game. 

THE NEW ENGLAND I^EAGUE'S AVERAGES. 

The following are the official tables sent in by President 
T. Murnane: 

Batting Records — 1893. 




Pennell 

Mains 

A. Lezotte..., 

Rogers 

Sheehan 

Smith 

Cotter 

fDeady 

I Harrington 

Mationey 

Hanivan 



Lewiston. 
Portland. 
Lewiston. 
Portland . 
Lewiston. 
Portland. 
Brockton. 
Portland . , 
Fall River 
Portland., 
Dover 









iS 


















<11 


nS 


rh 






« 


a 


% 


ri 




P 







-=11 


« 


P5 


38 


155 


38 


64 


86 


373 


80 


139 


92 


403 


100 


144 


48 


226 


49 


79 


90 


399 


114 


137 


89 


396 


98 


133 


74 


331 


68 


110 


43 


204 


53 


6.S 


86 


384 


111 


128 


50 


203 


37 


67 


42 


177 


36 


58 



.413. 
.373 
.357 
.354 



335 
333 
333 



S8 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



BATTING RECORDS. — Continued. 



N'AMK. 



Cl.DB. 



12 



13 



23 



42 



60 



Ladd 

Clark 

Ryan 

Whitney. ... 

Wheeler 

Hickey 

Spill 

19Farrel! 

( Burns 

20 { Flanigan . . . . 

I ( Viaii 

|Fitzjj:erakl... 

(Guinasso 

«-| iXulton 

j I Fitzniaurice , 
27!Burrell 

28 Clymer 

29 Klobedaiiz 

30 1). Burke 

SllLeightou 

32 Doe 

33 Garry 

o, (Bradv 

"** 1 Corbett 

36 Cook 

37 McCaulev 

qoMO'Neil 

ni Ward 

40;j. Lezotte 

411 Slater 

T. O'Brien. .. 

W. Burke . . . 

''44; Sullivan 

Mercer 

Reilly 

Fennel ly 

Flack 

Van Alstine... 
T. Hart 

61 Ciidwortli 

52 McCormack . . . 

53 T. .McDertnott . 
; Morelock . . . . 

J. Burke 

Meagher 

(Piatt 

{Doyle 

(H. Hart 

j Donahue 

( Morse 

62 Kirmes 

63 Ziinmer 

64 J. O-Brien 



Fall River 

Brockton 

Brockton 

Boston Reds 

Lewiston 

Brockton 

Lewiston 

Boston Reds 

Portland 

Dover 

Fall River 

Brockton 

Boston Reds 

Brockton 

Brockton 

Pall River 

Portland 

Portland, Dover 

Brockton 

Lewiston 

Brockton 

Dover 

Fall River 

Brockton 

Dover 

Boston Reds 

Fall River 

Brockton, Boston Reds. 

Lewiston 

Dover, i'ortland 

Bo.ston Reds 

Portland 

Dover, Boston Reds.... 

Dover 

Fall River, Dover 

Fall River 



56 222 

74 319 

89 368 
35 132 

61 250 

62 2-40 
31 116 
24| 81 
88 '344 
59 252 

75 296 
59 260 
48 1 186 
38jll4 
85 330 

90 3641 
Boston Reds '83 341 



oc 






I & 






3 


c <; 


« 


87 349 


83| 


75 324 


70 


65 262 


56 


58 210 


47 


39 148 


36 


24 


99 


20 



92 
54:232 
89 382 
57 227 
36 1 101 
75 306 
69 25S 
37151 
17 74 
89 389 
87 368 
49 173 
74 306 



99 122 
43 73 
92 121 
■2 



89 113' 

37| 53; 

40 93' 

3761100113' 



40 


66 


65 


04 


95 


108 


11 


39 


47 


73 


47 


70 


20 


33 


1'* 


23 


76 


97 


f6 


70 


56 


8-2 


4.; 


72 


33 


50 


25 


31 



Fall River... 

LewlsUin 

Boston Reds 

Lewiston 

F-all River. 



861328 
90,351 
17 1 66 
91 3 
90 391 



Dover, Portland ..'. 54;20st 



Boston R^ds 

Boston Reds 

Portland 

Dover 

Fall River, Boston Reds . 

Dover 

Dover 39 

Brockton .67 

Fall River |39 

Brockton 15 



20 90 
82 311 
41il68 
20 84 
41|164 
65:259 
140 



.327 
.324 
.324 
.324 
.324 
323 
.320 
.319 
.317 
.317 
.317 
.314 
.314 
.311 
.311 
.308 
.307 
.306 
.304 
.:-01 
.297 
.295 
.294 
.294 
.292 
.290 
.284 
.284 
.282 
.278 
.277 
.277 
.269 
.272 
.270 
.270 
.267 
.262 
.259 
.258 
.251 
.248 
.244 
.244 
.241 
.238 
,238 
.238 
.236 
.236 
.236 
233 
228 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 89 

BATTING RECORDS. — Continued. 



Name. 



65 O'Connell. 

66 Uil worth., 

67 Bradley.. 



Lincoln 

Moore 

Rudderham, 
F. O'Brien. . . 

Welch 

Dunning. ... 

Ferson 

Kiley 

Long 



Club. 



Dover 

Portland 

Dover 

Fall River 

Dover, Portland 

Boston Reds 

Dover 

Lewiston 

Brockton 

Lewiston 

Brockton, Boston Reds. 
Brockton 









tn 


















(t) 






ffi 


F 


^ 


03 




ITl 




S 







< 


Pi 


« 


80 


312 


45 


70 


22 


81 


10 


17! 


23 


98 


19 


20 


31 


113 


17 


23 


83 


313 


46 


63 


25 


77 


9 


15 


23 


99 


15 


19 


21 


75 


16 


14 


16 


60 


13 


11 


20 


66 


11 


12 


51 


152 


23 


26 


25 


98 


13 


16 



.224 
.210 
.207 
.204 
.201 
.195 
,192 
.187 
.183 
.182 
.171 
.163 



Fielding Records — 1893. 



FIRST BASEMEN. 



Name. 



T. O'Brien . 
Flanigan . . . 
J. Lezotte.. 

Rogers 

Slater 

Cotter 

Harrington. 



Boston Reds.... 

Dover 

Lewiston 

Portland. 

Dover, Portland. 

Brockton 

Fall River 





^ 






XT\ 





E 


aa 


1 





.2 





Oj 


e 


w 







< 


W 





— 








74 


746 


21 


9 


57 


531 


23 


18 


88 


788 


34 


30 


48 


459 


24 


19 


59 


558 


22 


25 


74 


867 


25 


41 


86 


856 


27 


43 



.970 
.965 



956 
954 



SECOND BASEMEN. 





(T. McDermott 

( Meagher 


Fall River 


90 
82 
51 
35 
31 
89 


302 
243 
143 
110 
58 
225 


270 
241 
134 
126 
22 
180 


48 
52 
25 
25 
10 
67 


.923 


1 


Boston Reds 

Lewiston 


903 


9, 


Moore 


917 


3 


Corbett 


Brockton 


904 


ft 


Morelock 


Dover 


870 


6 


Smith 


Portland 


858 











THIRD BASEMEN. 



1 


Van Alstine 


Fall River 


86 
58 
20 
89 
91 
67 


134 
96 

28 
129 
137 

87 


216 
147 
39 
200 
223 
145 


44 
31 
9 
53 
66 
46 


888 


9 


Whitney 


Boston Reds 


887 


.s 


Doyle 

Burns 


Dover 


882 


4 


Portland 


Sfil 


5 


McCormack 


Lewiston 


845 


6 


Kirmes 


Brockton 


.835 



90 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 
SHORT STOPS. 



M 


Name. 


Club 


OJ 

87 
37 
92 
23 
90 
18 
42 
54 
32 
24 


s 

o 

s 

251 
ti2 

151 
35 

122 
28 
62 
79 
57 
42 


2G7 

131 

347 

61 

328 

57 

82 

93 

87 

85 


W 

48 
18 
67 
12 
80 
16 
28 
35 
34 
30 


a 
<u 
o 




( Clvmer 


Portland 


qi5 


i 


( Nulton. 


Hiockton 


915 


3 


Spill 




881 


4 


Bradley . 


Dover 


889 


I 


Fennelly 


Fall Rivtr 

Hostou Reds 


849 


6 


H. Hart 


84? 


7 


Hanivan 


Dover 


837 


R 


Farrell 


Ucston J{e(ls 


831 


q 


Moore 


Portland 


809 


10 


Uickey 


Dover ... 


803 









FIELDERS. 



liCudworth. 

2 Brady 

3 Morelock . 

4 Leigh ton.. 

5 Sheehan. . 

Ward 

Ladd 

Garry .... 

Flack 

Burke.. .. 
V. Lezotte. 
Reilly . . . . 
Deady .... 

( Cook 

Ih. Hart. 

Fitzgerald. 

.1. O'Brien. 



Boston lieds. 
Fall River. . . 
Portland. ... 
Lewiston,. . 
Lewistou — 
Boston Reds. 
Fall River . . 

Dover 

Boston Reds. 
Portland. . . . 

Lewiston 

Fall River... 

Portland 

Dover 

Fall River . . 
Brockton. . . 
Brockton 



17 

891147 
23 
.90 218 
90182 
!lS| 9 
187141 
,174 158 
|82 157 
'59 110 
|92 108 
31 



2 


3 


23 


10 


3 


3 


20 


21 


15 


19 


9 


2 


20 


18 


17 


2a 


56 


29 


8 


18 


16 


19 


9 


7 


6 


15 


12 


23 


6 


9 


11 


24 


2 


10 



.952 
.944 
.932 
.913 
.912 
.900 
.899 



.868 
.867 
.865 
.851 
.827 
.827 
.776 
.737 



CATCHERS. 



1 


Donaluu' 


Dover 

Portland 

Lewiston 

P'all River . . . 


65 
50 
90 
S9 
41 
74 
62 
39 
54 
31 
17 
69 


358 

190 

398 

428 

150 

3SS 

2!)8 

94 

85 

86 

35 

121 


86 
68 
79 
62 
35 
88 
55 
6 
102 
25 

■ 3^ 


22 

It 
?. 

38 
34 
10 
28 
14 
10 
49 


053 


9. 


Malionev 


949 




S T. Hai-i 


946 


6 


"/ Burreli 


.946 


5 


Piatt 


Portland 

Brockton 

i?oston Reds 

Fall River 

Dover 

Boston Reds 

Brockton 

Boston Reds 


944 


6 


D. Burke 


9?5 




.VIcCaulev 


91? 


8 


Ziinraer 


909 


10 


Reillv 


870 


9 


O'Connor. . 


F88 


11 

12 


Fitzmaurice 

Guinasso 


.810 

.840 



1| Welch 

2iRudderh;ini. 

3 Morse 

5! ,> Ryan 

''l I Ddworth ., 



, liCwiston. . 
.Boston Reds. 

. Dover 

. I Brockton 

. I Portland 



21 17: 50| 1 .985 

,25 10 48 3, .961 

|39 34 871 8 .938 

165 1041 431 15'. 907 

122 81 32I 4. 909 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



91 



:i 


Name. 


Club. 


i 

39 

31 

49 
51 
31 
36 

20 
38 
15 
86 
56 
16 
47 


"S 


Cl- 
io 

8 
37 
40 

8 
14 

9 
32 

6 
145 
76 
10 
39 


< 

It 

53 
74 

78 
62 
33 
68 
21 
62 
62 
20 
45 


00 

g 

10 

9 
10 
13 
10 

9 

5 
18 

4 
17 
24 

6 
17 


+3 

1 


6 


Wheeler 

Lincoln 


Lewiston 


904 


7 


Fall River 


90? 


8 




Portland, Dover 


900 


q 


Kiley ... 


Brockton, Boston Reds 

Fall River 


sqfi 


10 


O'Neill 


896 




i Viau 


Fall River 


894 


11 


) Person 


Lewiston 


894 


1f^ 


Mercer 


Dover 


S74 


14 


Gray 


Boston Reds 


871 


15 


Mains 


Portland -. 

Brockton 


864 


Ifi 


Doe 


85? 


17 


Dunning 


Brock ton 


833 


18 


Sullivan 


Dover, Boston Reds 


831 











The following pitchers took part in less than fifteen but 
not less than ten games: 



1 


Clare 


Portland 


10 
14 
10 
14 
12 


6 
8 
3 
6 
3 


18 

11 

19 
4 


1 


960 


? 


Madden 


Portland 


2 
2 
4 
3 


9^6 


s 


Stevens 


Lewiston 


900 


4 


StatTord 


Lewi.ston 


86?, 


5 


Wilson 


Boston Reds 


700 















This is the correct method of record for the pitchers' 
averages, the earned run data being useless under the 
existing scoring rules : 

pitchers' averages — 1893. 



a 
1 


Name. 


Club. 


C3 

29 
20 
16 
31 
25 
29 
27 
22 
25 
20 
17 
22 
29 
22 
16 
17 

'I 

9 
12 


1 

22 
14 
11 

20 
16 
17 
15 
11 
12 
9 

9 
11 

8 
5 
5 
7 
5 
5 
5 


7 
6 
5 
11 
9 
12 
12 
11 
13 
11 
10 
13 
IS 
14 
11 
12 
5 
4 
4 
7 


a 



1 


Lincoln. 

Person 


Fall River 


759 





Lewiston 


700 


3 


Mains 


Portland 


688 


A 


Wheeler 


Lewiston 


645 


5 


Viau 


Fall River 


640 


6 


O'Neill 


Dover, Fall River 


^90 




Mercer . . . 


Dover 


566 


8 


Doe 


Brockton 


500 


q 


Morse, , . 


Dover 


480 


10 


Welch 


Lewiston 


-150 


n 


Dihvorth 

Rudderham 


Portland 


41? 


12 


Boston Reds 


409 


13 


Kiley 


Brockton Boston Reds 


380 


14 


Klobedanz 


Portland, Dover 

Dover, Boston Reds 


,",64 


15 


Sullivan 


312 


16 


Ryan 


Lewiston, Brockton 


?,94 


17 


Stafford 


Lewiston. 


.583 


18 


j Madden 


Portland . • 


5,56 


1 Stevens".".",'" .. 


Lewiston 


556 


20 


Gray 


Boston Reds 


.417 



9-^ 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 
THE MONTHLY PKKCENTAGE. 



The progress made by each club each month of the cam- 
paign in the pennant race, as shown by the monthly percent- 
age figures, makes up an interesting table, as the appended 
record shows : 



MoNTHiA' Percentages. 


< 

..500 
.000 
1.000 
..500 
..500 
..500 


1 

.591 
..560 
.444 
.462 
.654 
.500 
.364 
.458 
.133 
.440 

..581 


1 

•-3 

.773 
.308 
.556 
.760 
.500 
.465 
.667 
.4.55 
.417 
.348 
.304 
.45S 

46Q 


.690 
.769 
.677 
.556 
.462 
.500 
.259 
.357 
.464 
.571 
..500 
.2.59 

.510 


< 

.800 
.593 
.467 
.462 
.731 
..52-' 
.500 
.556 
.357 
.345 
.600 
.192 

70R 


1 
i 


Boston .... 


571 


Pittsburgh. 


826 


Clevelaud 


680 


Philadelphia 

New York 


.458 
444 




600 


Brooklyn. 


.500 
333 


478 


Baltimore 


458 


Chicao-Q 


500 


636 


St. Louis. 

Louisville 

Washington 


.667 
.333 
.667 

.667 


.406 
.406 
.160 


DiiTerence in Percentajre Points 


666 













It will be seen at a glance that the progress made by the 
Bost07i club from the start to the finish was steadily forward 
up to the middle of September, with one exception, and 
that was in July, when they fell off in their western trip of 
that month. The Pittsburghs alternated each month until 
the last, when they led all the clubs in their September 
percentage. 

The Clevelaiids led off with a spurt, and doing well up 
to August, fell off badly in that month, but managed to be 
third in monthly percentage figures in the lasfmonth of the 
campaign. The Phillies started well and reached high 
percentage figures in June, and then fell off badly. Neuf 
Yo7'fc s progress was up one month and down the next, just 
as they played at home in the east or abroad in the west, 
their best month's percentage being that of August and 
their poorest in May and September. Cincinnati's best 
monthly percentage was that they made in September, their 
lowest being that of June. Brookly?i went up like a rocket 
to July and that month they fell like the stick, their June 
percentage being .657 and that of July .259 only. Balti- 
w^rd' jumped from .357 in July to. 556 — their highest monthly 
percentage — in August, atid then fell of in September. 
Chicago varied each month, just as they faced eastern or 
western teams, they doing nothing against their western 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 93 

companions. They rallied in September and then reached 
their highest monthly percentage. 5^. Lotcis opened with 
a spurt, fell off badly, rallied in July, when they reached 
their best monthly percentage, .571, and ended with .406 
only. Louisville struck a snag at the outset of the race and 
took the leather medal in May with the smallest monthly 
percentage figures of the season, .133. Then they improved 
and reached .500 in July, and ended even with St. Louis in 
September at .406 each. Washingt07i opened quite promis- 
ingly; did well up to July with .458 for that month, and 
then they jumped right into last ditch figures, .160, in Sep- 
tember. The greatest difference in monthly percentage 
figures between the leader and the tail ender occurred in 
August, when the Bostons led the month's percentage rec- 
ord with .800 and Washington with .192, a difference of 708 
points. It will be seen that the pennant race of 1893 was a 
very uneven one. 

THE SEKIES RECORD OF 1893. 

The appended table gives the series of games lost, won 
and tied in the pennant race of 1893, a series being won only 
when a majority of the scheduled games have been won 
after the twelve games have been played, drawn games not 
counting. 

It will be seen that the Boston team won all but one 
series, viz., that with Pittsburgh; the champions did not 
lose a series because that with the Pittsburghs was un- 
finished. 



Series 
Record. 

1893. 



Boston 

Pittsburgh 

Cleveland 5 

Philadelphia 4 

New York 4 

Brooklyn 4 

Ciucitinati 

Baltimore 2 

Chicago 4 

St. Louis I2 10 

Louisville 2 10 

Washington 5 7 



vv L 



9 3 

7 6 
4 8 

8 4 
3 9 

1 11 
3 9 

3 9 

4 8 

2 9 



o 

W L 



W L 



5 7 



O 
W L 



W L 



10 2 

11 1 
4 8 

7 5 

8 4 
2 10 
8 4 



in 

W L 



10 2 
9 3 
9 3 
4 8 
8 4 

8 4 
7 9 

9 3 

3 9 

4 8 
4 8 



o 
W L 



W L 



2 7 5 
4 9 2 

3 11 1 

4 
6 7 
5 



4 8: 



94 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



SUMMARY. 





d 

c 

9 

1 
2 


fci; 

'm 

7 
3 


1 


5 
3 

1 
2 


i 

■| 

6 
3 

1 
1 


4^ 

5 
3 
3 



1 

6 
i 

1 
3 


1 

5 
2 
3 
3 


4 
6 


1 


1 

o 

3 
6 
1 
3 


1 

• 

4 
7 




"> 

•= 

1 

6 
1 
3 


O 

t 


Series woii .... 





Series lost 


11 


Series tied 





Series unfinished 


2 



THE LEAGUE VICTORIES EACH SEASON FR03I 187 G 
TO 1893 INCLUSIVE. 

The appended record presents the respective scores of 
total victories won by each of the clubs belonging to the 
National League from the time of its organization in 1S76 
to the close of the eighteenth year of the League's career, 



in 1892 




















































Cli-bs. 




pi 

1876.. 

1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
1880.. 
1881.. 
1882.. 
1883.. 
1884.. 
1885.. 
1886. . 
1887.. 
1888. . 
1889.. 
1890. . 
1891.. 
1892.. 
1893.. 
Seas" 8 
Play'd 


1 



52 
18 

67 
56 
55 
59 
62 
87 
90 
71 
77 
63 
83 
82 
70 
56 

18 


d 

39 
31 
41 
49 
40 
38 
45 
63 
73 

.1 

61 

70 
83 
76 
87 
102 
86 

18 


a 

1 
> 

38 
55 
52 
47 
52 
58 
84 
53 

8 


1 

41 
42 
40 
28 
41 
87 
79 
68 

8 


d 

i 
44 

24 
45 
45 
52 
64 
38 
56 

8 


1 

24 
47 
36 
42 

55 
35 

ei 

44 

65 
93 
73 

n 


i 

;; 

46 

62 
85 
75 

i^ 

83 
63 
71 
71 
68 

11 


.2 
!c 
p- 

39 
56 
71 
75 
69 
63 

11 


1 

^• 

45 
19 

38 
43 

,'. 

.. 

56 
57 

e 


1 

a 

a 

5. 

9 

37 

38 
21 

.. 

j_ 

77 
56 
82 
65 

8 


i 

i9 

41 
39 
35 

!'. 
4 


i 

9^ 
C 

:: 

40 
32 
18 

3 


i 

26 
46 
48 
41 

[[ 

58 
40 

6 




£ 

24 

:: 
37 
59 
59 

.. 
.. 

4 


1 
47 

24 

;: 
2 



> 

28 

" 

v.. 

63 
50 

4 


i 

" 
•• 
55 
66 
61 
23 
55 
80 
81 


.2 

< 
14 

1 


21 

1 


1 

1 


55 

i 

1 


'5 

03 

a 

sS 
t^ 

29 

;: 
1 


d 
>. 

§ 

m 

86 
61 
95 
65 

4 



S 

1 

46 
60 

2 


CD 

1 

257 
120 
185 
288 
332 
334 
334 
390 
;447 
|444 
448 
521 
541 
518 
530 
545 
903 
773 



It will be seen that the Boston and Chicago clubs are the 
only two clubs which have taken part in all the League 
championship campaigns to date. Cleveland, New York 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



95 



and Philadelphia each playing in eleven seasons; Provi- 
dence, Troy and Buffalo each in eight ; Pittsburgh in seven ; 
St. Louis and Washington in six each; Troy and Indian- 
apolis in four each ; Louisville and Brooklyn in four each ; 
Worcester in three; Hartford in two; and the Athletic, 
Mutual, Syracuse, Milwaukee and Kansas City in one each, 
making twenty-four clubs in all. In the new twelve-Club 
League of 1892 the only club which had not previously 
played in the League campaigns was the Baltimore. 

The appended table shows the winning club of each year 
since professional ball playing was established under the 
auspices of the old National Association of Professional 
Ball Players in 1871, as also the manager of each champion- 
ship club each year: 





Winning Club. 


* Manager. 


m 

3 


> 


S 
g 

1 


•d 

as 
8 


1871 


Athletic, National Association 

Boston, " " 

Boston, " " .... 

Boston, " " 

Boston, " " .... 

Chicago, " League 

Boston, " " 

Boston, " " 

Providence, " " 

Chicago, " " 

Chicago, *' " 

Chicago, " " 

Boston, " " 

Providence, " " 

Chicago, " " 

Chicago, " " 

Detroit, " " 

New York, " " 

New York, " " 

Brooklyn, " " 

Boston, " " 

Boston, " " 

Boston, " " 


Hayhurst 


22 
39 
43 
52 
71 
52 
31 
41 
55 
67 
56 
55 
63 
84 
87 
90 
79 
84 
83 
86 
93 
102 
86 


7 
8 

16 
18 
8 
14 
17 
19 
23 
18 
28 
29 
35 
28 
25 
34 
45 
47 
43 
43 
42 
76 
43 


29 


1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 


H. Wright 

H. Wright 

H.Wright 

H. Wright 

A. G. Spalding 

H. Wright 


47 
59 
70 

79 
66 

48 


1878 


H. Wright 


60 


187P 


G.Wright 


78 


1880 


Anson 


84 


1881 


Anson 


84 


1882 


Anson 


84 


1883 


Morrill 


98 


1884 

1885 


Bancroft 

Anson 


112 


1886 
1887 


Anson 

VVatkins 


124 

194 


1888 


Mutrie 


131 


1889 


Mutrie 


13f 


1890 
18f>1 


McGunnigle 

Selee 


128 
135 


1892 


Selee 


17R 


1893 


Selee 


^9f^i 















It will be seen that Harry Wright is the veteran manager 
of the professional arena, as he was the manager of the 
Boston club from 1871 to 1882 inclusive, and of the Phila- 
delphia club from 1884 to 1894. Anson is next in order. 

THE LEAGUE CHAMPION CI.UBS, 

FROM 1876 TO 1893 INCLUSIVE. 

The list of League champions for the past eighteen years 
of League histor)'-, from the inauguration of the National 
League in 1876 to the close of the second year of the estab- 



96 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



lishment of the reconstructed National League, shows that 
the Boston club has won the pennant six times; the Chicago 
club six times ; the Providence club twice ; the New York 
club twice and the Detroit and Brooklyn clubs once each ; 
while the Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, 
Baltimore. St. Louis, Louisville and Washington clubs of 
the League have yet to win the pennant. But these latter 
eight clubs each propose to be in the van of 1894. There 
is nothing like fighting it out on the persevering line if it 
takes all the summer. Here is the record of the champion 
clubs of the past eighteen years: 



i 


Cl.UH.S. 



^ 

52 
31 
41 

55 
67 

5t 
55 
63 

84 


i 

14 

« 

•23 
17 

28 
•19 

3o 

•28 


J 

a; 

^ 
.648 
.707 
.705 
.798 
.667 
.655 
.643 
.750 


1 t^ 


Ci.uns. 


.1 

111 

8-1 25 
90 34 
79 45 
84147 
83,43 
86:43 
87151 
102 '48 
86:43 


J 


1876 


Chicago 


il885 

11886 
11887 
18»8 
1889 
1890 
1891 


Chicago 


776 


1877 


Boston 


Chicago 

Detroit 

New York 

New York 

Brooklyn 

Boston 


70R 


1878 


Bostou 


637 


1879 


Providence 


641 


1880 


Chicago 


649 


1881 


Cliicago 


667 


188"^ 


Chicago 


630 


1883 
1884 


Bostou 

Providence 


!l892 
1893 


Bo.ston 

Boston 


.680 
66T 











EXTRA INNINGS GAMES. 

The number of extra innings games played in the League 
arena in 1893 were 59. of which 31 were ten innings' games; 
15 occupied eleven innings each, and 8 twelve innings. 
Single games of thirteen, fourteen and fifteen innini:s each 
also being played and two of seventeen innings. Here is 
the record in full : 



Clubs. 


it 

a 

c 



a 
1 

4 

1 
3 

1 

I 




2 

u 


a 

■- 
a 



2 

1 


i 



1 

1 


1 

E 





1 





s 





JL 


& 

1 



1 

2 

i 





1 


i 

i 



? 










1 


a 

1 



1 


ol 



0: 

0, 



1 


New York 


i 

3 

\ 

3 
3 
1 


.31 


9 


Philadelphia 


8 


St. Louis 


R 




6 


Pitts!>urgli 


6 


Cleveland .- 


5 


Brooklyn . 


4 




4 




8 


Boston .... 


?. 


Chicago 


2 


Louisville ... 


2 






Totals 


69 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 97 



THE MANAGERS OF 1893. 



The best company of managers that ever controlled the 
League clubs in a single season were the twelve of 1893. 
There was but one of the twelve who was not, to a more or 
less extent, handicapped by club official interference, and 
that one was Anson, he alone having entire control of his 
team. But only the minority were troubled by official orders 
to any special extent, the instance of the St. Louis club 
being the most prominent. Next to Anson, Ward and Han- 
Ion had the smallest handicap in" this respect, both having 
pretty much their own way. As for Boston, the team virt- 
ually managed itself, from all accounts, just as the old 
Metropolitans did in 1884 when they won the Association 
pennant. Anson, of course, led the kicking of the season, 
though he was less offensive in this respect than usual and. 
not as bad as Ward, Tebeau and Comiskey ; but the whole 
twelve kicked more or less, except the best of the crowd, the 
veteran Harry Wright, who "plays the umpire" better than 
any manager in the business. Ward being the very reverse, 
kicking being his weak point. Comiskey used to be quite 
down to Anson's mark in this deficiency in management and 
captaining ; but he seems to have grown wiser within the 
past year. Nash kicked largely to hide strategic points of 
players' base running. Donovan did it because the " other 
fellows kicked," as did Foutz, and, in fact, the majority. 
Tebeau did it by instinct; Allen kicked against the wishes of 
Harry Wright, and to " please the boss," so it is said. Han- 
Ion kicked more from habit, while Pfeffer did it from early 
teaching in the Ansonian school. Quinn kicked under orders 
from his boss, as an echo from the bench. O'Rourke knew 
better than to go into it deep, but he, too, indulged in the 
folly at times. By and by, in the coming times of a base 
ball millenium, "playing the umpire" will have become part 
and parcel of strategic skill in a captain's work. Here is 
the list of the nominal bosses of the field for 1893 : 

CLUB. MANAGER. CAPTAIN. CAPTAIN'S POSITION. 

Boston Selee Nash Third base. 

Pittsburgh Buckeuberger. .Donovan Right field. 

Cleveland Tebeau Tebeau Third base. 

Philadelphia . . .Harry Wright. .Allen Short stop. 

New York Ward Ward Second base. 

Ciaciunati Comiskey Comiskey First base. 

Brooklyn Foutz Foutz Left field. 

Baltimore Hanlon Hanlon On the bench. 

Chicago Anson Anson First base. 

St. Louis. Watkins Quinn Second base. 

Louisville Barnie Pfeffer Second base. 

Washington.... Wagner O'Rourke ««.Left field. 



98 SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 

THE RECORD OF DRAWN GAMES. 

The drawn games in the championship ^campaign of^iSgS 



,e-re"few and far between, ther_e^ being but a^do^-n in all, 

and six of t 

between New_ vorK anu v^^'-^"^;- .^.-^-^ finished with a 



;'nTsVx of them followed extra innings games 



; York and Cinoi-nnati at the°latter city. June 

.0th, b^ing thi Jading gan. as it^s^_fi^^^^^^^^^^ 

score of 5 to 5 atth?,«"'l°f'fi''tember 13th, between the 
one was that at C"ic'nnat., Septembe^j ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ 



riTCIlEKS. 



DATE. ^'^^"'=- 






Uwver 151 1-1 
• - 3-3 



4-4 



Sept. iSBostouvs 
Sept. 18; Philadelphia V 



s. Chicago at Chicago 



.St. Loui 



sat St. Louis Taylor 



Haldww 7 

A.Clarkson...Meekml2 
iRiisie.. .chamberlaiD 1. ! 5-5 
KUlen.... 
Gumbert. 
Uiastrighl 



. .GermanlO 5-5 



Nicholsi 7: 5-5 

Donnelly 51 T-7 

Hawley 11! 8-8 

Sro«:::::::Mi's!??ii»ii°;S 






2-12 



THE "CHICAGO" 



GAMES OF 1893. 

shut outs. 



white- 



The record of the P™^ ^"^'^X^^ames in which the 
^S^ ,°U'f?^rma=npultn agame-for rS,3 
are shown in the following record^ 




BASE BALL GUIDE. 



99 



Appended is the summary giving the percentage of 
Chicago" victories: 



Pittsburgh . . 
Philadelphia 

New York 

Brooklyn 

Louisville , . . 
Cincinnati . . . 







CO 
















o S 




rA 




n-B 












2 


c3 




03 


> 


^ 


an 


K 


8 


1 


.889 


7 


4 


1 


.800 


8 


6 


4 


.600 


9 


3 


2 


.600 


10 


4 


3 


.511 


11 


4 


4 


.500 


12 



Cli- 



7 St. Louis 

Chicago 

Cleveland.. . 
Washington . 

Boston 

Baltimore . . . 



rr. 
































> 


Q 


3 


4 


4 


7 


2 


4 


2 


ft 


2 


ft 


1 


4 



O 0) 



.429 
.364 



.286 
.200 



It will be seen that the Pittsburgh club bore off the palm 
in " Chicagoing" opposing teams, New York being second 
with Philadelphia, Louisville, Cincinnati and Chicago tied 
for third position in the record of such victories. But in per- 
centage figures, while Pittsburgh stood in the van, the 
Phillies were second, and the Giants third, Baltimore being 
the tail end club in both records. Pittsburgh whipped the 
champions by 8 to o and 13 to o at Pittsburgh on July 7th 
and 8th. 



THK SECTIONAL RECORDS FOR 1893. 

THE EAST vs. WEST SERIES, AND THE HOME-AND-HOME SERIES. 

A feature of the campaign of 1893 was the struggle for 
championship honors as between the clubs of the two sec- 
tions, east vs. west; as also that for the championship of 

East vs. West. 

EASTERN CLUB VICTORIES. 



East vs. West. 



Boston 

New York . . 
Brooklyn ... 
Philadelphia 
Baltimore. .. 
Washington . 

















bc 


c3 

a 




a 




m 


t 


Q 


be 


'ir! 


> 





c 


s 



a 





>• 







_o 


^ 


^ 








J 


m 


r- 


4 


b 


8 


7 


10 


10 


4o 


4 


6 


5 


6 


7 


8 


36 


8 


4 


7 


5 


7 


8 


39 


7 


9 


6 


9 


8 


4 


43 


1 


4 


ft 


8 


5 


9 


32 


2 


1 


3 


4 


4 


4 


18 


26 


20 


34 


39 


41 


43 


213 






.643 
.571 
.557 
.544 
.457 
.257 



LofC. 



lOO 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



each section. Each year is this sectional contest becoming 
more and more interesting; and the time will come when 
the opening months of the championship season each ^-ear 
will be devoted entirely to the series of houie-and-Jiome 
contests for the championship of each section, to be followed, 
in the closing month of the season, by the east vs. luest 
series, instead of mixing the home-and-home series up with 
the sectional contests, east vs. west, as is now the case. 
The summary records of the several campaigns — east vs. 
west and home-and-home games appear on pages 99,100 and 

lOI. 

West \s. East. 



WESTERN CLUB VICTORIES. 



Pittsburgh. 
Cincinnati . 
Chica<ro . . 
Cleveland., 
Louisville., 
St. Louis... 



Defeats. 



WKST vs. EA.ST. 






M ;;| i« S K ii 



2.=>:27 31 36 38 .52 209 



.^ a o 

c o>- 



43 .623 
36 .546 
36 .514 
36 .480 
29 .414 
2't .403 



The following are the respective summary records of the 
home-and-home games of the entire season of the clubs of 
each section. 

EAST vs. WEST. 



j:.\.<t vs. West. 



o 
M 25 



Bo.ston 

New York 4 

Philadelphia 4 

Baltimore 2 

Brooklyn 4 

Washington j 6 



Defeats ! 19 28 30 32 32 37 178 



8 10 
8 
7 

5 

6 

4 



c\^> 



41 1.680 
32. 533 
291.492 
2.S .467 
26 .44S 
22 .373 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



lOI 



WEST VS. WEST. 



AVkot vs. West. 


> 

o 

3 
6 
3 
3 

4 

19 


i 

9 

3 
3 
4 
3 

32 


CS 

a 
a 
o 
id 

"~> 

5 
9 

5 
6 
5 

30 


2 

3 

c« 

9 
9 

7 

4 
3 

32 


6 

> 
.2 

-5 

6 

8 
6 
8 

6 

34 


o 

8 
8 
7 
9 
4 

37 


o 
o 

K- 

37 
3S 
29 
28 
21 
21 

174 


XT. 

I 


Cleveland 


fifil 


Pittsburgh 


633 


Uinciunati .... . . .... 


4991 


St. Louis 


4fi2 


Louisville 


38"^ 


Chicago 


3fi^ 






Defeats 









NEW YORK VS. BROOKLYN. 

—The fifth year in which the representative professional 
teams of New York and Brooklyn have entered the li ts 
against each other for city championship honors, ended 
October i6, 1893, in the success of the Brooklyn team. The 
two rival clubs had lively skirmishes in exhibition games 
together in 1887 and 1888, in which the Brooklyn club had 
rather the best of it, but it was not until 1889 that they 
entered upon a regular scheduled series of games together, 
and at the end of that year, Brooklyn having won the 
American Association Pennant and the New Yorks that of 
the League, the two teams entered the lists together in a 
world's championship series, the record of the series of that 
year being as follows; 



Kew York 


Club. 


Won. Lost. 
6 3 


Played. 
9 
9 

10 
10 

19 
19 

12 
12 

12 

12 


Per cent, of 

Victories. 

.(•-67 


Brooklyn , . . 
Brooklyn . 




3 6 

RECORD FOR 1890. 

6 4 


.333 

.600 


Nfew York. 




4 6 


4U0 


Mew York... 




RECORD FOR 1891, 
11 8 


.579 


Brooklyn 

'few York... 




8 11 

RECCiRD FOR 1S92. 
6 6 


.421 
.500 


Brooklyn . . . 

•few York... 
Brooklyn.... 


:::: 


6 6 

RECORD FOR 1S93. 

6 6 

6 6 


.500 

.500 
.500 



At the close of the championship season of 1893, the two 
teams on their own individual account played a series of six 
scheduled games, which ended in favor of Brooklyn by the 
appended record which appears on page 102. —7 



102 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



Date. 



Winning 
Club. 



CiTi- 



riTCUEKS. 



Score. 



October 7 Xew York . . 

October 10 Brooklyn. . 

October 11 Brooklyn . . 
October 12 Brooklyn . . 

October 14 New York . 

October 16 Brooklyn . . 



New York Rusie 

Brooklyn . 

New York. 
Brooklyn . 

New York. 

Brooklyn . 



j Kennedy 
/ Sliarrott 

Kennedy.. ]»'';?7'n 

Daub Rusie 

. IStein German 

, German ) x. , 

• I Kennedy) "^^^ 

. I Kennedy Petty 



V 12-0 

(lOinninps.) 
5-4 
6-4 
2-0 

5-3 

12-2 - 



Brooklyn scored 28 runs in tUe six games and New York scored 27. 

The Brooklyn club ended its gatnes on September 30th, 
1893, the past season being the club's eleventh since it was 
organized in the spring of 1883. Here is the record from 
1 883 to 1893 inclusive: 



1 


LEAGIE. 


1 

1 
9 
5 
3 
6 
2 

\ 

6 
3 
6 


1 


1 




Mana»;ek. 


1883 
1884 


Inter-Stiite 


04 
20 
o3 
77 
60 
88 
93 
86 
61 
95 
6> 


28 
47 
69 
61 
74 


.611 Tavlor. 
.300 Doyle. 
434 HackKt. 


1885 
188G 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 


American 


American ... 


558 Byrne. 




44s Bvriie. 


American . . 


52 .629 Byrne. 
41 .079 McGunniple. 
43 .667 McGunnigle. 
7C, 445 Ward. 




National L . 




Keorganized 


59 


617 Ward. 


Reor""anized . . ... 


63 


508 Foutz 




762 






Tr 


)tals. 


613 













A RECORD OF FINE FIELDING. 

A record showing the fine fielding of prominent players 
in the League arena in 1893 is appended: 



ri.AYEKS. 


PosmoNS. 


Cixns. 


No. of Succes- 
sive (James 
Without Er- 
rors. 




Pittsburgh 


38 


Thompson Right Field 

Treadway Right Field 

McCarthy Left Field 

Beddey. . . First Rase . 


Philadelphia 


32 


Baltimore 


25 


Boston 


20 


Pittsburgh 


1^ 


D.Lyons 


Third Base 


Pittsburgh 


12 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



103 



Players. 


Positions. 


Clubs. 


No. of Succes- 

'sive Game? 

With but 

One Error. 


Hollidiv 


Centre Field 

Centre Field 

Right Field 

Centre Field 


Cincinnati 


43 


McAleer 


Cleveland : 


34 


Ewino" .. 


Cleveland 


22 


Bradie 


Baltimore 


17 









Plavers. 


^ 

POSITIOXS. 


Cluds. 


No. of Succes- 
sive Games 
With bui 
Two Errors 




Left Field 


Cleveland 


53 


Grilliu . ... 


Centre Field 

Centre Field 

Right Field 

Centre Field 

Left Field 

Left Field 

Right Field 


Brooklyn 


52 




St. Louis 


48 


Treadwciy .... 


Baltimore 


46 


Duffy 


Boston 

Sew York 


45 


Burke 


32 


Foutz 


Brooklyn 


22 




New York 


'20 









EDITORIAIi COMMENT. 

The receipts from college club athletics in 1892, in the one instance of the 
returns 'made to the Faculty of Harvard from the club secretaries of the 
Base Ball, Foot Ball, Rowing, Athletic, Tennis, Cricket and Cycling associa- 
tions of the University, sliowsthat in 1892 all previous records of the kind 
were beaten. Here is the receipt statement for the year : 

TIARVARD RKCEIPTS, 1892. 

Base ball $20,239 

Foot ball 17,802 

Rowing 7.415 

Athletics 5 048 

Teunis 1,058 

Cricket 681 

Cycling 367 

Total receipts from all games $52,210 

That the expenses should run up to thelarge total of $44,680 is surprising, 
those of the base ball club reaching $18,840, and of foot ball ^11,467 alone. 

Manager Anson declared his faith In the permanancy of the League's 
tenure of life very practically in the spring of 1893, by pLtcingliis signature 
to a five years'' contract as manager oi the League club of Chicag- >. Anson 
knows what he is about. Though noted as a "•kicker," he liardly ever 
finds occasion to kick himself for any error of judgment in his business 
atfairs. 

The Cincinnati Enquirer says : "The Cincinnati Club Is run on a differ- 
ent plan from all the other clubs in the National League and American 
Association, It is conducted more like a theatrical enterprise, Capt. 
Comiskey hlling the position of stage manager, having entire control of that 
department, engaging his own people and giving the show, whilo Bancroft 
looks after the front of the house, taking charge of tickets and the money, 



I04 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

and arranginf? dates and board and car rates. The two departments are so 
foreign to eacti otlier that there is no conflict between tlieui. Several otlier 
clubs would do well to pattern atter the Cincinnatis iu this direction.'" 

One of tlie absurd bloils made by a minority of the star players of 1893, 
when the cut, rates in salaries wore introduced,wastliat(if their threatening 
to leave the base ball arena and to go into business if their demand for high 
salaries was not agreed to. When it is considered that the "cut rates'' in 
question admitted of salaries of from seventy-Jive to one hundred dollars 
a week for the player's services, according to his ability to till the special 
bill, the threat of " going into business'' became a gross aitsurdity. What 
star player was there in the raniis of the twelve League clubs, iu either 1892 
or 1893, wUo was competent to earn fifty dollars a week in any ordinary 
business vocation? In fact, the majority of the players could not liave 
earned even twenty-five dollars a week in any business situation to save 
their lives. Look at the fools who, by sacrificing themselves at the altar of 
Bacchus, have forfeited their chance to earn salaries as ball players, and 
who are glad even to earn a dollar a day for ten hours of hard labor. 

The opening week's play at the Polo Grounds, New York, In 1893, was the 
most successful known to the New York club since the spring of 1888. Tlie 
aggregate attendance at the three college games played on March 30, 31 and 
April 1, was nearly seven thousand people, and, moreover, the character of 
the attendance was such as to prove conclusively that tlie old time cranks 
had returned to tlieir allegiance. Thougli the opening game was marked by 
very unpropitiovis weather, tlie attendance was such as to astonish the local 
magnates, it being the largest seen on such an occasion during the past 
five years. 

Mr. Richter, in commenting in the Sporting Life on the adventof "colt" 
players in minor League teams, had this to say on the subject: 

"The thousands of candidates who play ball in minor Leagues and work 
at odd jobs in the winter time, looking to one day blossoming as star play- 
ers in a major League, are usually a queer class of boys. Most of the men 
now playing ball with the Twelve-Club League had no idea of playing ball 
professionally whentliey startedout ; but they were better than their fellow- 
players and commenced to play occasional games for money until they 
attracted tlic attention of a professional managei'. It does not cost much 
to employ a young player for a minor League ti-am, and he takes the chance 
of not getting his salary. Still his name getsiuto the papers and the major 
League managers and magnates in these sections are always watching for 
a youngster who looks as though he would develop. Hardly one man in 
teh who are tried come up to the standard, but the one man so obtained is 
worth ten old timers, who have grown old and still" drawing big salaries 
and helping to reduce the stock of booze." 

The best indoor exercise for base ball players is hand ball, which develops 
those qualities most essential to the ball player— alertness, agility and an 
even development of muscle. The fact that both Sullivan and Corbett, when 
getting in condition for their famous fight, played hand ball, is a testimo- 
nial to its worth as a means of training. 

In regard to the alleged breaking up of the new Twelve-Club League 
after this year,whicli some of the old mischief-making class of scribes 
apparently desire to see, it is worth while to note the words of article 3 of 
the Li-ague Constitution, which states that "This League shall consist of 
twelve clul>s — the members of which shall not be increased or dirninished 
for a period of ten years.'^ It requires a uuanimous vole to change the 
law. 

The Twelve-Club is here to stay for a decade sure, and each year will only 
add to its value as the model professional organization of the period. 

A writer, who has closely observed professional base ball players, says 
that 

•' Base ball players as a rule never make good business men. In the first 



r.ASE BALL GUIDE. I05 

place most of tliem begin playing ball young— before they have had any 
opportunity to leani commercial ways and means— very suddenly jump 
from a state of no income whatever into the possession of salaries equal to 
those which are drawn by judges or earned by bank ollicials. Like all men 
who fall into fortunes, or who suddenly find themselves in possession of a 
great deal of money, these ball players show that they have no idea of 
money's woith. It comes easy and it goes easy. 

"■ He enters the profession without any education in lousiness ways, and 
once he has tasted of the luxuries and extravagances of a base ball life he 
can never afterward bring himself to a tie down to the exactions of an 
instruction in business at a moderate salary. The l:izy, idle life he leads as 
a professional, as well as the possession of immense salaries, wholly dis- 
arms him for the real ))attle of life, which so often comes after his brief 
meteoric fame on the ball field has flashed and died awav. 

" Another reason why so few ex-ball players ever make themselves felt 
in business circles is the lamentable fact that the vast majority are poorly 
educated and are wholly unfit for positions which require any reasonable 
amount of trained intelligence. For this reason probably eighty per cent. 
of all ball players who ' go into business' do it .by opening a saloon or by 
putting money in that particular field, with a belief that their supposed 
great popularity will draw thema fortune-making patronage." 

Z Since Dick Higham was expelled for crooked umpiring, not a man has 
been found to possess the bold etttontery to render crooked decisions. They 
may have acted partially in tlieir renderings at times, but this has mainly 
been the result of quick temper, or of the irritating annoyances from con- 
tinued "kicking." One obstacle in the way of an umpire's doing his work 
successfullyis the habit of being on too familiar terms with players. In 
this respect the old saying tliat "familiarity breeds contempt" comes into 
play with considerable effect. An umpire who desires to earn a prestige of 
success in his position should do nothing to lessen the respect so necessary 
for him to have at the hands of players. This is half the battle in umpiring. 
Many an umpire, who has shown good judgment and thorough i.npartiality 
in rendering liis decisions, has offset the advantages these requisites of good 
umpiring gave him by ways in his dealings with players which have either 
lowered him in their respect or destroyed his prestige as a competent judge. "^ 

Itls well known that each season's experience in League club manage- 
ment involves a certain amount of experiment in the organization of the 
several club teams; especially is this the case in the formationof a club's 
batteries; and the League season of 1893 was no exception to the lule. 
Indeed, rather more of the experimental work, in the make up of the 
several cluljs pitching departments, was done in 1893 than for some years 
past. This experimental business in selecting pitchers was especially 
over-done by the Baltimore, Cincinnati, Washington and St. Louis clubs, 
and one result was their occupation of second division places. 

A few clubs, each season, go to the other extreme and adopt a false 
economy in the make up 01 their batteries, only a minority each year 
striking the happy medium. 

No club needs over four pitchers and three catchers at the utmost. In 
fact, three pitchers and two catchers ought to suffice. 

The board of directors of the National League, in interpreting the League 
contract with its clubs' players, has these important words to say, which 
all the club players would do well to read attentively: 

"Experience has amply demonstrated the necessity for some plan of 
disciplme that will reach the pocket as well as the pride of the player who 
deliberately and systematically falls short of the honorable discharge of 
his obligations toward the club and the patrons of base ball. The compen- 
sation paid to players in League clubs is so liberal as to enlitle the clubs to 
the highest degree of skill and the best service a player can render, and it 
is the intention of the League to exact precisely this and nothing less. 



io6 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



There is not a condition or penalty prescribed in the League contract, con- 
stitution or playtujr rules that will work a hardship to any conscientious, 
earnest, deserving; player. It is only players of the opposite character who 
will sutler, and it is their turn to suiler. The clubs have had more Uian 
their share of the pecuniary loss, tlie agtrravat ion, annoyance and mortifi- 
cation caused by the state of allairs which these conditions and penalties 
have been devised to correct. Justice to tlie players is a demand and 
obligation at all times recognized; justice to the club managers and stock- 
holders, who have made good the deiuiencies in the club treasuries, seasoB 
after season; justice to the public, upon whose respect and patnuiage the 
clubs must depend for an existence; justice to thenobie game of i)ase ball, 
which it has l)een the constant aim of the League to elevate, perfect and 
poDularize— these, and these alone, are the considerations which have influ- 
enced and bniught about the League's latest legislation on the subject of 
discipline and penalties.'' 

Touching the subject of the opinion of ball players on changing the rules, 
Mr. Kichter, in an ai)le editorial in the Spordiif/ Life, in Mar-li, 18y3, says: 
"It has been demonstrated but recently that the average ball player has 
not sense enougli to realize the situation of the national game or interpret 
the signs of the times; that he is selfish enough to kick against salary 
reduction in the face of the general depression and loss, and foolish 
enough to talk of combines in spite of his disastrous experience with 
combines and itrotherhoods in the past. And yet the average ballplayer 
is hekl by some magnates and many hero worshipiner journijlists, who hold 
that the'base ball sun rises and sets in the popular idols of tlie day, as 
sensible enough and broad enough to formulate opinions on important 
rule changes. And, furthermore, they seem to consider the opinion of 
these light waisted players as entitled, not only to respectful consideration, 
but to precedence over the opinions and theories of those wlio work for, 
think of and study more ai)out the game in a day, for the love of it, than 
does the average player who thinks only of the income to be derived from 
it, in a year." 

THE KICKING NUISANCE. 

It was fully anticipated by President Young that the stringent rules gov- 
erning umpiring for 1893 would have eliminated the evil of "kicking"' 
from the past season's campaign, bat the moral cowardice of the majority 
of the L«'ague statrof umpires, as shown in their failure to enforce the 
legal penalties for the violation of the rules in disputing umpires' decisions. 
led to the continuance of the old aiuise, and to such an extent tliat Presi- 
dent Young had to issue a special edict to hissraifof umpires to .strictly 
enforce the rules against Kicking during the latter part of the campaign, 
or else risk thelossof theirpositions. 

The disputing of decisions rendered by umpires, in which only errors of 
judgment are involved, is folly in the extreme, as a matter of policy, aside 
from the fact that it is in direct violation of the primed rules of the game. 
No such decision can be reversed, to begin wilh:of what use, then, is it to 
dispute themy Moreover, whenever a captain of a team dis]mies such 
decisions, he virtually charges the umpire with being either lacking in 
integrity or in judgment, and wliat umpire, no matter how impartial he 
may desire to l)e, is going to decide a doubtful point in favor of the cap- 
tain who charges him with dishonesty or stupidity? It is not in human 
nature for any umpire to do it. The'kicker, therefore, loses a point every 
time he kicks, and there is no possibility of his gaining a point by kicking. 

There are constantly occurring in every game points ot play in which a 
doubt is involved as to whether a player is out or not in base running, and 
also as to whethera ball is pitchcdover the phite and within the legal range 
or Bot; and the rules making the umpire "the sole judge of play in the 
game " leave it optional with him to decide the doubt in favor of one side 
or the other. Just here comes into play the shrewd point of silent acquie- 



BASE BALL GUIDE, I07 

scence in decisions, for the player or captain who does this is bound to have 
the doubt given in his favor as against the player or captain who indulges 
his bad temper by kicking. 

Wlienever you see a player or a captain who has made misplays and wants 
to throw the onus of it on the umpire you will find your stupid, short- 
sighted kicker at work, sure. Some of these days, when the game gets out 
of the ruts of one kind or another it now wallows in, we will see the folly of 
kicking done away with. 

Captains of professional teams have been disputing decisions, which 
cannot possibly be reversed, for so long a time that it has become a sort of 
second nature to them. The prevailing idea among the general class of 
base ball captains has been for years that unless they kick against the 
umpire's decisions they fail to do their duty. A greater mistake of judg- 
ment was never committed. Thereis a sound policy involved in refraining 
from kicking, and in silently acquiescing in the umpire's decisions on 
called balls and str-ikesand in points of play in base running, a point which 
a little consideration would show any thoroughly competent captain very 
plainly how greatly he errs in kicking. 

NOTEWORTHY INCIDENTS OF 1893. 

The Sporting Life of November 25th, 1893, had this paragraph in its 
report of the League Convention: 

A TRIBLTE TO CHADWICK. 

" Mr. Byrne reported that the veteran Henry Chadwick, the only Journalist 
living who has been reporting base ball since the game was lirst played, 
away back in the forties, was lying seriously and dangerously ill at his 
home in Brooklyn. In recognition of Mr, Chadwick's years of hard work 
in the interest of the sport, the League adopted the following resolutions 
of sympathy for the artlicted gentleman: 

" llesolved. That this body^learns with regret that Mr. Henry Chadwick, 
who, smce the organization of professional base ball in this country, has 
been a champion of honest, upright and inauly methods in playing the 
game, and has done much to enable the national game to reach its present 
high standard, has been for some time and is now seriously ill. We desire 
to say that this body hereby extends to Mr. Chadwick its sincere sympathy 
in his aftliction, and while regretting his absence from our annual meeting, 
hope and trust he will be blest with early convalescence." 

The meeting was finally adjourned, to meet again in New York, February 
26th, 1894. 

In the second innings of the game between the Boston and Cleveland 
teams, July r2th, at Cleveland, Tucker blocked Zimmer in an attempt to 
catch the latter napping at first base. Zimmer was obliged to leave the 
game, and it was found tiiat a bone in his shoulder was broken. The spec- 
tators were very indignant, and hooted and jeered at Tucker. O'Connor 
caused a disturbance in the third innings of this game by calling foul on a 
ball he hit to Nash, when men were on first and second ba.ses. When Nash 
heard O'Connor cry "foul" he tiiought it was Umpire Gatl'ney, and did not 
field the ball at all, but looked at Gaffney. When he found out that it was 
not Gaifney that called, Nash touched third and threw to first. Tucker 
threw to Lowe, running Ewing down, and a triple play was the result. 
Umpire Gaffney at first aUowed a double play; then Nash came in and 
argued with him, and he allowed a triple play. Tebeau next made his 
appearance, and after more talk Gaffney allowed only two outs, claiming 
he did not see Lowe touch Ewing. Then Gaffney sent Ewing back tosecond, 
and there was moi'C delay, for Ewing had not readied second, having been 
put out returning to first. Ewing went back to second, and Nash finished 
the innings by a great play, retiring Oilman from a throw back of the base. 

"What might have resulted in a shocking accident was happily averted," 
July 13th, at Troy, N. Y., says the Troy Telegram, adding "but those who 



^°^ Spalding's official 

witnessed the narrow escape from death of a carriage full of in^o h-.ii 
players the meml>ers of the Butial.i team, underwent af awful strain for a 
monieutorso The carriage was loaded 'with passenJeVraf^er tlfe Vame 
n.^i''?^,''" ^''^ ^'■^^''•' j"-^^ •'^•^"''1 «f I'le depot atNVest-n-ov TheS 
?r^Tli^^''-l'^ 7''^ V"^ scramble on the part of the ball players to e^JaS 
f^rrn i"" ''^'^'f '^' V""^ ^i^^ spectators held their breath in ant ci pat ion o^^ 
^rnble catastrophe. The Saratoga "ilyer" was bearing close unonthl 
TorfZ^'lVl' ,^""l"^rJ"oment would have crashed YmZ tl e IhoPoiVhlj 
terrified loacl of passengers. Three of the ball players who were standing 
in tlie rear of the vehicle, jumped for their lives^hile ti e othSexoec ed 
every second to be dashed to thrir deaths. The driver whinnldUDlS 
lorses and landed his precious load on the other side of th?trSiustM 
Sarvel^'usoiie"'^''''' '''''''''' ""' ^^ ^^^^ ^^ spare." iSe escape'was^ 

tb^,^"n ^^"5^^?.'^^^P* through Alexandria, Ind., August 19th and struck 
ind .te^'ir"^ interrupted a game that was to be contes ed bv KnSS 
^r?„H -^ ''^''^ ^""'^- ^"'^'"^ ^"■•' hundred people had gathered In the 
grand stand and were seeking shelter from the niin, when the wind tore 
the tniilding to pieces and carried the top a hundred vS T e neo^^ 
went wdd with excitement, and men, women and children tram nk^d each 
other making good their escape. Wmps, umbrellas, band ho?ns sea t^nS 
and o her articles were scattered in all directions. While no one was k led! 

fna%'i^r^s\1i!iy^^^^^^^^^^ 

London then defeating the St. Augustine nine'of DarSnIn a^.^^^^^^ 
33 to 6. The contest was the deciding one for a fifty guinea cup and the 
base ball championship of England. The Thespian lean "l ich "o s^ ed 
largely of American music hall and variety artists, included l' ra t Xh?r- 
Halter catcher; Hurley, Elton and Wilson on the I ases; ita.kweath^^^ 
short stop, and Kuu wles, Athol and March in the outfield *^" tamer, 

Unh-f'ix.fv "nof/ ^n^ ^'V '''^ Philadelphia, between the Phillies and the Pa. 
?ho\vpi /if.f ir^!..^r.f''''""''f P'''^. "<'^->irred in the third innings, which 
snouedtliatArtliurliwm has not forgotten the tricks which he learned 
wlule on the Philadelphia club in the eighties. It was Fields' tim, t! leS 
h^n^' ''f n""'^r^-^' ""' ""'"'^ '''''''' '"••■^^'to »>at. He was given hstseJn 
en ?e Side waVoirr^'otif"^^'?"..^ ''^' ^'^^'^^ ""^ IrwiiUnsisted that the 
entie side was out. As Reiliy and i^harrott were also ahead of Fields on the 
batting list the three men were declared out. 

T R^^"^^ ^^'® ^"^"^ betwen the St. Louis and Boston teams July 1st at St 
Louis, two men were thrown out at the home plate on one plav There was 
a man on tinrd and one on second when a i\v ball was h t to the mmiSd 
Tiiemanontiiirddidnotrun home, afraid le.^t the ball nig ,t be cauSr 
but he man on second saw that it would not be caugiit, a d ra to t lifid.' 
iaii wJi^'i'i^'^fl'^ r'^^."^ both runners started for lionie, wlu^eupo he 
being coSedoi?. '''*-' P'''^^' '^''^ ^*^"^ ^^^^ ^^^"S then and there ?etired^ 

hpTvv^ ^!"?h ^^^^' ^""'""^ P^atch of the season was that plaved on March 28tii 
between the Pennsylvania University and Swarthniore c6llege nine FortF- 
six hits for a total of seventy-nine bases was the batting rrnVrlmad^by 
?rfr^T.7f' Tfe game was played under the old ru.el, so t cannot bj 
attn!)uted to any change in pitching distance. The score- 

swarthniore 10 0-1 

University of Pennsylvania 12 8 4 1 12 3 4 10 5-59 

An amusing contest took place July f.ih, at West Chester. Pa. One team 
Z'!uJTf^?J^ ""^ men weighing trom 200 to 395 pounds and the other of meu 
none of whom weighed more than 120. In the game were a number of 
prominent business men, councilmen, county officials and professional men. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. I09 

ThP fat mon won the came by a score of 22 to 15. All were dressed in ridic- 
ufoVs SmTaud I'ew SinJnons, of HuladelpMa umpired. Tlie proceeds 
of the game ^vere given to the Chesier County Hospital. 

Seven old captains of teams took part in a game at Eastern Park between 
tJie Brook yn ami Louisville teams iu Juue, 1893. First there were Captains 
FomzJndSeirerof the opposing teams; then Captain Richardson of the 
wTshingtons of^92 followed by Captain Bu.us of ^I'e old Ba Itimores of the 
Si^s- next Captain Stovey of the old Athletics, with Captain Brown of 
SfolT PmsburXsof the elrly eighties, and, lastly, the Umpire Captain 
Snyder of the old Cincinnatis of the early eighties. 

A trinle play was made during the game between the Holyoke and North- 

anrnton teams July 1st, at Holyoke, Mass. In the fourth mnings, with 

• K?k on second and Carr on first, Egan knocked a high fly to he infield 

K^LhandBurnsst.medforit,anditfeU 



Srcke up toucl rsrcondTr can-, threw to third ciUting 

McGuirk aud-then Garland threw to first, shutting out Egan, who was 
watching the play without attempting to run. 

A curious coincidence of the three championship games of the New 
Fn-lindLS4e played June 7th, was that iu each it required ten innings 
t^Sedde'^tht^ues^tirof victory.At Fall River and Jo ver the Portland and 
Lewiston teanis won by the respective f ores of 4 to 3 and 5 to 4. At 
Towell however, the home team proved victorious by 11 to J o^erine 
Kton club; Whitney winning the game by bringing in two men after 
two were out in the tenth innings. ,ut^ /i.» 

The best record of victories pitched in in 1893 goes to the credit of })oa 
Cilrke of the Erie club of the Eastern League. But Clarke's record docs 
nSeaA?l that made by George Hodson, of the Jamestown club of the New 
York\ndPennTylvLiiLeag^^^^ in 51 victories out of 

67 'amet 22 ofTe victories bei in consecutive order. This is the record 
thifs far in the number of victories pitched in in any one season. 

The Cleveland Leader says that ''there is one rule that is constantly dis- 
obT^od by uSres and thit is that which says the base runner shall have 
?hP hPTiptit of the doubt when the ball and the runner appear to get to the 
base at thrsimrttoe: Every club in the League with fast left-handed 
hatters was handicapped by this disobedience of a plain rule.'. The rule in 
SuestS^realJ appeSs only on first base, but it should be applicable to all 
the bases. . ^^ ,, 

Thp crack nitcher of Yale College nine, Carter— the best in the college 
areni ?n 1893-gave a surprising exhibition of his prowess at New Haven, 
oSy 2d, when he shut out tlieVack Brown nine Not until one man was 
niiMn the ast iunin<rs did a single batsman reach first base. Then Gillon 
eot tSe only Biwn sinSle of the\rame. Carter struck out 18 and either put 
S or assisted out 24 of the 27 opposingbatsmen. The score was 7 to 0. 

ThP Cincinnati team, from July 4th to July 10th, played five successive 
champiSTgamcs which were so closely contested that there was a dif- 
ferSof only one run at the finish of each, two bemg lost with the PhUa- 
delnhSs while the last three games-two with the Brooklyns a;id one with 
?h1 BamnTores-were each unexpectedly won by a lucky streak of batting 
in the last half of the ninth innings. 

In thp ffame between the Baltimore and Louisville clubs, June 6tn at 
Bam norc J^uniugl luade a remarkable play in the fifth innings, when 
Mcrriw waron^^^^^ Robinson hit directly over second base and 

Wiin^sSed forward, fell upon the ball and threw it, while lymg on the 
STd^ to Pfeffer^in time to retire McGraw, who was runnmg to second. 
The ninth innings cut alarge figure in several championship games of the 
' National Lea^^ue and Amev can Association on July 6th. In it Louisyiue 
made the four runs that tied New York, Cincinnati made three runs that 
K Biookl?n Pmsburgh scored five runs that downed Boston, and Phila- 

SefphirnSe one un tifat forced Chicago to play eleven innings to win. 



iio Spalding's official 

Decoration Day was a red-letter occasion in every citv, and 106 000 Deonle 
turned out to show that they had not forgotten how to shout. InThiladel 
phia3,i00people were present in the morning, and 10,860 people in the 
afternoon. As it was ladies' day, too, fully 600 more got in on compliment- 
ary tickets, so that the attendance for the day footed up a total of l5,i:o. 
•.c?o"^^?l'^?"' ^'\® ^^"^^^^ pitcher of the Chicago club, holds one record for 
i;,f ;Hi^f K^ ^".^^ twenty-mne men face him in the game in which he shut 
out the Boston team, July 3d, at Chicago. Two hits were made off him but 
one of the men was put out at second trying to make a single hit a double 
and the only other man to reach lirst got there on called bails. 

,.?I?^''^I^^*'^S^V^^^ played by the Baltimore team at Chicago, Julv 13th 
14lh and 15th, the visitors scored only six nms. Two runs out Jf four 
scored in two games were made by Kelley, and the two in the second game 
were credited to Long. In these three games the Baltimores scored the 
following sequence of runs, 3, 2 and 1. owicu luc 

At Macon, Ga., on July 30th, Twitchell made the longest throw on record 
-135 yards 2 inches. The throw was made in the presence of 1,000 persons 
including Manager Barme, of the Louisville club; Manager Schmelz of 
Chattanooga: Beard, of Macon, and Umpire Serad. The throw was meas- 
ured with a tape line by Serad. 

It required thirteen innings to decide the game between the Danville and 
Berwick teams, July 15th, at Berwick, Pa., the former then winniu«r l)v a 
score of 3 to 2 A curious feature of the contest was, that the winners made 
only two safe hits olf ^ eiTick, while the losers made six hits olT Meyer. 

In the fourteen innings championship game between the Washlnsron 
and .St, Louis teams, August 2Sth, at AVashington, Frank, of the visitors 
made live safe hits, including a double bagger, and yet scored only one run' 
while \\ ise, of the home team, made two runs off a solitary single. 

One of the greatest crowds ever assembled at a Cincinnati base hall park 
were pruscnt at the Cincinnati-Louisville game. There were several hun- 
dred excursionists from Louisville among the 12.360 persons who iammed 
the stands and occupied every available bit of room on the field. 

Here's an odd state of affairs: Cleveland wins nine out of twelve "-amea 
from iMttsbnrgh, Pittsburgh takes eleven out of twelve from Baltimore and 
Baltimore wins eight out of twelve from Cleveland. 

NOTEWORTHY PROFESSIONAL CONTESTS OF 1893. 

The first games of the season, P:ast vs. West, plaved on western ball fields 
on June 26th, resulted in three victories for the east to two for the west 
the Hoston, riuladelplua and Brooklyn teams winning, respectlvelv in 
Louisville, Pittsljurgh and Chicago, while the hew Yorkers played a grand 
game at Cincinnati, the two eastern teams which lost being the Baltimores 
at St. l>ouis and the Washingtons at Cleveland. 

At Cincinnati the record of the League season was liroken in the wav of 
extra innings games, as seventeen innings had to be plaved before 'the 
game was ended, and then neither side scored a victory, darkue-^s ending 
the game after nearly three hours' play had occurred. The home team took 
what was tliought to be a winning lead at the start, the filth innings ending 
with the score at 3 to o in Cincinnati's favor. In the sixth innin-sthe visi- 
tors scored their first run in the game, and in the ninth they tied'the score 
3to3. In the thirteenth innings each added a single to their score asalso 
in the sixteenth.'and when the seventeenth innings had ended the scoreslood 
at 5 to 5 and Umpire Emslie called the game. The excitement after the 
ninth inniugs was intense. Here is the score of this remarkable contest- 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Ill 



CiNCIKNATI. 



F. WardjT.f 

Latham, 31) 

McPhee,2b 

Holliday, c.f 

Canavan, l.f 

Comiskcy, lb.... 

Smith, s.s 

Sullivan, p 

Chamberlain, p 

Murphy, c 

Vaughn, c 



Totals. , 



13 5123 



New Yokk. 



Burke, If... 
J. Ward, 2b. 
Tiernan, r.t 
Connor, lb. 
Davis, 3b . . . 
Milligan, c . 

Rusie, p 

Lyons, c.f .. 
Fuller, s.s.. 



Totals 



^ 


IB 


PO 


A 










— 





1 


1 





1 


3 


6 


7 








4 


1 


1 


2 


24 











2 


4 


2 


4 


10 


5 


1 


3 





4 





2 


3 








1 


1 


9 


5 


16 


51 


30 



SCORE BY INNIN<JS. 

11100000000 
00001002000 








1 0—5 
1 0-5 



Cincinnati 

New York 

Earned runs-Ctacinnat, 2^^^^ 

The contest at Philadelphia on June 1st, which was witnessed by '7,417 
people proved to be the most exciting game of the season in he Quaker 
ruv no less than fourteen innings having to be played before the contest 
pSd The visitors led by 4 to 1 at the end of the fourth innings af er 
Slith'thePhnUes rallied and tied the score in the eighth innings, and a ter 
£t neither sde?ouid add to their score until the fourteenth mnings, when 
fhe home team got in two runs, and then, blanking their opponents, camem 
l^cto?s by 6 t?4 A peculiar play kept the Baltimore^ from winning in the 
nSth innings The bases were tilled in this innings,with two nien out, when 
ppitl drove the bal at Allen. The latter could not get down to the ball m 
5m? RmHt Xiced off his leg into the air and over second base. Hallman, 
Sg?heolpoSi?y r^^^^^ for the ball, caught it and jumped for the 

„• J +i,o«- i<r%no nf Viic pnirlips was one of the iiuest tnat nas ever uceu bt^tu 
?n?heocaf Sound and had iT^^^^ from him there w;ould have been 

a^iiffprent stlrrto tell Tread way had been doing some tall hitting all day 
lndS?4as%cli uneasiness as he stepped to the plate. He picked out 
J bal i St^Sited to his fancy and drove it for the sign alongside of the 
tcorelSd Hamilton sprinted for the bicycle track and fPrang in the air 
iiiStls the ball was sailing over his head. It was rather dark at this time 
Ind, stafdinf inthe shalow of the fence no -^.th-f Vl.Vfthl'crowd 
thp hflll until he was seen waving his left hand in tne air. iiieu uic ^'"Jw^ 
broke SandThe little fielder was cheered to the echo. Hamilton a so 
made a clever catch by backing against the centre field fence and captui- 
Sg Reitz's fly Sll in the same innings." Here is the score: 



112 



Spalding's official 



PlIILADELPniA. 



Baltimore. 



Hallman, 2b... i o 

Boyle, lb ■.■.■."' o 

€lements, c [ 1 

Cross, 31) '.'.'.'.'.'.\ 1 

Allen, s.s .'.*.'.." 

Carst'v, p .!!!.'. 1 



l! 4 10 
21 
2 

2 

3 



!_?L»I 



SSr-'-,!' iiil^'^o'^!^!^ 

1 j Tread way, 
|McGraw,'s.! 
Reitz, 2b. . 

IBaker, l.f i q ii qi „ 

3|Robinson.c ."l o| ol 5 S 

Hawke.p io i 1 I 



HO A E 



3 2 4! 

2 4 0| 

0,21 1 l' 

1 41 O' 

0| i: 4 1 



Totals. 



4 10 42 



riiiladelpliia 1 q 

Baltimore 1 o 



2 10 2-6 
2100000000 
Earned runs-Pliiladelpliia, 3; Baltimore 2 Total h-i^ 



0—4 



15; Baltimore, 12. Sacriilce iiils-DelahanVv^o- 'R?^ip'''nTrM?"*'^'^r^^P'''^' 
Robinson Bases stolen-Hamilton, S rr >^^beiaK^ 2- Kl mi'l. ^?;'"''' 
on bilIs--Sliarrott, Hamilton, Baker Rol.inson Trt^t !^%V ^/ "^ ^^ses 

^..^IlallmdnandCross^K^^Ua^^^^^^^^ 

THE COLLEGE CLUB ARENA. 

SPECIAL NOTICE TO COLLEGE CLUBS. 

It was the intention of the editor of the Guide to have 
given the statistics of the College season of 1893 in fu fin 
the Guide for 1S94, but he has had so few replies tJ) h k 
request for College club records, which requestCas made 
last Fall through the columns of the sporting papers a. well 
as through the pages of last year's Guide ise?f that the 
chapter of club statistics is necessarily incomplete One 
would naturally suppose that the most complete an^lVsiV of 
a past season's work on the field would emanate from the 
College clubs; but it is quite the reverse, the coll^eia e 
scorers or secretaries, as a rule, being apparentlv contend 
with giving out the most meagre array of fiicures and the 
most incomplete of College nin^ records ^'''^^^' "^""'^ "^® 
What we ^vant in the future from the College club secre- 
taries and othcial scorers of all college clubs desirous of 
having their season's statistics in Spalding's Base Ball 
Guide of each year, is as follows: 

com^fs in ?bi:form "' ''' «""^^ "'^^^^ '° championship 

May 6-IIarvanl vs. Princeton, at Princeton; pitchers, Wiggln.sand 
May 20-Yalc;s.PrinceVon,aiNewihueu^'pitchVrs;CaH^ ^ 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



113 



May 30— Harvard vs. Princeton, at Cambridge; pitcliers, Wiggins and 

Dralse 2-0 

June 10— Yale vs. Princeton, at Princeton; pitchers, Carier and Drake 9-8 

June 17— Yale vs. Princeton, at tlie Polo Grounds; pitcliers. Carter, 

Davis and Drake 14-7 

June 24— Harvard vs. Yale, at Cambridge; pitcliers, J. Highlands and 

Carter (10 innings^ 3-2 

June 27— Yale vs. Harvard, at New Haven; pitchers. Carter and High- 
lands 3-0 

July 1— Harvard vs. Yale, at the Polo Grouuds; pitchers, Highlands 

and Carter 6-4 

Second, the club averages giving only the name of the 
batsmen and fielders with their positions, and the base hit 
and fielding averages of each. 

Third, the record of the championship games showing 
total victories and defeats in order of percentage of vic- 
tories as follows : 

OS 



RECOKD of 1893. 



Harvard. . 

Yale 

Princeton. 



Defeats 









1 

■ 



























33 














i- 





fl 













B 


>H 


Oh 


'r^ 




2 


2 


4 


1 




3 


4 



















— 


— 


1 


2 


5 


1 8 



800 
571 



All pitching records sent should include games won and 
lost together with total wild pitches and called balls. 
The average should include only the percentage of base hits 
and of fielding. 

THE COI.JLEGE CLUB SEASON OF 1893. 

FALL RECORDS OF THE LEADING CONTESTS OF THE SEASON. 

Experience, during the past three years, has very plainly 
shown that the professional revolt and revolution of the 
nineties had a vronderful effect in increasing the patronage 
given the leading College club matches of each season smce 
iSgo. The attendance at the Harvard, Yale and Princeton 
matches, of 1892 surpassed all previous records in College 
club history, while that of 1S93, was nearly up to that of 
1892. One result was, of course, large additions to the 
athletic funds of each college, that of Harvard alone reach- 
ing in 1892 the large sum of ^50,000, of which the base ball 
contributions were nearly half, while Yale's returns in base 
ball alone reached $20,000 in 1892. The fact is, there is a 
vim and an earnestness to win for the honor of victory 
alone, in most of the College club contests, which is not 
always seen on the professional fields ; and this makes the 



114 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



championship games in the College arena specially attract- 
ive to those who are enthusiastic votaries of base ball. 

More important games were played in the College club 
arena in 1893 than ever before in the history of collegiate 
base ball. We kept a record of the most prominent games 
of the college season from March to July inclusive in which 
the nines of Harvard, Yale and Princeton universities took 
part, and this record is appended. 

Here is the record of the games in which the Harvard, 
Yale and Princeton nines took part during the months of 
March, April, May, June and July in 1893. 

MARCH AND APRIL GAMES. 



DATE. 



M'hSO Pa. University vs. Yale 

"31 Yale vs. Y. M. C. A 

Apr. 1 Harvard vs. Andover 

" 1 1 Yale vs. Va. Uni ver^^ity 

" 3 [Harvard v.s. Mathews 

" 3 Yale vs. Va. Uinversity 

«* 4 Yale vs. Johns Hopkins 

" 5j Harvard vs. Leliiph 

" 5 Yale vs. Pa University 

" 5 Princeton vs. Vt. University. 
" 6| Princeton v.s. St. John's Col.. 
•* 6 Harvard vs. Pa. University. 
" 7 Georgetown Col. vs. Ilarv'rd 
" 7 HarVrd vs. Thompson Nine,] 

of Lyons ' 

" 8 Harvard vs. Va. University.! 
" 8 Princeton (Consolidated) vs.] 

Naval Cadets 

Nerv York vs. Princeton. . . ' 

Boston vs. Harvard 

Boston vs. Princeton 

Princeton vs. Dartmouth. . . 

Yale vs. Dartmouth 

N. r. vs. Yale (Under Grad.) 
Yale (Law Sch.) vs. Wesl'van 

Princeton vs. Lehigh 

Harvard vs. Williams 

New York A. C. vs. Yale. . . 

Brooklyn vs. Yale 

Harvard vs. Holy Cross 

Yale(L'wSoh.)vs.St.J'iisCol 
Ilarv'rd vs. Brown (Fresh.).. 

Harvard vs. Amherst 

New York vs. Yale 

•' 26i Harvard vs. Dartmouth 

" 26 Princeton vs. Lafayette — 
"26 Yale(LawSch.)vs. N.Y.A.C. 

"27 1 Yale vs. Georgetown 

" 29 Princeton vs. Cornell 

"29 Prin'ton (Fre.sh ) vs. Harv'd. 

" 29 Harvard vs. Brown 

"29 Yale vs. Williams 



Philadelp'ia 

Washington \ 

Cambridge. 

Richmond.. 

Cambridge 

Charl'ttsv'e 

Baltimore... 

Bethlehem . 

PliiladelpUa 

Princeton. . 

Fordham. . . 

Philadelp'ia 

Washingfn 

Cambridge. 
Charl'ttsv'e. 



PITCHEHS. 



" 8 
"11 

"12 
"13 
"14 
"17 
"18 
"19 
"19 
"19 
" 22 
"22 



24 



Annapolis. , 
New Y'ork., 
Hartford..., 
Princeton. 
Princeton. 
New Haven 
New Haven 
Middlet'wu. 
Princeton. . 
Cambridge. 
New York.. 
Brooklyn. . . 
Worcester. . 
Fordham . . 
Cambridge 
Cambridge. 
New York.. 
Cambridge. 
Princeton. . 
New Haven 
Washingfn 

llthaca 

Princeton.. 
! Providence 
IWilli'stown 



Bayne Carter, 11-6 

Case Coliileur 13-8 

Highlands.. Greenway 12-0 

|14-6 

Highlands. .McCarthyll-1 

I11-4 

Spear Stockdalel 7-7 

A.W ighl'ds . Gal lagher 14-2 

Carter Boswell] 8-7 

Forsvth Cooke 19-2 

Brokaw Smith! 4-1 

Wiggin Filbert 12-12 

Carmody. J. Highlands I 3-2 



Highlands 15 3 

Highlands Howe 3-3 



Kusie Forsyth 

Nicliols Highlands 

Nichols Brokaw 

Drake O'Connor 

Carter O'Connor 

King Davis 

Bowers Frost 

For.-yth Gallagher J 

Wiggin Howe 

Anderson Carter 

Stein Spear 

Highlands. ..Statlord 

Bowers Smith 

Warden . . .McMurray 

Wiggin Colby 

Crane Carter 

Highlands. .O'Connor 

iDrake Hugh 

[Bowers Wilson 

Hume Hugh 

Drake Priest 

I Kerr McCarty 

I Wiggin Sexton 

Carter Howe 



6-4 
7-0 

10-2 
7-1 
5-2 
4 

10-4 
6-3 

16-2 

15-1 
6-4 

13-6 
6-3 
7-1 
8 5 
6-0 
9-0 

20-0 

14-1 
7-3 

11-2 
3-2 
9-8 
7-5 

llO-O 



MAY GAMES. 



May 1 

" 2 
" 4 
" 5 
" 6 
'« 6 



Harvard vs. Tufts 

Yale vs. Brown 

Yale(L.S.)vs. Geo'etown. 
Brown vs. Yale (Law Sell.) 
Harvard vs. Princeton. . . 
Yale vs. Pa. University . . 
Hrv'd vs. A'lierst(Fresh.) 
Pa. Univ'ty vs. Harvard. 

Wesleyan vs. Yale 

Harvard vs. Lotoell 

Brown vs. Yale 

S. I. A. (J. vs. Yale (L.S.).. 
Harvard vs. Williams . . , 
Princeton vs. Lafayette. . 

Yale vs. Orange. 

Brown vs. Harvard 

Wesleyan vs. Yale(L..S). . 

Yale vs. Amherst 

Princeton vs. S. L C. C. . . 
Yale (L.S.) vs. Dartmouth 
Holy Cross vs. Harvard. . 

Dartmouth vs. Yale 

Yale vs. Princeton 

Pri'i'nvs. Harv'd{ Fresh.) 

Harvard vs. Amherst 

Yale vs. Wesleyan 

Princeton vs. Pa. Univ'ty 
Yale(L.S.)vs.N.Y.A. C 

Harvard vs. Williams 

Princeton vs. Pa. Univ'ty 

Yale (L. S.) vs. Brown 

Harvard vs. Princeton. . . 

Yale vs. Orange A. C 

Pa. Univ'ty vs. Yale (L. 8.) 
Yale vs. Phillips Acad'my 



PLAYED AT. 



Cambridge . 
New Haven 
Washington 
Providence. 
Princeton. . 
Hew Haven 
Cambridge. 
Philadelp'ia 
Middletown 
Cambridge . 
Providence. 
W. Brighton 
Willia'sto'n 

Easton 

Orauge,N.J. 
Cambridge. 
Middletown 
New Haven 
Livingston.. 
Hanover. , . 
Cambridge. 
Hanover. . . 
New Haven 
Cambridge . 
Amherst. .. 
Middletown 
Princeton.. 
New York.. 
Willia'sto'n 
Philadelp'ia 



Cambridge. 
Orange .... 
Philadelp'ia 
Andover. 



Highlands Wilson 

Carter White 



White Bowers 

Wiggm Drake 

Carter Reese 



Reese Wiggin 

Frost Davis 

Wiggin McCarthy 

Sexton Carter 

Clare Sharpe 

A. Highlands... Howe 

Drake Hugh 

Sp&ar Gilroy 

Sexton Wiggin 

Frost Lauder 

Carter Colby 

Drake Tyng 

Bowers. .Thornbor'gh 

Staflbrd WiggiQ 

Weston Sharpe 

Carter Drake 

Wilson Ames 

Wiggin Colby 

Davis Frost 

Drake Boswell 



Drake Bayne 

wiggin Drake 



Carter. 



. . . Bowers 19-7 
.(ireenway 2-0 



11-2 
7-0 

11-2 
7-4 
7-0 
5-4 

12-3 
7-6 
4-2 

18-0 
2-0 

16-5 
3-2 
3-2 

13-6 
2-2 
5-1 
6-3 
8-0 
2-1 
2-0 

11-3 
5-1 

11-2 
4-3 
3-2 

20-8 

18-6 

16-4 
5-4 
8-1 
9-8 



JUNE GAMES. 



Junel 
" 1 



Harvard vs. Georgetown. 

Prin't'nvs.St. John's Col. 

Amherst vs. Yale 

Harvard vs. Yale (L. S.) . . 

Princ't'nvs. Orange A. C. 

Georgetown vs. Princet'n 

Pa. Univ'ty vs. Princet'n. 

" 7 1 Yale vs. Andover 

' ' 8 j Harvard vs. Holy Cross . . 

" 10 Yale vs. Princeton 

" 10 Williams vs. Yale(L. S.). . 

" 10 Harvard vs. Brown 

*' 12 Harvard vs. Pa. Univer'ty 

'• 13 Vt. University vs. Yale. . . 
" 14 j Harvard vs Pa. Univ'ty. . 
" 15 1 Harvard vs. Yt. Univ'ty. . 

" 17 Yale vs Princeton 

" 24 [Harvard vs. Yale 



Cambridge 
Princeton., 
j Amherst. .. 
i Cam bridge. 

Orange 

Princeton. . 
Princeton. . 
New Haven 
Cambridge. 
Princeton . . 
Williamst'n 
Providence 
Cambridge 
Brattleboro 
New Haven 
Cambridge . 
Cambridge 
New York. . 
Cambridge. 



riTCIIERS, 



A.Highl'ds. .Carmody 

Forsyth Smith 

Colby Carter 



Dowd 

Bayne 

Davis 

Highlands. 
Carter... . 
Hollister ., 
Highlands. 
Highlands 
Bowers 



..Drake 
.Forsyth 
. . . Paige 
. StatTord 
. . . Drake 
.Bowers 
. . .White 
...Bayne 

Parsons 



Highlands. 
Highlands. 

Carter 

Highlands. 



.Boswell 
...Cook 
. . Drake 
..Carter 



-1 
19-7 
5-1 
4-3 
4-0 
6-4 



10-1 
2-0 
8-6 
2-0 
10-4 
4-2 
4-3 
14-8 
12-2 
14-7 
-2 



i6 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



JULY GAMES. 



DATE. 


CLUBS. 


PL.^YED AT. 


PITCHERS. 


2 
1 


July 1 


Hiirvard vs. Yule 


XewYork.. 
Chicago . . . 
Chicago . . . 
Chicago . . . 
Chicago . . . 
Chicago . . . 


Highlands.. 
Pond 


. . . Carter 


ft-4. 




N't. University vs. Yale (L. S. ) 
Yale(L. S.)vs. Vt. Univer'ty 

Yale vs. Va. University 

Yale vs. Amherst 


. Bowers'i-i-12 


"10 
"12 
" 13 


Carter 

Bowers 

Carter 

Carter 


...Cook 
...Hume 
....Colbv 
....Colby 


2-1 

8-2 
1-0 


"15 


Yale vs. Amherst 


9-0 



THE LEADING CONTESTS OF THE SEASON. 

THE MARCH CAMPAIGN. 

The first out-door work of the season of 1893 done by the 
Yale players was begun at New Haven, on March i8th, 
when all three of the college teams — University, Law School 
and Freshmen — were out on the field practicing under the 
professional supervision of pitcher John Clarkson. The 
same day the visiting nine of Columbia College played a 
game with the nine of the Johns Hopkins school at Balti- 
more, on which occasion the home nine won by 14 to 4. 

The Pennsylvania University nine opened theii field 
season on March 20th, when they played the Southwalk 
team of professionals, and won easily by 26 to 7. The same 
day the visiting Columbia College nine met the Georgetown 
College nine at Washington, the home nine winning by 
10 to 5. 

On March 24th, the Pennsylvania University nine had a 
practice game with the Swarthmore College nine, whom 
they whipped by 18 to 2; and on the 2Sth they gave the 
Swarthmores a dose of batting — done under the rules of 
1892 — to the tune of a score of 59 to i. The same day the 
Wesleyans began practice at Middletown, Conn. 

On JNIarch 2Sth the Pennsylvania University nine had an 
old time fungo game with the Swarthmore College nine, 
the " Pensys" winning by 59 to i. 

The Princetons took the field in a practice game for the 
first time in 1893, on March 29th, the University nine play- 
ing the Reserves under Dave Foutz' tuition. The same 
day the Johns Hopkins nine defeated Columbia College again 
at Baltimore by 14 to 4; and on March 30th, the George- 
town nine whipped the Columbias again at Washington, 
this time by 10 to 5. It was on this date that the Yale nine 
visited Philadelphia, full of confidence in their ability to 
take the Pennsylvania University nine into camp; but the 
"Pensys" did not see it in that light, and with the late 



BASE BALL GUIDE. II7 

lamented Bayne in the box against Yale's crack pitcher 
Carter, the Yales had to submit to defeat by 1 1 to 6, the 
attendance being the largest seen at any March game ever 
played in Philadelphia. 

On March 31st, the Columbia College nine — previously 
mdifferent to continued defeat — gave themselves a surprise 
party by defeating the Swarthmore nine, at Baltimore, by 
9 to 4. The same day the Yale nine played in Washington, 
and gave the Y. M. C. A.'s nine of that city a defeat by 
13 to 8. 

THE APRIL CAMPAIGN. 

On April ist — All Fools' Day — the Columbia College nine 
were the guests of the Naval Academy nine, at Annapolis, 
Md. , the cadets polishing the visitors off to the tune of 8 to 2. 
The same day the Harvards had the Andover nine to fool 
with at Cambridge, and they did it to the tune of 12 to o, 
the "cyclone" college pitcher, Highlands, being in the box 
against Greenway. 

It was on April ist, too, that a noteworthy contest took 
place on the ball field, at Richmond, Va., which brought 
out a crowd of society people of that city to see the visiting 
Yale nine play against the crack team of ihe Old Dominion, 
the Virginia University nine, from Charlottesville, the Yales 
taking their southern rivals into camp to the tune of 14 
to 6. The game was closely contested up to the 5th innings. 
It was greatly enjoyed by the city's fashionables, the turn- 
out of Richmond belles on the occasion being exceptional. 
The college nine of Yale can always expect a hearty wel- 
come in Richmond. The same day the " Pensys," flushed 
with victories over amateurs in general, and with their 
defeat of Yale in particular, thought they would try Harry 
Wright's professionals, but the result was defeat for the 
Pennsylvania University nine by 15 to 6. In this game the 
collegians had to face Keefe'sand Sharrott's pitching, Reese 
occupying the box for the collegians. 

On April 3d Harvard placed Highlands in the box against 
the Mathews nine at Cambridge, and the home team won 
by II to I. The same day the Yale nme met their Virginia 
University friends at Charlottesville, and they took the Vir- 
ginians into camp again, this time by 11 to 4. The Phillies, 
too, on April 3d, had another game with the "Pensys," 
Taylor pitching against Boswell.and the professionals won by 
9 to 3. At Washington the same date, the professional 
team of the city played the Swarthmore College nine and 
won by 25 to 5. 

On April 4th the New York ' ' Giants" had the Columbia 
College nine as visitors at their opening game, the profes- 



ii8 Spalding's op^ficial 

sionalswinning by i8 to 4. The same day a noteworthy 
contest took place at Baltimore which proved a surprise 
party for the home players, the latter being the Johns Hop- 
kins nine, who pushed the visiting Yale nine so closely that 
the latter were glad to end the game with a draw at 7 to 7. 
Spear pitched for Yale against Stockdale, who afterwards 
entered the professional ranks. 

On April 5th Harvard, Yale and Princeton all three took 
the field in match games, Harvard winning from Lehigh at 
Bethlehem by 14 to 2 with their "cyclone" pitcher in the 
box, Lehigh trying three pitchers; while Yale sur- 
prised the " Pensys" at Philadelphia with a defeat 
by 8 to 7, Carter pitching against Bosv/ell. The latter 
pitcher, however, retired after -the first innings, when 
Yale got 4 runs, and Reese pitched the game out. The same 
day the Princetons entertained the Vermont University 
nine, and with Forsyth in the box against Cook the home 
nine won by 6 to 3. At Middletown, Conn., on the same 
date, the Wesleyans had the C. C. of New York nine as 
visitors, and the New Yorkers had had enough exercise at 
the end of the 6tli inning, when the score stood at 19 to 2 
against them. On April 5th, too, the Boston champions 
visited Providence to play the Brown University nine, and 
the best the professionals could do was to win by 6 to 4, 
Nichols pitching against McMurray. It was the Browns' 
opening day and Lincoln field had a large assemblage of 
spectators to see the champions. The Browns tried four 
pitchers in the game and Stivetts followed Nichols on the 
other side. 

April 6th saw two notev.'orthy college games played, 
Princeton visiting St. John's College, Fordham, while the 
Harvards went to Philadelphia. Princeton found difficulty 
in whipping the young Jesuits of St. John's by 4 to i, 
Brokaw pitching against Smith ; while at Philadelphia a 
great crowd was assembled to see how the "Pensys" 
would make out in their first fight of the season with Har 
vard. The visitors placed Highlands in the box, but that 
fine player Wiggins also pitched, while Reese and Filbert 
did the pitching for the home nine. At the end of the ninth 
innings the score stood at 12 to 12, and both being content to 
let it remain so, a draw was the result, greatly to the grati- 
fication of the locals. 

April 7th proved to be a notable day for Washington col- 
legians, as on that day the Georgetown College nine went 
wild over the victory they scored in their game with the 
visiting Harvards, though the Harvards had "the terror," 
Highlands, in the box, Carmody pitching for the home nine 



BASE BAI,L GUIDE. II9 

with telling effect. On April 8th the Columbia College nine 
visited Eastern Park and had to succurnb to the Brooklyn 
professionals by 2 7 to 3, Stein pitching against Hutchins. On 
this date, too, the Harvards played the Virginia Univer- 
sity nine at Charlottesville, Va., and though they had Jack 
Highland in the box, against Hume, the best the visitors 
could do was to end the game with a draw, 3 to 3. The same 
day the ' ' Phillies" gave the ' ' Pensys" a lesson to the tune of 
8 to o, Taylor pitching against Filbert, who was nuts for the 
Quakers. The Princetons, too, the same day, visited the 
Polo grounds, and they were shut out by 7 to o, Rusie and 
King pitching against Forsyth. At Washington, the same 
date, the Vermont University nine got a draw with the 
Georgetown College nine by 8 to 8. At Cincinnati, the 
same date, the Cincinnati University nine tried their strength 
against the professional "Reds" and were whipped by 32 
to 7. 

On April loth the Yale men, home from their Easter trip 
— during which they lost but one game, won four and drew 
one — played the Boston champions, and with Nichols and 
Stivetts in the box against Carter, Davies and Warner, the 
best the professionals could do was to win by 8 to 8. The 
same day a ten innings game marked the contest at Char- 
lottesville, Va., between the Virginia and Vermont Univer- 
sity nines, the home nine winning by 6 to 3. At Boston, 
the same day, the Tuft's nine beat the Boston University 
nine by 3 to o, they shutting them out without a hit to their 
credit. 

On April nth the Dartmouth College nine tested their 
strength against the "Phillies" at Philadelphia, the profes- 
sionals winning by 5 to 2 only, Weyhing pitching against 
O'Connor. 

On April 12th, the Boston professionals visited Princeton, 
and took the University team into camp by 7 to i, Nichols 
pitching against Brokaw; Dartmouth also defeated the 
Lehighs at Bethlehem by 12 to 5 the same day. On April 
13th, Pnnceton had to play hard to whip the visiting Dart- 
mouth nine by 5 to 2, Drake pitching against O'Connor. 
Princeton only made 4 hits off the latter. 

On April i jth, Dartmouth tried Yale at New Haven, and 
facing Carter's skilful pitching, the visitors were shut out 
4 to o. The same day at Lexington, Va. , the vi.siting Ver- 
mont University nine defeated the Washington and Lee 
University nine by 12 to 3. On the same date, too, an 
exceptional contest took place at Birmingham, Ga., in which 
the nines of the Alabama University and the Vanderbilt 
University were the contestants, and so closely was the 



T20 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



game contested that at the end of the sixteenth innings, the 
game had to be drawn at 2 to 2. 

On April 15th, the Pensys and the Vermont University- 
nine indulged in a regular fungo hitting game, in which 
the home team were defeated by 29 to 15; Cook and Reese 
were both ofT in their pitching, no less than 35 base hits 
being made in the game. 

On April 17th, Yale's undergraduate team had a game 
with the New York Giants at New Haven, which the pro- 
fessionals won by 10 to 4. The same day the Boston cham- 
pions began a series of games at Charlottesville, Va., against 
the University nine, in which the professionals won the 
series by 19 to 5. 7 to 5 and 9 to 8 — ten innings — Stivetts 
pitching against Parker in this last game, which ended 
April 19th, Bostons only making 9 hits off Parker; in the 
last game played on the 21st, Boston won by 35 to 13. On 
April 20th, the Maine college nines got to work at Ports- 
mouth, the Bates College nine beating the locals by 16 to 8. 
The same day the Colby nine beat the Twitchells at Port- 
land by 30 to 6, and the Portland New England League 
professionals defeated the Bowdoin College nine by 3 to 
2 only. 

On April 21st, the Columbia College nine played on their 
new grounds at Williams' Bridge with the Wesleyans, and 
the latter won by 7 to 6 only. 

Saturday, April 22d, was a busy among the college nines 
of the country, as will be seen by the appended record of 
the most prominent of that day's games. Among the 
games m which the college nines met professional teams on 
that date, were the following: 



Cli-bs. 


Played at 


PlTCIIEK^^. 





Brooklyn vs YhIc 


Eastern Park. . . 

Haltimore 

Ithaca 


Stein 

Scliiniclt 

Camplleld 


Spenns-fi 


Baltimore vs. Johns Hopkins 
Binghamton vs. Cornell [J.... 


.Davis 
.i'riest 


17-6 
2-1 



The other college games of the same day were as follov.'s: 



Clubs. 


Played at 


Pitchers. 


2 




Harvard vs. Holy Cross 

Harvard (Freshin'n) vs. Rrown 
Yale (Law School) vs.Fordhani 
Princeton vs. Wesleyan 


Worcester 

Cambridge .... 
St.John'sCoirge 

Princeton 

Philadelphia... 
Williamstovvn . 
Champaign, 111. 


J. Highlands ...Stiillord 

Warden McMnrray 

Bowers Smilii 


6-3 

8-5 

7-1 


Forsvili Frost 


U-G 

28-1 

6-1 

6-5 


P.i University vs. Columbia. . 
Williams vs Col pate 


lleese Stewart 


Mich. Univ'tv vs. 111. Univ'ty 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 121 

Oa April 24th, Harvard beat Amherst at Cambridge by 
6 to o, Wiggin pitching against Colby. The " Pensys," 
too, took the Wesleyans into camp the same date at Phila- 
delphia by 30 to 2, Bayne pitching against Frost, the homo 
team giving the latter a hot time of it. 

April 26th was the great day of the Columbian Naval 
Parade in New York, on which occasion the Yale nine got 
shut out by g to o in New York by the " Giants," and with 
Carter in the Yale box, too. Harvard also " Chicagoed" the 
Dartmouth nine at Cambridge the same day by 20 to o, 
Highlands pitching against O'Connor. Cornell, too, took 
the visiting Williams College nine into camp at Ithaca by 
12 to 7, and Princeton whipped the -Lafayette College nine 
by 14 to I at Princeton; the Yale (Law School) nine also 
defeated the picked team of the New York Athletic Club 
nine at New Haven by 7 to 3. 

On April 2C)th, the first game of the series at the New 
York State College League was played at vSchenectady, when 
the Union College nine defeated the Colgates by 5 to 4. 
On that date, too, a noteworthy game was played at West 
Point, between the Cadets and Columbia College nines. 
Cadets winning by 8 to 2. The fine battery work of 
Hinkley and Rice, of the Cadets, was a feature. The same 
day the Harvards visited Providence, and had trouble in 
beating the Browns by 7 to 5. The Freshmen match, too, 
between Princeton and Plarvard was played on the same 
date, at Princeton, the home team winning by g to 8 ; the 
Princeton University nine playing on that date at Ithaca, 
when they defeated the Cornells by 3 to 2, Drake pitching 
against Priest. This ended the April contests of note in 
the college arena. 

The most noteworthy college game of the April campaign 
was that played at Birmingham, Ala. , on April 14th, in which 
the nines of the Alabama and the Vanderbilt Universities 
were the contestants in a sixteen innings game, which ended 
in a drawn match with the score at 2 to 2. The Alabama's 
first baseman. Smith, made three hits out of the five scored 
on that side, and he scored the two runs ; right fielder Hen- 
drix scoring the two runs on the other side by the good hit- 
ting of Short and Hunt; the visitors scoring 12 hits off 
Morrow's pitching, though only one run was earned by them. 
Here is the score, which is incomplete in its summary: 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



U. OK ALAHAMA. 


.V. 


K 





n 


B 




3 
1 


2 

7 

5 

29 

3 

§ 




Ts 


21 

2 o: 

6' 1 

11 li 
2 0| 

o; 

61 li 

01 0' 

o|o; 

19l3| 


1 Vandehbilts. 


AB 


K 


li 


1- 

1 

I 

3 
1 
2 

48 


A 


- 


Morrow p. 


t 

6 

6 
6 


!J. Fletcher, lb 

jlhoinpsoii, l.f 

F. Fletcher, c 

[Barr, c.f 


7 
5 
6 

7 
7 
7 

50 


ol 2 


nj 1 


Fergusou, c 

Friediuan, 2b 

Smith, lb 


2 
2 


2 







1 
1 

2 
2 
2 




41 

01 


Kyser, 2 b 


McKenzie, 2b 

Jones, 3b 


2 


Little 1 f 


6J O] 
6' 


7 


3 

21 


1 


Powers, s s 


Hendrix, r.f 

Short, s s ... 





Bankhead r f 


6l0 

5| 

52 2 


1 




1 


Abbott, c.f 


IJimt,p 





Totals 


Total 


212 


8 










.00001010000 
.00100001000 


0—2 


Vauderbilts 




0—2 



Earned run— Vauderbilts. Stolen bases— Fergusou, Smith, o; Kyscr, 
Fletcher, 3; Barr, McKenzie, 2; Jones, 2; lleudrix. 2; Short, 2; Hunt, 3. First 
onballs— OtriluJit, 1. Hit by pitcher— By Morrow, 1. Umpire— Lei gli Carroll. 
Time of game— 2 hours and 45 minutes. 

Another notable contest in April was the victory over 
Harvard won by the Georgetown College nine on April 7th 
at Washington, "in which the local collegians got in 9 hits 
off Highlands, while the best the Harvards could do off Car- 
mody's pitching was a record of but 3 hits. The George- 
town fielding was up to a high mark, especially that of the 
brothers Mahoney, Frothingham's second base playing being 
the fielding feature on the other side ; Corbett, too, catch- 
ing Highland's pitching finely. Here is the score: 



Georgetown. 


1- 


IB 

~i 






1 





3 


PO 

2 
3 

6 
1 

10 

1 

4 



27 



6 

s 



1 
2 
1 


fo 


£ 














Harvard. 


R 

1 
1 











PO 




1 



11 


9 


♦26 


- 


K 


Harley.l.f 

E. Mahoney, 2b 

Sii1liva.n p. 


V.\ 

..' 
.. 


Hallo well, c.f 

Cook, 3b 


ol 

li 


Sullivan, s s 


1 


3 


5 
3 

13 





Garvev 8 s 


Abbott, r.f 

Frothingliam, 2b 

Dickinson, lb 

Upton, l.f 

Corbett, c 

J. Highlands, p 





Oarinody, p 

G. Mahoney, lb 

Oarlon,3b 

Murphy, r.f 

Walsh, c.f 


..' 1 
..[ 
• • 

..! 
..1 1 





1 



1 


Totals 


.. 3 


Totals 


2 



E. Mahoney out for obstructing lielder. 



Geor?etown 
Harvard 



10 10 
2 



1 0—3 
0—2 



Earned runs— Harvard, 2 ; Georgetown, 1. First base on balls— Carlon, 
Harley, 2; (Jarvey, 2; E. Mahoney, 2: Welsh, Upton, O^ok, Carmody. Hit by 
pitcher— Ilarley. First base on error— (ieorgetown. Left on base— George- 
town, 10; Harvard, 7. Struck out— By Highlands, 9; by Carmody, 5. Passed 
ball— Corbett. Wild piich— Carmodv. Stolen biises-CarldU, 2 ; Garvey, 
Harley, Corbett, Hallowell, Cook. Sacrifice hits— Sullivan, Georgetown, 3; 
Sullivan, Harvard, 1. Time of game— 2 hours. Umpire— Snyder. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



123 



The best April game played by the nine of Brown Univer- 
sity was that which took place at Providence on April 29th, 
on which occasion the Browns took the Harvards into camp 
by the appended score. Sexton was in the box for Brown, 
and, with the exception of the sixth innings, pitched a good 
game, considering he was ill with tonsilitis. The fielding 
of both teams was at times very brilliant. The score: 



Brown. 



Weeks, lb.. 
Sexton, p . . 
Teiiaey, c. 
Sterre, s.s.. 
Jones, 2!) .., 
Masill, 3b.. 
Greene, r.f.. 
George, c.f. 
McLane, l.f. 
Bustard, r.f. 



Totals. 



rJl E 


PO 


A 


E 





■I 


u 













1 


3 





1 




8 








: 




2 


I 





c 




1 


3 


1 







1 


3 


1 
















1 


1 


1 








] 




1 








1 





1 





1 


5 


9 


27 


1.0 


3 



Harvard. 



Hallowell. c.f 

Abbott, l.f 

Frothingliain,r.f. 

Cook, 3b 

Hovey, 2b 

Trafforcl, 1!) 

Sullivan, s.s 

Upton, c 

Wiggin, p 



Totals. 



k^ 


IB 


PO 


A 


!o 


2 


2 





1 


1 


1 








1 








1 


1 





1 


1 


1 


4 


2 


2 


1 


8 


1 





1 


2 


1 


2 


2 


8 







1 





1 


' 


11 


27 


9 



Brown . . , 
Harvard. 



00004011- 
0000040 0- 



Earned runs— Brown, 2; Harvird, 4. First base on errors— Brown, 2; 
Harvard, 2. Left on bases— Brown, 7; Harvard, 10. First base on balls— 
Otr Sexton, 5; off Wiggin, 5. Struck out— By Sexton, 6; by Wiggin, 7. Sac- 
rifice hits— Cook, Wiggin. Stolen bases— Sexton, 2; Bustard, 2; Tenney, 
Alibott Double play— Sterre and Weeks. Umpires— Burns and Murray. 
Time of game— 2 hours and thirty minutes. 

The largest crowd of spectators ever gathered upon Percy 
Field at Ithaca, was that attracted by the first game of the 
season between the Cornell University nine and the Prince- 
ton nine, which took place on April 29th, 1893, besides which 
the contest proved to be one of the most exciting the Cornell 
nine ever took part in, eleven innings having to be played 
before a conclusion was reached, and then the visiting col- 
lege nine only won by the small score of 3 to 2. The 
opposing pitchers were Drake and Priest, and both did 
affective work in the box, a single run on each side being 
all that was earned. The Princetons led off with i to o, 
and it was not until the sixth innings that the Cornells scored 
a run, and then they tied the score i to i. In the eighth 
innings each added a single run to the score, and the ninth 
ended wnth the score of 2 to 2, amidst the greatest excite- 
ment, the close fight made by the local collegians being 
u^nexpected. In the eleventh innings a battery error, a base 
hit and a fielding error enabled the Yales to score the win- 
ning run, as will be seen by the appended score: 



124 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



Cornell. 


]{ 

1 



S 





1 

2 


I B 

■ 

1 




1 




PO 




10 
4 

13 
3 
1 


*31 




3 
3 

1 

I 

3 



E 





1 


2 
1 

i\ 


Princeton . 


1 


1 
1 

2 




3 


IB 

2 
1 

2 

1 


1 




PO 

1 
1 

5 
2 



I 

20 
33 


A 

3 

2 



t 

1 


15 


E 


Towie, c.f 


King, 2b 


•H 


Best, l.f 


Woodcork, c.f 

Trenchard, c . 


n 


H Tavlor c 


n 




McKenzie, l.f 





J Tavlor, lb 


Pavnc, r. f 





Johnson, 3b 

Hamlin, r.f 

Priest, p 

O'Counur, s.s 


Guild, 3b 

Drako, p 

Brooks, s.s 




1 
n 


Otto, lb 





Totals 


Totals 


3 



*VVinniag run made with one man out. 

Princeton 1000000100 1—3 

Cornell 0000010100 0—2 

Earned runs — Cornell, 1; Princeton, 1. Sacrifice hits — Cornell, 3; Prince- 
ton, 3. Hit with ball— O'Conner, Trenchard, Woodcock, McKenzie. Stolen 
bases — Cornell, 4; J'rinceton, 4. Wild pitches— Priest, 2. Passed ball- 
Taylor. Struck out— By Priest, 13; by Drake, 4. Time of game— 2 hours 
and 30 minutes. Umpire— .McCauley. 

It was during the April campaign that an event occurred 
worthy of special note, and that was the first meeting 
between Freshmen nine of Princeton and Harvard, which 
took place at Princeton on April 29th, the result being a 
closely contested game, in which the home team came in 
victorious by 9 to 8. The Harvards had McCarty in the box 
all through the game, but Kerr, of Princeton, who pitched 
in the first three innings, was retired after the third, as 5 
runs were scored off nine hits from his pitching in the first 
three innings. Wilson then took his place there, and not 
another run was earned by the Harvards, and only six hits 
in as many innings made off his pitching. The Princetons 
won by their superior fielding. Here is the score : 



Princeton, '96. 



Ward,2b 

Gunster, 3b 

Gray, s.s 

Small, l.f 

W. 1). Ward, lb. 

Williams, c 

Johnson, r.f 

Anderson, r.f.. 

Kerr, p 

Wilson, p 





1 B 


PO 


A 


EJ 


1 


1 


2 


4 


2' 


1| 1! 2 








2 


3 2 


4 





2 


3; 2 





ll 





1 11 








1 


1 5 


3' 0: 





1! 1 


0, 0| 





C 2 


0' 01 


1 


0' 


1|0 


1 


o| 


2|0| 


9 


ll 


-^ 


14 


'3! 



Harvard, '96. 



0»Malley,c 

Winslow, 3b. .. 

Brown, s.s 

Hayes, 2b 

Ganderman, l.f. 

McCarty, p 

(Jriffin, lb 

Pain, c.f 

Morse, r.f 



— — !— Totals, 



R 


1 B 


PO 


A 


2 


2| 3 





2 


1 2 


2 


1 


1 1 


2 


2 


3 2 





131 





0, 2i 1 


5 


0| 2 


9 





0; 


4 





0, 1 


1 





8 


15 


24 


9 



Harvard, '96.. 
Princeton, '96 



3 2 2 
3 113 



1 0—8 
1 X-9 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



25 



Earned runs— Princeton, 2 ; Harvard, 5. Bases stolen— Princeton, 5; 
Harvard, 4. I'.ases on balls— Off McCarty, 5; off Wilson, 2. Hit by pitched 
ball— Griffin. Struck out— By McCarty, 2; by Iverr, 2; by Wilson, 3. Passed 
ball— Williams. Umpire— Duffield. Time of game— 1 hour and 45 minutes. 

THE MAY CAMPAIGN. 

The May campaign in the college arena was marked by- 
several specially noteworthy contests, besides w^hich the 
series of contests between Harvard, Yale and Princeton 
began, as also the championship games between the college 
nines of Dartmouth, Williams and Amherst, and also the 
intercollegiate series between the college nines of the 
western part of New York State. In fact. May was the 
month in which the college clubs of the country divided 
interest with the professional teams to quite a considerable 
extent, especially in the case of the field meetings between 
the strong nines of Harvard, Yale, Princeton and the Penn- 
sylvania University. It was in this month, too, that the 
college nines of the Cornell and Wesleyan and Brown Uni- 
versities distinguished themselves by noteworthy victories 
over the ' ' big three " of Harvard, Yale and Princeton, some- 
thing quite new to college club history. 

The most conspicuous contests in the college arena during 
May and June included the following games worthy of 
special record. 

The most brilliant exhibition of fielding ever seen on the 
Holmes Field at Cambridge in 1893 was that which marked 
the drawn games between the nines of Harvard and Brown 
Universities, played on May 15, the score being as follows. 
Sexton was hit only five times, with a total of ten, while 
Brown made eight off Wiggins delivery. There were 
1,500 persons present, among whom was a delegation of 
Brown men, nearly 100 in number. The enthusiasm and 
cheering would have done honor to a Yale game. The 
score : 



Haryaiid. 



Hallowell, c.f.... 

Abbott, l.f 

Frothingham, r.f . 

Cook, 3b 

Hovey, 2b 

Trafford, lb 

Sullivan, s.s'. 

Wiggin, p 

Upton, c 



Totals. 



R 


IB 


PO 


A 


E 





1 


2 


1 











3 














1 








1 


1 


1 


1 








2 


2 


2 











11 














2 


3 














4 


1 


1 


1 


8 


1 


« 


^ 


^ 


30 


11 


^1 

I 



Brown. 



,1b 

Sexton, p 

Tenney, c...., 
Steere, s.s...., 

Jones, 2b 

Magill, 3b 

George, c.f. . . , 

Cook, r.f 

McLane,l.f 

Gillan, l.f 

McMurray,l.f. 



Totals 2 



R IC PC A 



30 14 4 



I2( 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



Harvard , 
Brown.. 






1 

















1 





0- 


-2 








2 




















0- 


'•I 



Earned run—Harvard. First base by errors— Harvard, 4. Left on 
bases— Harvard, o; Brown 6. First base on balls— orrsexton. 1 : oir ^\ i<r?in, 
2 Struck out— By Wipgiu, 5. Sacrifice hits— Hovey, Hallowcll. Stolen 
bases— Ilallowcli, Abbott. Double plav— Upton and Sullivan. Passed ball 
—Upton. Umpires— Murray and Buriis. Time of game— 2 hours and 40 
minutes. 

The best game of the intercollegiate championship games 
between the Amherst, Williams and Dartmouth nines in 
1893 was that played at Williamstown, Mass., :May 30th. 
Here is the score : 



TTlLLIAMS. 


AD 


■= 


B 


P 



1 



A 

6 

1 
4 
1 


h 


1 




Amuekst. 


AB 


kJ b r 

1 
6 
7 
C 


A 


E 


Eaton, 2b 


3 
3 
3 


f1 


Cheney, c.f 

Allen, c 

Hunt, lb 


4 
4 
3 

i 

3 
3 
3 
3 

r.o 



2 

2 





Anderson, 3b 

Hollister, p ........ 

Draper c 


1 





2 

1 



1 


Stearns, 21) 


2 


Hammell,l.f 

Ide, s s 


nl fi' n 


1 
n 


Smith, l.f 


oJ 0| 


0! 1 ifi! 


Landis, s.s 

K. Ellis, 3b 


0; 2, 0| 1 






Oil 

1,23 





Cleveland, c.f 

Baker r f * 





1 


3 
2 10 

7 27 15 


Jackson, l.f 





^1 


Colby, p 


6 2 








Totals 


33 


Totals 


10 6 






1 


1 _ 








1 




— 



Williams 1 .x-1 

Amherst 0-0 

First on balls— Cleveland. First on errors— Cheney, Allen. Ide, Ilammell, 
Baker. Struck out-Bv Hollister, 3; by Colby 3. Stolen ixise— Hoili.-ter. 
Triple play— Stearns, Hunt. Umpire— Brady. Time of game— 1 hour and. 
35 minutes. 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP TEAMS OF THE I^EADING 
UNIA'ERSITIES. 

HARVARD, YALE AND PRINCETON. 

The most interesting series of games between the "big 
three" nines of the college arena in 1893 were the three 
contests between the university nines of Harvard and Yale, 
which series began on June 24th, at Cambridge and ended 
on July ist, at the Polo Grounds. On the occasion of the 
opening match of the series on the Holmes Field at Cam- 
bridge "the attendance of spectators was the largest known 
to Harvard College base ball history. The Boston papers 
reported the numbers present as nearly 10,000, the Gover- 
nor of the State being present as well as a number of city 
dignitaries. The attendance of ladies was the most attract- 
ive feature of the vast assemblage, and the deep interest 
taken in the game, and the intense excitement towards the 
finish was exceptional in its character. The two crack 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



127 



ten innings contest one sij^gi Etching, while the Yale 

batsmen could sc^re off Carter sp ^^^^ ^^ Highlands 

innings, when ^e Harvara twa ^^ _,^^^^ ^{t^r that 
which set the crowd wild. Nei Wer s ^^,^^ scored by 
:„til the t^-l^-^XS,t^^^ll rxcitini yells and hurrahs. 
SSrisTe'^c^'rH^thLe^ 

Yale. 

Murptiy, s.s 

Beall, 2b 

Case, l.f •••• 

StepUensou, 10.. 

Speer, r.f ■ 

Bliss, c.f. ...... 

ArbutUuot, 3b.. 
Kedzii^ c. 



Keuz.1^-, V. „ 

Carter, p "^ 




l| Mason, c 

1 Abbott, 3b....... 

Hallo well, c.f.... 

0' Upton, l.f ••• 

0' Frothingham, 2b 

0' Cook, r.f. 

J. Higlilancls,p.. 
11 Sullivan, s.P -■ 
Trafford,lb 



*28 27! 3 



Yale 




To To To ro "0 ?=i 

Kecizie,3.Dmpires-Bondainn.urj ,„,, nlace at New Haven 
The second game o£ ttesenes took place at ^.^^ .. ^ 

on June 2,th, and the resuU oUhe co^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 

glorious victory for the ome .^_ ^j^^ ^^ s. The 

Ind the tally was even game ana ga Highlands' cyclone 
Harvard again d^Pf nded oj^ J^^^^^,,^ ,,Ss unequal to he 
delivery, but unluckily for them 1 ,^^,j^_ a„a. so the 

arduous task of <:atching his ^^li<l s ^^^.^^^ 

Yale batsmen got 7 ^'t^ °« !'^|„Pi"Se was so well supported 
so effective on the other side, anon ^^^ visiting bats- 

By Kedzie behind the l^f .• *^^. Mts But the two teams 
S=n could do was to g?* '" thf ^its.^^^^ .^^^^^^_ ,^ 

made a very close fight ot it up 



128 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



which the home team got in tliree runs, due to an error by- 
Mason at the plate, and a wild throw to second by High- 
lands, which sent in two runs. In Harvard's ninth innings 
they failed to score and the blue came in victors by 3 to a 
with an innings to spare. The attendance was the largest 
ever seen on the Yale field, the galaxy of New Haven 
beauties present being the attractive feature. Here is the 
score : 



IIakv.vki). 


i:| n 


PO 


A 

1 
1 



1 



1 

1 

6 


e| Yale. 


i;' 11 

111 
1 
11 1 

0; 


2 
U 


3|7 


i'O 


A 


E 


Mason, c 


oil 
0; 1 



0, 



7 


1 
2 
3 

n 


2 1 Murphv, s s 



1 

5 
12 

1 
2 

6 



4 


I 

2 

i 

12 





Abbott, 3b 


! Bea;l, -ib 


1 


Ilallowoll, c.f 

Upton, l.f 

Frothinfrliain, 21) 

Cook, r.f 


ICa^e, l.f 

Stepheus.iu, 11) 

0: Speer, r.f 

1 Bliss, c.f 


'0 

1 


llifrlilanr.s. p 

Sullivan, s.s 

Trail'ord, lb 


0; 1 
0, 3 

1] 7 


j Arbuthnot, 3b 


f> 


Kedzie, c 

' Carter, p 








il '^ 




Totals 


0|3 


" 


2|| Totals 


^ 



Harvard 00000000 0—0 

Yale 3 0—3 

Ba.<cs on balLs— Harvard, 1. Left on bases— Yale, 5 ; Harvard, 5. Tlirce- 
base hit— Tranord. Struck out— Stephenson, Speer, 2; Arbutlmot, Kedzie, 2; 
Upto;i,2; Sullivan, Tratlbrd, 2. Passed balls— Mason, 2. AUeudance, 6,000. 
Umpires— Cuiry and Bond. 

The third and last game of the series was played at the 
Polo Grounds on July ist, wiili the self-same batteries in 
position, and this time Harvard led the score from start to 
finish, fielding errors giving the game to the victors, as the 
earned runs were even 2 to 2, while Yale led in base hits 
by 8 to 7. We saw this game and therefore give a complete 
analytical score of the contest, one which the college clubs 
should adopt for I S94, as it gives the chances for catches 
offered off the pitching, as well as the number of runners 
forwarded by base hits, botli of which show the weak and 
strong points of the batting, which the other scores do not. 



HARVARD. 



Mason, c 

Abbolt, 3b 

Ilallowell, -.f 

Upton, l.f 

Frothingham, 2b. 

Cook, r.r 

HUrhlands, p 

Sullivan, s.s 

TratTord, lb 



Totals 6 



27,12 3' I 



YAI.E. 



3 Murphv, s.s... 

Beall,2b 

case l.f 

0: St€'pheuson, lb 

Speer, r.f 

Bliss, c.f 

Arbuthnot, 3b. 

;Kedzie, c 

Carter, p 



Totals 4 



|k 


IB 


PO 


A 




— 







1 1 


2 





6 


2 











1 


2 











1 


11 








•2 


1 








1 


3 


1 








1 


1 








9 


6 








2 





4 


8 


27 


u 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



129 



SCOKE BY INNINGS. 

Harvard l 3 

Yale 2 









2 6 

2-4 



BASE HITS EACH INNINGS. 

Harvard 1 3 2 ]— 7 

Yale 2 110 4-8 

First base by errors— Harvard, 2; Yale 1. Battery errors— Harvard, 2; 
Yale, 2. Left on bases— Harvard, 4; Yale, 3. Cbancos for catchers— Harvard, 
10; Yale 8. Sacrifice hits— By Hallowell, 1. Stolen bases— By Ma^on, 1; 
Hallo well, 1; Upton. 1; Sullivan, 1 ; Traflford, 1 ; Murphy, 2; Beall, 1; Case, 1; 
Speer, 1. Kunners forwarded by base hits— By Sullivan 3; Upton, 1; 
Frothinghani, l; Speer, 2; Case 1; Bliss, 1. Balks— By Highlands, 4; 
Carter, 2. 

PITCHING SCOKE. . 

Innings pitched— By Carter, 9; t^y Highlands, 9. Base hits— Off Carter, 
7; oil' Highlands, 8. Runs earned- Off Carter, 2; olf Highlands, 2. Bases 
on balls— By Carter, 1; by Highlands, 2. Hit batsman— By Carter, 1. 
Struck out/— By Carter, 13; by Highlands, 10. U-mpires— Curry and Bond. 
Time of game— 2 hours and 25 minutes. 

YALE VS. rRINCETON. 

The series of games between the university nines of Yale 
and Princeton for 1893 began on May 20th at New Haven, 
on which date full}?- 5,000 spectators were gathered on the 
Yale fielc! to witness the contest. The opposing pitchers 
were Carter, of Yale, and Drake, of Princeton, and the 
home team held the lead from start to finish, though the 
game was far from being the one-sided contest the score 
would lead one to suppose it was. Yale led by 2 to o at the 
start, and were in the van by 5 to o at the end of the fourth 
innings. After that Princeton had the best of it as they got 
in a run by fielding errors and blanked their opponents in 
four successive innings. Carter's effective delivery, splen- 
didly backed up by Kedsie, proved too much for the Prince- 
ton batsmen, only 5 hits being made off his pitching. 
Drake, too, was effective, not one of the five runs made on 
Yale being earned off the pitching, only 6 hits being made. 
Here is the score: 



Pkinceton. 



King, 2b 

Woodcock, c. f . 

McKenzie, 1. f 

Payne, r. f 

Guild, lb. s. s. . . 
Trenchard, c . . . 

Gunster, 3b 

Brooks, P. s 

Otto, lb i 

. Drake, p 



Totals. 



K 


IB 


PO 


A 


E 










6 


2 





I 


1 


1 











j^ 








4 








1 





2 


1 








t 





1 


1 


2 


1 


^ 





1 


6 


2 


lb 








1 


1 





i 

















] 








s 


1 


2 


1 











•2 





( 


h 


6 


*23 


10 


3 





Yale. 



Ruston, 3b 

Arbuthnot, 3ij,. 

Beall, c. f 

Case, 1. f 

Stephenson, lb 

I Speer, r. f 

Bliss, s. s 

Hedges, 2b 

Kedzie, c 

Carter, p 



Totals. 



R 1 B 


PO 


A 


0, 


3 





0! 


1 


3 


2 2 


1 





1 1; 








' 0; 2' 1 





i 1 li 





l| 0| 


2 


1 


1 


14 


6 


10 





i5| 6 


27 


12 



♦Hedges out, hit by batted ball. 



130 



Spalding's official 



RUNS BACH INNINGS. 

Princeton r> « « 

Yale ^ P 1 0-1 

were Carter and Drake the opposing pitchers Drake wa^ 

Tn tCfew'oJf ""'u ^----k. but ^?a^s not well su^^^^^^^^^^ 
in the field, Otto showing up weak at short. But despite 
of the errors, \ ale only made 2 hits in the entire game and te 
f^LT'' P""^^.^«" getting 7 hits Off Carter, butThey f ii^^^^ 
to field a run owmg to the superior fielding of the Visitors 
Good base running by the Yale helped^ them to victory 
\ae scored their singles in the second and fourthlnS; 
and drew blanks in the last five. Here is ^he score 



Yale. 



Murpliv, s.s... 0' 

Beal], 2b ■" ol 

Case, I. f Qi 

Stephenson. 11,.. ]',".' I ol 



u IB 




Speer, r.f 

Bliss, c.f : 

Kedzie, c 


I 



1 


Carter, p 

Riiskin, 3 ».... 




Totals 





Princeton. 



Payne, r. f . 

(Juild.lb 

1 King, 2b 

Trencliard, r. f 
Woodcock,], f. 

Huiiiphrevs, c 
6 Gunster, 3t) 
11 Otto, s. s. .. 
Drake, p. 




PO 



A K 



1 ol 

11, li 1 

2j 1 

0! 0! 





This settled the tourney between them, but for eate 
money purposes they played the third game at the Polo 
grounds. June 17th. when Yale won easily in an uniiUerest- 
mg contest by 14 to 7 in runs; 14 to 7 in base hits Tto '3 
in fielding errors and 2 to 2 in earned run.s. Carter and 
Davis pitching against Drake. 

THE INTERCOLLEGIATE RECORl> FOR 1893. 

The struggle for the championship of the Intercollegiate 
Association o^ xNew England colleges was an interefting 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



T31 



among Which was the ar^^^^^^ Williams, which ended with 

town, b^tw^\^^^\\'X end ^^ '^^ '''^ ^^^^"^'- ^1^""^ 
a score of 2 to 2 at tne en ^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

record of the championship campaign : 



DATl 



Clubs. 



Played at 



May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 



Williams vs. Dartmouth 

Dartmouth vs. Williams 
Amherst vs. Williams.. 
Amherst vs. Dartmouth 
Dartmouth vs. Amherst 
Williams vs. Amherst.. 
Dartmouth vs. Williams 
Williams vs. Dartmouth 
Amherst vs. Dartmouth 
10 Amherst vs. Dartmouth 
20 Amherst vs. Williams. 



Pitchers. 



Williamstown,Hovve .... .^.O^Connor 

WilliamstownOMJonnor...HolUs^^^^^^ 

Colby O'Connor 

O'Connor.,.. Gregory 

IloUister Colby 

O'Connor.... llollister 
Hollister.... O'Connor 

Colby O'Connor 

Gregory.... O'Connor 
Colby Hollister 



Amherst . . 

Amherst . . 

Amherst . . 

Williamstown 

Hanover... 

Hanover... 

Hanover... 

Hanover... 

Williamstown 



23| Amherst vs' Williams .. I Amherst , 



I Colby, 



.Hollister 



9-5 

2-2 
10-2 
11 4 
4 
1-0 
6-2 
5-2 
6-3 
5-3 
11-5 
4-2 



The record in full is as follows: 




The players of the three clubs were 
Williams. 



AMHERST. 

Colby, p. 
Allen, c. 
Hunt, lb. 
Stearns, 2b. 
Ellis, 3b. 
Landis, s.s. 
Jackson, r.f. 
Cheney, c.f. 
Smith, l.t 



Hollister, p. 
Draper, c. 
Towne, lb. 
Eaton, 2b. 
Anderson, 3b. 
Ide, s.s. 
Baker, r.f. 
Cleveland, c.f. 
Hammott, l.f. 



follows : 

DARTMOUTH. 

O'Connor, p. 
Ranney, c. 
Tuxbury, 11). 
gmalley, 2b. 
Griffin, 3b. 
Ferguson, s.s. 
Dinsmore, r.f. 
Clagmot, c.f. 
Abbott, 1.;. 



132 SPALDING S OFFICTAf. 

CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD. 




Note. For Specifications see Rules from No. 2 to No. 13. 

For convenience of Amateurs we publish at the end of the 
Guide a copy of last year's diagram. 



THE PLAYING RULES 

OF 

ofessional * Base * Ball ^ Clubs 

AS ADOPTED BY THE NATIONAL LEAGUE AND AMERICAN 
ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



THE BALL GROUND. 

■LE I. The Ground must be an inclosed field, sufficient 

redVS^ruLV'^^^^ '^ ^'^^ '- ''^ p-^^- - 

DlJ'nff\i^^r °^' ^1^^ ^'''^^ governing the positions 
p^ay off the Game known as Base Ball, proceed as 

;?otrt^^' ^^'^}^'^ *^^ grounds project a right line 

T lines B C an^'dV n^ T^-^l?' '^^'^^' ^^'^^^ P-^t Z 
UM h R -^ ^ ^^^ B P at right angles to the line A B- 
a:t?n^ fL'T "^^^'^a^^-^I^'^^ feet as radius, describe 
iittmg tlie hnes B A at F and B C at G • B D at H • 
3 E at I Draw lines F G, G E. E H aAd H F and 
.nes will be the containing linek of the Diamond or 

THE catcher's LINES. 

^^fne JTJ^ ^' ""T^"^ ^^^ 90 feet radius, an arc 
? to PA }" ^'1^ ^^^'"'^ ^"^^^ L M and L O at right 
;o feet ' ''''"^'''"^ -'^^^ ^^^ ^^^"^ ^ A not iSs 

THE FOUL LINE. 

r M „ 1 T Y , ^ " """' they intersect with the 
L M and L I, and then from the points G and H in 
gronndf''"™ ""'" they reach t^e bottndary Hnes 

THE player's. LINES. 

E 5. With Fas centre and 50 feet radius describe 
ittmg Imes F O and E M at P and O then with P.! 

T^t^L^'^t ^"^J^"-^ descr:be^arcs\"utling FG 
iic o. •^u'! ^' J^^^ ^^°^ the points P Q R and S 
ses at right angles to the lines F O, F M, F G and 



134 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

F H, and continue same until they intersect at the points 
T W and W. 

THE CAPTAIN AND COACHER's LINE. 

Rule 6 With R and S as centres and 15 feet radius, 
describe arcs cutting- lines R W and ST at X and Y, and 
from the points X and Y draw lines parallel with lines F H 
and F G, and continue same out to the boundary lines ol 
the ground. 

THE THREE FOOT LINE. 

Rule 7. With F as centre and 45 feet radius, describe an 
arc cutting; line F G at i, and from point i out to the dis- 
tance of three feet draw a line at right angles to F G and 
marked point 2 ; then from point 2, draw a line parallel with 
the line F G to a point three feet beyond the point G, and 
marked 3 ; then from the point 3 draw a line at right angles 
to line 2, 3, back to and intersecting with line F G and 
from thence back along line G F to point i. 

THE pitcher's PLATE. 

Rule 8. With point F as centre and 60.5 feet as radius, 
describe an arc cutting the line F B at a point 4, and draw 
a line 5, 6, passing through point 4 and extending six inches 
on either side of line F B; then with line 5, 6 as a side, 
describe a parallelogram twelve inches by four inches. 

THE bases. 

Rule 9. Within the angle F, describe a square the 
sides of which shall be 12 inches, two of its sides lying upon 
the lines F G and F H, and within the angles G and H 
describe squares the side of which shall be 15 inches, the 
two outer sides of said square lying upon the lines F G 
and G I and F H and H I, and at the angle E describe 
a square whose side shall be 15 inches and so described that 
its sides shall be parallel with G 1 and I H and its centre 
immediately over the angular point E. 

THE batman's LINE. 

Rule 10. On either side of the line A F B describe two 
parallelograms 6 feet long and 4 feet wide (marked S and 
9), their length being parallel with the line A F B, their 
distance apart being 6 inches added to each end of the 
length of the diagonal of the square within the angle F, and 
the centre of their length being upon said diagonal. 

Rule ii. The Home Base at F and the Pitcher's Plate 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 135 

at 4 must be of whitened rubber and so fixed in the ground 
as to be even with the surface. 

Rule 12. The First Base at G, the Second Base at E, 
and the Third Base at H, must be of white canvas bags 
filled with soft material and securely fastened in their 
positions described in Rule 9. 

Rule 13. The lines described in Rules 3, a, 5, 6, 7 and 
10 must be marked with lime, chalk, or other suitable 
material so as to be distinctly seen by the Umpire. 

THE BALL. 

Rule 14. The Ball:* See Foot Note. 

Sec. I. Must not weigh less than five or more than five 
and one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not less 
than nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches in 
circumference. The Spalding League Ball, or the Reach 
American Association Ball must be used in all games played 
under these rules. 

Sec. 2. For each championship game two balls shall be 
furnished by the Home Club to the Umpire for use. When 
the ball in play is batted to foul ground out of sight of the 
Umpire, the other ball shall be immediately brought into 
play. As often as one of the two in use shall be lost, a new 
one must be substituted, so that the Umpire shall at all 
times after the game begins, have two balls for use. The 
moment the Umpire delivers an alternate ball to the pitcher 
it comes into play, and shall not be exchanged until it, in 
turn, passes out of sight to foul ground. At no time shall 
the ball be intentionally discolored by rubbing it with the 
soil or otherwise. 

Sec. 3. In all games the ball or balls played with shall 
be furnished by the Home Club, and the last ball in play 
becomes the property of the winning club. Each ball to be 
used in championship games shall be examined, measured 
and weighed by the Secretary of the Association, inclosed 
in a paper box and sealed with the seal of the Secretary, 
which seal shall not be broken except by the Umpire in the 
presence of the Captains of the two contesting nines after 
play has been called. 

Sec. 4. Should the ball become out of shape, or cut or 
ripped so as to expose the interior, or in any way so injured 

*The Spalding League Ball has been adopted by the National League 
for the past fifteen years, and is used in all League contests. 

For junior clubs (clubs composed of boys under 16 years of age) we 
recommend them to use the Spalding Boys' League Ball and that games 
played by junior clubs with this ball will count as legal games the same as 
if played with the Official League Ball. 



130 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

as to be — in the opinion of the Umpire — unfit for fair use, 
he shall, upon appeal by either Captain, at once put the 
alternate ball into play and call for a new one. 

THE BAT. 

Rule 15. The Bat: 

Must be made wholly of hard wood except that the handle 
maybe wound with twine, or a granulated substance applied, 
not to exceed eighteen inches from the end. 

It must be round, not exceed two and one-half inches in 
diameter in the thickest part, and must not exceed forty-two 
inches in length. 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Rule 16. The players of each club in a game shall be 
nine in number, one of whom shall act as Captain, and in no 
case shall less than nmemen be allowed to play on each side. 

Rule 17. The players' positions shall be such as may be 
assigned them by their Captain, except that the Pitcher 
must take the position as defined in Rules 8 and 20. 

Rule 18. Players in uniform shall not be permitted to 
occupy seats among the Spectators. 

Rule 19. Every Club shall adopt luiiforms for its players, 
but no player shall attach anything to the sole or heel of his 
shoes other than the ordinary base ball shoe plate. 

players' benches. 

Rule 20. The Players' Benches must be furnished by the 
Home Club, and placed upon a portion of the ground outside 
of, and not nearer than twenty-five feet to, the Players' 
Lines. One such bench must be for the exclusive use of 
the visiting club and one for the exclusive use of the home 
club, and the players of the competing teams shall be 
required to occupy their respective benches during the prog- 
ress of the game. 

THE game. 

Rule 21. Section i. Every Championship Game must 
be commenced not later than two hours before sunset. 

Sec. 2. A Game shall consist of nine innings to each con- 
testing nine, except that 

(a) If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine innings 
than the other side has scored in eight innings, the game 
shall then terminate. 

(b) If the side last at bat in the ninth innings scores the 
winning run before the third man is out, the game shall 
terminate. 



BASE BALI. GUIDE. 1 37 

A TIE GAME. 

Rule 22. If the score be a tie at the end of nine innings, 
play shall be continued until one side has scored more runs 
than the other in an equal number of innings, provided that 
if the side last at bat scores the winning run before the 
third man is out, the game shall terminate. 

, A DRAWN game. 

Rule 23. A Drawn Game shall be declared by the 
Umpire w^hen he terminates a game on account of darkness 
or rain, after five equal innings have been played, if the score 
at the tmie is equal on the last even innings played ; but 
(exception) if the side that went second to bat is then at the 
bat, and has scored the same number .of runs as the other 
side, the Umpire shall declare the game drawn without 
regard to the score of the last equal innings. 

A called game. 
Rule 24. If the Umpire calls "Game" on account of 
darkness or rain at any time after five innings have been 
completed, the score shall be that of the last equal innings 
played, unless the side second at bat shall have scored one 
or more runs than the side first at bat, in which case the 
score of the game shall be the total number of runs made. 

A forfeited game. 

Rule 25. A forfeited game shall be declared by the 
Umpire in favor of the club not m fault, at the request of 
such club, in the following cases: 

Section i. If the nine of a club fail to appear upon a 
field, or being upon the field fail to begin the game wnthin 
five minutes after the Umpire has called "Play," at the 
hour appointed for the beginning of the game, unless such 
delay in appearing or in commencing the game be unavoid- 
able. 

Sec. 2, If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or 
fails to continue playing, unless such game has been sus- 
pended or terminated by the Umpire. 

Sec. 3. If, after play has been suspended by the Umpire, 
one side fails to resume playing within one inimite after the 
Umpire has called " Play." 

Sec. 4. If a team resorts to dilatory practice to delay the 
game. 

Sec. 5^ If, in the opinion of the Umpire, anyone of these 
rules is wilfully violated. 

Sfec. 6. If, after ordering the removal of a player as 
authorized by Rule 59, Sec. 5, said order is not obeyed 
within five minutes. 



138 Spalding's official 

Sec. 7. In case the Umpire declares a game forfeited, 
he shall transmit a written notice thereof to the President 
of the Association within twenty-four hours thereafter. 

NO GAME. 

Rule 26. " No Game" shall be declared by the Umpire 
if he shall terminate play on account of rain or darkness, 
before five innmgs on each side are completed, except in a* 
case when the game is called, the club second at bat shall 
have more runs at the end of its fourth innings than the club 
first at bat has made in its five innings, then the Um.pire 
shall award the game to the club having made the greatest 
number of runs, and it shall be a game and be so counted 
in the Championship record. 

SUBSTITUTES. 

Rule 27. Section i. In every championship game each 
team shall be required to have present on the field, m uni- 
form, one or more substitute players. 

Sec. 2. Any such player may be substituted at any time 
by either club, but no player thereby retired shall there- 
after participate in the game. 

Sec. 3. The Base Runner shall not have a substitute run 
for him except by consent of the Captains of the contesting 
teams. 

choice of innings — CONDITION OF GROUND. 

Rule 28. The choice of innings shall be given to the 
Captain of the Home Club, who shall also be the sole judge 
of the fitness of the ground for beginning a game after rain. 

THE pitcher's POSITION. 

Rule 29. The pitcher shall take his position facing the 
batsman with both feet square on the ground, and in front 
of the pitcher's plate, but in the act of delivering the ball 
one foot must be in contact with the pitcher's plate defined 
in Rule 8. He shall not raise either foot, unless in the act 
of delivering the ball, nor make more than one step in such 
delivery. He shall hold the ball, before the delivery fairly 
in front of his body, and in sight of the Umpire. When the 
pitcher feigns to throw the ball to a base he must resume 
the above position and pause momentarily before delivering 
the ball to the bat. 

THE DELIVERY OF THE BALL — FAIR AND UNFAIR BA'.LS. 

Rule 30. A Fair Ball is a ball delivered by the pitcher 
while standing in his position, and facing the Batsman, the 
ball so delivered, to pass over the Home Base, not lower 
than the Batsman's knee, nor higher than his shoulder. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 1 39 

Rule 31. An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered by the Pitcher, 
as in Rule 30, except that the ball does not pass over the 
Home Base, or does pass over the Home Base above the 
Batsman's shoulder or below the knee. 

BALKING. 

Rule 32. A Balk shall be 

Section i. Any motion made by the Pitcher to deliver 
the ball to the bat without delivering it. 

Sec. 2. The holding of the ball by the pitcher so long as 
to delay the game unnecessarily. 

Sec. 3. Any motion in delivering the ball to the bat by 
the Pitcher while not in the position defined in Rule 29. 

DEAD BALLS. 

Rule 33. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by 
the Pitcher that touches any part of the Batsman's person 
or clothing while standing in his position without bemg 
struck at; or any part of the Umpire's person or clothing, 
while on foul ground, without first passing the Catcher, 

Rule 34. In case of a Foul Strike, Foul Hit ball not 
legally caught out, Dead Ball, or Base Runner put out for 
being struck by a fair hit ball, the ball shall not be con- 
sidered in play until it is held by the pitcher standing in 
his position. 

block balls. 

Rule 35. Section i. A Block is a batted or thrown ball 
that is stopped or handled by any person not engaged in 
the game. 

Sec. 2. Whenever a Block occurs the Umpire shall 
declare it, and Base Runners may run the bases without 
being put out until the ball has been returned to and held 
by the pitcher standing i ti his position. 

Sec. 3. In the case of a Block, if the person not engaged 
in the game should ret lin possession of the ball, or throw 
or kick it beyond the reach of the Fielders, the Umpire 
should call " Time," and require each Base Runner to stop 
at the last base touched by him until the ball be returned 
to the pitcher standing in his position. 

the batsman's position — ORDER OF BATTING. 

Rule 36. The batsmen must take their positions within 
the Batsmen's Lines, as defined in Rule 10, in the order in 
which they are named in the batting order, which batting 
order must be submitted by the Captains of the opposing 
teams to the Um.pire before the game, and when approved 



I40 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

by him this batting order must be followed except in the 
case of a substitute player, in which case the substitute 
must take the place of the original player in the batting 
order. After the first inning the first striker in each inning 
shall be the batsman whose name follows that of the last 
man who has completed his turn — time at bat — in the pre- 
ceding inning. 

Rule 37. Section i. When their side goes to the bat 
the players must immediately return to the players' bench 
as defined in Rule 20, and remain there until the side is put 
out, except when batsmen or base runner; provided that 
the Captain and one assistant only may occupy the space 
between the Players' Lines and the Captain's Lines to coach 
base runners. 

Sec. 2. No player of the side at bat, except when bats- 
man, shall occupy any portion of the space within the 
Catcher's Lines, as defined in Rule 6. The triangular space 
behind the Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use of 
Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and the Umpire must pro- 
hibit any player of the side ' ' at bat ' ' from crossing the same 
at any time while the ball is in the hands of, or passing 
between the Pitcher and Catcher, '^vhile standing in their 
positions. 

Sec. 3. The players of the side "at bat" must occupy 
the portion of the field allotted them, but must speedily 
vacate any portion thereof that may be in the way of the 
ball, or any Fielder attempting to catch or field it. 

THE BATTING RULES. 

Rule 38. A Fair hit is a ball batted by the batsman, 
standing in his position, that first touches any ])art of the 
person of a player or umpire or falls within the foul lines, that 
(whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or 
rolls within the Foul Lines, between Home and First, or 
Home and Third Bases, without interference by a player. 

Rule 39, A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the Batsman, 
standing in his position, that first touches the ground, any 
part of the person of a player, or any object behind either 
of the Foul Lines, or that strikes the person of such l^ats- 
man, while standing in his position, or batted directly to 
the ground by the Batsman, standing in his position, that 
^whether it first touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or 
roils outside the Foul Lines, between Home and First or 
Home and Third Bases without interference by a i3layer. 
Provided, that a Foul Hit ball not rising above the l^ats- 
man's head, and caught by the Catcher playing within ten 
feet of the Home Base, shall be termed a Foul Tip. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. I4I 

Rule 40. A bunt hit is a fair hit to the ground within 
the infield. 

BALLS BATTED OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS. 

Rule 41. When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, 
the Umpire shall decide it Fair should it disappear within, 
or Foul should it disappear outside of, the range of the Foul 
Lines, and Rules 38 and 39 are to be construed accordingly. 

Rule 42. A Fair Batted ball that goes over the fence 
shall entitle the batsman to a home run, except that should 
it go over the fence at a less distance than two hundred and 
thirty-five feet from the Home Base, when he shall be 
entitled to two bases only, and a distinctive line shall be 
marked on the fence at this point.- 

STRIKES. 

Rule 43, A strike is 

Section i. A ball struck at by the Batsman without its 
touching his bat ; or 

Sec. 2. A Fair Ball legally delivered by the Pitcher, but 
not struck at by the Batsm.an. 

Sec. 3. Any obvious attempt to make a Foul Hit. 

Sec. 4. A foul hit, other than a foul tip, made by the 
batsman while attempting a bunt hit, as defined in Rule 40, 
that falls or rolls upon foul ground between home base 
and first base or home base and third base. 

Sec. 5 . A ball struck at, if the ball touches any j^art of 
the batsman's person. 

Rule 44. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the Batsman 
when any part of his person is upon ground outside the 
lines of the Batsman's position. 

THE BATSMAN IS OUT. 

Rule 45. The Batsman is out: 

Section i. If he fails to take his position at the bat in 
his order of batting, unless the error be discovered and the 
proper Batsman takes his position before a fair hit has been 
made ; and in such case the balls and strikes called must be 
counted in the time at bat of the proper batsman. Pro- 
vided, this rule shall not take effect unless the out is 
declared before the ball is delivered to the succeeding 
Batsman. 

Sec. 2. If he fails to take his position within one minute 
after the Umpire has called for the Batsman, 

Sec. 3. If he makes a Foul Hit other than a Foul Tip as 
defined in Rule 39, and the ball be momentarily held by a 
Fielder before touching the ground, provided it be not caught 



142 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than a 
Fielder, before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If he makes a Foul Strike. 

Sec. 5. If he attempts to hinder the Catcher from fielding 
or throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of his 
l>osition, or otherwise obstructing or interfering with that 
player. 

Skc. 6. If, while the First Base be occupied by a base 
runner, three strikes be called on him by the Umpire, 
except when two men are already out. 

Sec. 7. If, after two strikes have been called the Batsman 
obviously attempts to make a foul hit, as in Section 3, Rule 

43- 

Sec. 8. If, while attempting a third strike the ball 
touches any part of the batsman's person, in which event 
base runners occupying bases shall return as prescribed in 
Section 5, Rule 43. 

Sec. 9. If he hits a fly ball that can be handled by an 
inlielder while first base is occupied with only one out. 

Sec. 10. If the third strike is called in accordance with 
Section 4, Rule 48. 

BASE RUNNING RULES. 

WHEN THE BATSMAN BECOMES A BASE RUNNER. 

Rule 46. The Batsman becomes a base runner: 

Section i. Instantly after he makes a Fair Hit. 

Sec. 2. Instantly after four balls have been called by the 
Umpire. 

Sec. 3. Instantly after three strikes have been declared 
by the Umpire 

Sec. 4. If. while he be a batsman without making an 
attempt to strike his person — excepting hands or forearm, 
which makes it a dead ball — or clothing be hit by a ball from 
the Pitcher, unless — m the opinion of the Umpire — he 
intentionally permits himself to be so hit. 

Sec. 5. Instantlv after an illegal delivery of a ball by the 
Pitcher. 

BASES TO BE TOUCHED. 

Rule 47. The Base Runner must touch each base in 
regular order, viz.. Fust. Second. Third and Home Bases; 
and when obliged to return (except on a foul hit) must 
retouch the base or ba.se in reverse order. He shall only be 
considered as holding a base after touching it, and shall 
then be entitled to hold such base until he has legally 
touched the next base in order. 01 has been legally forced 
U) vacate it for a succeeding Base Runner. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. I43 

ENTITLED TO BASES. 

Rule 48. The Base Runner shall be entitled, without 
being put out, to take the Base in the following cases. 

Section 1. If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire called 
four Balls. 

Sec. 2. If the Umpire awards a succeeding batsman a 
base on four balls, or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in 
case of an illegal delivery — as in Rule 46, Sec. 5 — and the 
Base Runner is thereby forced to vacate the base held by 
him. 

Sec. 3, If the Umpire calls a " balk." 

Sec. 4. If a ball , delivered by the Pitcher, pass the Catcher 
and touch the Umpire, or any fence or building within ninety 
feet of the Home Base. 

Sec. 5. If upon a fair hit the Ball strikes the person or 
clothing of the Umpire on fair ground. 

Sec. 6. If he be prevented from making a base by the 
obstruction of an adversary. 

Sec. 7. If the Fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his 
hat, or any part of his dress. 

RETURNING TO BASES. 

Rule 49. The Base Runner shall return to his Base, and 
shall be entitled to so return without being put out: 

Section i. If the umpire declares a li'oul Tip (as defined 
in 37) or any other Foul Hit not legally caught by a Fielder. 

Sec. 2. If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike. 

Sec. 3. If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, unless it be 
also the fourth Unfair Ball and he be thereby forced to take 
the next base, as provided in Rule 48, Sec. 2. 

Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the Umpire interferes 
with thg Catcher or he is struck by a ball thrown by the 
Catcher to intercept a Base Runner. 

Sec. 5. The Base Runner shall return to his base, if, 
while attempting a strike, the ball touches any part of the 
Batsman's person. 

when base runners are out. 

Rule 50. The Base Runner is out: 

Section i. If, after three strikes have been declared 
against him while Batsman, and the Catcher fail to catch 
the third strike ball, he plainly attempts to hinder the 
Catcher from fielding the ball. 

Sec. 2. If, having made a Fair Hit while Batsman, such 
fair hit ball be momentarily held by a Fielder, before touch- 
ing the ground, or any object other than a Fielder: Pro- 
vided, it be not caught in a Fielder's hat or cap. 



144 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

Sec. 3. If, when the Umpire has declared three strikes 
on him, while Batsman, the third strike ball be momentarily 
held by a Fielder before touching the ground: Provided, 
it be not caught in a Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some 
object other than a Fielder, before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, he be 
touched with the ball in the hand of a Fielder before he 
shall have touched First Base. 

Sec. 5. If, after Three Strikes or a Fair Hit, the ball be 
securely held by a Fielder, while touching First Base with 
any part of his person, before such Base Runner touches 
First Base. 

Sec, 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from 
Home Base to First Base, while the ball is being fielded to 
First P>ase, he runs outside the Three Feet Lines, as defined 
in Rule 10 unless to avoid a Fielder attempting to field a 
Batted Ball. 

Sec. 7. If, in running from First to Second Base, from 
Second to Third Base, or from Third to Home Base he runs 
more than three feet from a direct line between such bases 
to avoid being touched by the ball in the hands of a Fielder; 
but in case a Fielder be occupying the Base Runner's 
proper path, attempting to field a batted ball, then the 
Base Runner shall run out of the path, and behind said 
Fielder, and shall not be declared ovit for so doing. 

Sec. 8. If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, in the manner described in Sections 6 and 7 
of this Rule; or if he in any way obstructs a Fiekler 
attempting to field a batted ball, or intentionally interferes 
with a thrown ball: Provided, that if two or more Fielders 
attempt to field a batted ball, and the Base Runner comes 
in contact with one or more of them, the Umpire shall 
determine which Fielder is entitled to the beneli? of tlMS 
Rule, and shall not decide the Base Runner out for coming 
in contact with any other fielder. 

Sec. 9. If. at any time while the ball is in play, he be 
touchecl by the ball in the hands of a Fielder, unless some 
part of his person is touching a base he is entitled to occupy. 
Pro7iided, the ball be held by the Fielder after touching 
him; but (exception as to First Base), in running to First 
Base, he may overrun said base without being put out for 
being otT said base after first touching it. provided he 
returns at once and retouches the base, after which he may 
be put out a^^ at any other base. If, in overrunning First 
Base, he also attempts to run to second Base, or, after pass- 
ing the base he turns to his left from the foul line, he shall 
forfeit such exemption from being put out. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. I45 

Sec. 10. If, when a Fair or Foul Hit ball (other than a 
foul tip as referred torn Rule 36) is legally caught by a 
Fielder, such ball is legally held by a Fielder on the base 
occupied by the Base Runner when such ball was struck (or 
the Base Runner be touched with the ball in the hands of a 
Fielder), before he retouches said base after such Fair or 
Four Hit ball was so caught. Provided that the Base 
Runner shall not be out in such case, if, after the ball was 
legal I}' caught as above, it be delivered to the bat by the 
Pitcher before the Fielder holds it on said base, or touches 
the Base Runner with it ; but if the Base Runner in attempt- 
ing to reach a base, detaches it before being touched or 
forced out, he shall be declared safe. 

Sec. II, If, when a Batsman becomes a Base Runner, 
the First Base, or the First and Second Bases, or the First, 
Second and Third Bases, be occupied, any Base Runner so 
occupying- a base shall cease to be entitled to hold it, until 
any following Base Runner is put out, and may be put out 
at the next base or by being touched by the ball in the 
hands of a Fielder in the same manner as in running to 
First Base, at any time before any following Base Runner 
is put out. 

Sec. 12. If a Fair Hit ball strike him before touching the 
Fielder, and in such case no base shall be run unless forced 
by the Batsman becoming a Base Runner, and no run shall 
be scored ; or any other Base Runner put out. 

Sec. 13. If when running to a base or forced to return to 
a base, he fail to touch the intervening base or bases if 
any, in the order prescribed in Rule 47, he may be put out at 
the base he fails to touch, or by being touched by the ball 
in the hands of a Fielder, in the same manner as in running 
to First Base, 

Sec, 14, If when the Umpire calls " Play," after any sus- 
pension of a game he fails to return to and touch the base 
he occupied when " Time " was called before touching the 
next base. 

WHEN BATSMAN OR BASE RUNNER IS OUT, 

Rule 51. The Umpire shall declare the Batsman or Base 
Runner out, without waiting for an appeal for such decision, 
in all cases where such player is put out in accordance with 
these rules, except as provided in Rule 50, Sections 10 and 
14. 

coaching rules. 

Rule 52. The coachers are restricted to coaching the 
Base Runner only, and are not allowed to address any 



146 Spalding's official 

remarks except to the Base Runner, and then only in words 
of necessary direction ; and shall not use lani3:nage which 
will in any manner refer to or reflect upon a player of the 
opposing club, the umpire or the spectators, and not more 
than two coachers, who may be one player participating in 
the game and any other player under contract to it, iiL,the 
uniform of either club, shall be allowed at any one time. 
To enforce the above, the Captain of the opposite side may 
call the attention of the Umpire to the offence, and upon a 
repetition of the same, the offending player shall be debarred 
from further coaching during the game. 

THE SCORING OF RUNS. 

Rule 53. One run shall be scored every time a base 
runner, after having legally touched the first three bases, 
shall touch the Home Base before three men are put out by 
(exception). If the third man is forced out, or is put out 
before reaching First Base, a run shall not be scored. 

THE UMPIRE. 
Rule 54. The Umpire shall not be changed during the 
progress of a game, except for reason of illness or injury. 

HIS POWERS AND JURISDICTION. 

Rule 55. Section i. The Umpire is maste'- of the Field 
from the commencement to the termination of the game, 
and is entitled to the respect of the spectators, and any 
person offering any insult or indignity to him must be 
promptly ejected from the grounds. 

Sec. 2. He must be invariably addressed by the players 
as Mr. Umpire; and he must compel the players to observe 
the provisions of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby 
invested with authority to order any player to do or omit 
to do any act as he may deem necessary, to give force and 
effect to any and all of such provisions. 

SPECIAL duties. 

Rule 56. The Umpire's duties shall be as follows: 
Section i. The Umpire is the sole and absolute judge 
of play. In no instance shall any person except the Captain 
of the competing teams be allowed to address him or 
question his decisions and they can only question him on 
an interpretation of the Rules. No Manager or any other 
officer of either club shall be permitted to go on the iield or 
address the Umpire, under a penalty of a forfeiture of a 
game. 

Sec. 2. Before the commencement of a Game, the 
Umpire shall see that the rules governing all the materials 



BASE BALL GUIDE. I47 

of the game are strictly observed. He shall ask the Captain 
of the Home Club whether there are any special ground 
rules to be enforced, and if there are, he shall see that they 
are duly enforced, provided they do not conflict with any of 
these rules. 

Sec. 3. The Umpire must keep the contesting nines play- 
ing constantly from the commencement of the game to its 
termmation, allowing such delays only as are rendered 
unavoidable by accident, injury or rain. He must, until the 
completion of the game, require the players of each side to 
promptly take their positions in the field as soon as the third 
man is put out, and must require the first striker of the 
opposite side to be in his position at the bat as soon as the 
fielders' are in their places. 

Sfx. 4. The Umpire shall count and call every "unfair 
ball" delivered by the Pitcher, and every "dead ball," if 
also an unfair ball, as a "ball, "and he shall also count and 
call every "strike." Neither a "ball "nor a " strike" shall 
be counted or called until the ball has passed the Home 
Base. He shall also declare every " Dead Ball," " Block," 
" Foul Hit," " Foul Strike," and " Balk." 

CALLING "play" AND "TIME." 

Rule 57. The Umpire must call " Play " promptly at the 
hour designated by the Home Club, and on the call of 
" Play" the game must immediately begin. When he calls 
"Time" play shall be suspended until he calls "Play" 
again, and during the interim no player shall be put out, 
base be run or run be scored. The Umpire shall suspend 
play only for an accident to himself or a player (but in case 
of accident to a Fielder, "Time" shall not be called until 
the ball be returned to and held by the Pitcher, standing in 
his position), or in case rain lalls so heavily that the specta- 
tors are compelled, by the severity of the storm, to seek 
shelter, in which case he shall note the time of suspension, 
and should such rain continue to fall thirty minutes there- 
after, he shall terminate the game ; or to enforce order in 
case of annoyance from spectators. 

Rule 58. The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, to 
call " Time " in case of an accident to himself or a player, a 
" Block," as referred to in Rule 35, Sec. 3, or in case of rain, 
as defined by the Rule. 

INFLICTING FINES. 

Rule 59. The Umpire is empowered to inflict fines of 
not less than $5.00 nor more than $25.00 for the first offence 
on players during the progress of a game, as follows : 



148 Spalding's official 

Section i. For improper language addressed to a spec- 
tator, the Umpire, or any player. 

Sec. 2. For the Captain or Coacher wilfully failing to 
remain within the legal bounds of his position, except upon 
an appeal by the Captain from the U-mpire's decision upon 
a misinterpretation of the rules. 

Sec. 3. For the disobedience by a player of any other of 
his orders or for any other violation of these rules. 

Sec. 4. In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a player, 
he shall at once notify the Captain of the offending player's 
side, and shall transmit a written notice thereof to the 
President of the Association or League within twenty-four 
hours thereafter, under the penalty of having said fine taken 
from his own salary. 

Sec 5. The Umpire may remove a player for a violation 
of Section i of this Rule in lieu of a fine, but, under no cir- 
cumstances, shall he remove a player for a violation of Sec- 
tion 2 of this Rule, unless upon a repetition of the offence 
prescribed therein. 

FIELD RULES. 

Rule 60. No Club shall allow open betting or pool selling 
upon its ground, nor in any building owned or occupied by it. 

Rule 61. No person shall be allowed upon any part of 
the field during the progress of the game, in addition to the 
players in uniform, the ISIanager on each side and the 
Umpire; except such oi^cers of the law as may be present 
in uniform, and such officials of the Home Club as may be 
necessary to jireserve the peace. 

Rule 62. No Umpire, j\Ianager, Captain or player shall 
address the spectators during the progress of a game, except 
in case of necessary explanation. 

Rule 63. Every Club shall furnish sufficient police force 
upon its own grounds to preserve order, and in the event of 
a crowd entering the field during the progress of a game, 
and interfering with the play in any manner, the Visiting 
Club may refuse to play further until the field be cleared. 
If the ground be not cleared within fifteen minutes there- 
after, the Visiting Club may claim, and shall be entitled to, 
the game by a score of nine runs to none (no matter what 
number of innings have been played). 

general definitions. 

Rule 64. "Play" is the order of the Umpire to begin 
the game, or to resume play after its suspension. 
Rule 65. ' Time " is the order of the Umpire to suspend 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 149 

play. Such suspension must not extend beyond the day of 
the game. 

Rule 66. " Game" is the announcement by the Umpire 
that the game is terminated. 

Rule 67. "An Inning " is the term at bat of the nine 
players representing a Club in a game, and is completed 
when three of such players have been put out as provided 
in these rules. 

Rule 68. "A Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a Bats- 
man. It begins when he takes his position, and continues 
until he is put out or becomes a base runner ; except when 
because of being hit by a pitched ball, or in case of an 
illegal delivery by the Pitcher, or -in case of a sacrifice hit 
purposely made to the infield which, not being a base hit, 
advances a base runner without resulting in a put out, 
except to the Batsman as in Rule 46. 

Rule 6g. "Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required 
by these Rules. 



Rule 70. In order to promote uniformit}^ in scoring 
Championship Games the following instructions, suggest- 
ions and definitions are made for the benefit of scorers,"^ and 
they are required to make all scores in accordance therewith. 



Section i. The first item in the tabulated score, after 
the player's name and position, shall be the number of 
times he has been at bat during game. The time or times 
when the player has been sent to base by being hit by a 
pitched ball, by the Pitcher's illegal delivery, or by a base 
on balls, shall not be included in this column. 

Sec. 2. In the second column should be set down the 
runs made by each player. 

Sec. 3. In the third column should be placed the first 
base hits made by each player. A base hit should be 
scored in the following cases: 

When the Ball from the bat strikes the ground within the 
foul lines, and out of reach of the Fielders. 

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a Fielder 
in motion, but such player cannot recover hmiself in tmie 
to handle the ball before the striker reaches First Base. 

When a hit ball is hit so sharply to an infielder that he 
cannot handle it in time to put out the Batsman. In case of 
doubt over this class cf hits, score a base hit, and exempt 
the Fielder from the charge of an cn^or. 



150 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

When a ball is hit so slowly toward a Fielder that he can- 
not handle it in time to put out the Batsman. 

That m all cases where a Base Runner is retired by- 
being hit by a batted ball, the Batsman should be credited 
with a base hit. 

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the 
Umpire, as defined in Rule 39. 

Sec. 4. In the fourth column shall be placed Sacrifice 
hits, which shall be credited to the Batsman, who, when no 
one is out. or when but one man is out, advances a runner a 
base by a bunt sacrifice hit, which results in putting out the 
Batsman, or would so result if the ball were handled without 
error. 



Sec. 5. The number of opponents put out by each player 
shall be set down in the fifth column. Where a batsman is 
given out by the Umpire for a foul strike, or where the 
Batsman fails to bat in proper order, the put out shall be 
scored to the Catcher. 

Sec. 6. The number of times the player assists shall be 
set down in the sixth column. An assist should be given to 
each player who handles the ball in assisting a run out or 
other play of the kind. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play 
in time to put a runner out, even if the player who could 
complete the play fails, through no fault of the player 
assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player 
who handles or assists in any manner m handling the ball 
from the time it leave:^ the bat until it reaches tlie player 
who makes the put out, or in case of a thrown ball, to each 
jilayer who throws or handles it cleanly, and in such a way 
that a put out results, or would result if no error were made 
by the receiver. 



Sec. 7. An error shall be given in the seventh column 
for each misplay which allows the striker or base runner to 
make one or more bases when perfect play would have 
insured his being put out, except that "wild pitches," 
" base on balls," bases on the batsman being struck by a 
"pitched ball," or in case of illegal pitched balls, balks and 
passed balls, shall not be included in said column. In scor- 
ing errors of batted balls see Section 3 of this Rule. 



RASE BALL GUIDE. I5I 

STOLEN BASES. 

Sec. 8. Stolen bases shall be scored as follows : 
Any attempt to steal a base must go to the credit of the base 
runner, whether the ball is thrown wild or muffed by the 
fielde*, but any manifest error is to be charged to the fielder 
making the same. If the base runner advances another 
base he shall not be credited with a stolen base, and the 
fielder allowing the advancement is also to be charged with 
an error. If a base runner makes a start and a battery 
error is made, the runner secures the credit of a stolen base, 
and the battery error is scored against the player making 
it. Should a base runner overrun a base and then be put 
out, he shall receive the credit for the stolen base. If a 
Base Runner advances a base on a fly out, or gains two 
bases on a single base hit, or an infield out, or attempted 
out, he shall be credited with a stolen base, provided there 
is a possible chance and a palpable attempt made to retire 
him. 

EARNED RUNS. 

Sec. 9. An earned run shall be scored every time the 
player reaches the home base unaided by errors before 
chances have been offered to retire the side. 

THE SUMMARY. 

RuiEyi. The Summary shall contain : 

Section i. The number of earned runs made by each 
side. 

Sec. 2. The number of two-base hits made l)y each 
player. 

Sec. 3. The number of three-base hits made by each 
player. 

Sec. 4. The number of home runs made by each player. 

Sec. 5. The number of bases stolen by each player. 

Sec. 6. The number of double and triple plays made by 
each side, and the names of the players assisting in the same. 

Sec. 7. The number of men given bases on called balls 
by each Pitcher. 

Sec. 8. The number of men given bases from being hit 
by pitched balls. 

Sec. 9. The number of men struck out. 

Sec. 10. The number of passed balls by each Catcher. 

Sec. II. The number of wild pUches by each Pitcher. 

^^.c. 12. The time of game. 

Sec. 13. The name of the Umpire. 



152 SPALDING S OFFICIAL 

EXPLANATORY APPENDIX. 

The new code of rules for 1S94 requires but a page or two 
of explanation, as the changes made which were of any 
special importance, were few and far between. The dia- 
gram of the diamond field needs a surveyor to lay it out so 
that it might be made comprehensible to amateurs and 
novices in the game. What with its "arcs" and its 
" radiuses" and its algebraic style of description, it is likely 
to be a Greek puzzle to foreign votaries of the game. 

The only important changes made are the penalizing of 
bunted foul balls by calling them strikes; thepreventing of 
a double play when a runner has secured first base, and the 
succeeding batsman pops up an infield fly ball; the calling 
of a strike on every pitched ball which hits the batsman 
after he has struck at it and missed it, and the limiting of 
sacrifice hits to those made on balls sent to the infield only. 
The other changes are so-called improved wording of some 
of the rules. The failures in improving the code include 
that of refusing to give team-work batsmen the credit due 
them for forwarding runners by base hits; the not enlarg- 
ing the pitcher's box so as to admit of his getting a good 
foot hold within the box, and not as now outside of it and 
outside of the front line of the pitcher's position, and 
the refusal to define runs earned off the pitching as runs 
scored from base hits only, and not from a combination of 
base hits' and stolen bases, thereby charging the pitcher 
with runs earned off his pitching, which were partly earned 
off the fielding. 

The amended rule relative to sacrifice hits is as follows: 
Rule 70 — new — Section 4, reads as follows: "In the fourth 
column Cof the tabulated score) shall be placed sacrifice 
hits which .shall be credited to the batsman, who, when no 
one is out, or when but one man is out, advances a runner 
a base by a bunt sacrifice hit which results in putting out 
the batsman, or would so result if the ball be handled with- 
out error." 

Every sacrifice hit resulting from a hit to the infield — but 
not from a fly ball to the out field — is rewarded by the 
batsman not being charged, in such case, with a time at the 
bat. This is described in the amended Rule 6S. This is 
about all of the important changes made in the rules. 
Some are improvements, but much in that way has been 
left undone. 

Henkv Chadwick. 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



The Ground i 

The Field 2 

Catcher' s Lines 3 

Foul Lines 4 

Player s Lines 5 

The Captain's and Catcher's Lines 6 

Three Feet Lines 7 

Pitcher's Plate 8 

The Bases 9 

Batsman's Lines 10 

The Home Base 11 

First. Second and Third Bases = . 12 

Lines must be Marked : 13 

The Ball 14 

Weight and Size (0 i4 

Number Balls Furnished (2) 14 

Furnished by Home Club (3) i4 

Replaced if Injured (4) i4 

The Bat 15 

Material of (i) 15 

Shape of. (2) 15 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Number of Players in Game. . . 16 

Players' Positions 17 

Players not to Sit with Spectators 18 

Club Uniforms 19 

Players' Benches 20 

THE GAME. 

Time of Championship Game .(0 21 

Number of Innings (2) 21 

Termination of Game (a) 21 

The Winning Run (b) 21 

A Tie Game 22 

A D raw Game ... 23 

A Called Game 24 

A Forfeited Game 25 

Failure of the Nine to Appear (i) 25 

Refusal of One Side to Play (2) 2f 

Failure to Resume Playing (3) 25, 

If a Tea n Resorts to Dilatory Practice (4) 25 

Wilful Violation (5) 25 

Disobeying Order to Remove Player ((>) 25 

Written Notice to President. . (7) 25 

No Game .....". . 26 

Substitutes 27 



One or more Substitute Players (i) 27 

Extra Player (2) 27 

Base Runner (3) 27 

Choice of Innings — Condition of Grounds 28 

The Pitcher's Position 29 

Delivery of the Ball — Fair Ball 30 

Unfair Ball 31 

Balking 32 

Motion to Deceive (1) 32 

Delay by Holding (2) 32 

Pitcher Outside of Lines (3) 32 

A Dead Ball 33 

A Foul Strike 34 

Block Balls 35 

Stopped by Person not in Game (i) 35 

Ball Returned (2) 35 

Base Runner must Stop (3) 35 

The Batsman's Position — Order of Batting 36 

Where Players must Remain (i) 37 

Space Reserved for Umpire (2) 37 

Space Allotted Players " at Bat " (3) 37 

Batting Rules— Fair Hit 38 

Foul Hit 39 

Bunt Hit 40 

Batted Ball Outside Grounds 41 

A Fair Batted Ball 42 

Strikes 43 

Ball Struck at by Batsman (i) ^3 

Fair Ball Delivered by Pitcher (2) 43 

Attempt to Make Foul Hit (3) 43 

Foul Hit while Attempting a Bunt Hit (4) 43 

Ball Struck at after Touching Batsman's 

Person (5) 43 

A Foul Strike 44 

The Batsm.an is Out 45 

Failing to Take Position at Bat in Order (i) 45 

Failure to Take Position within One Minute after 

being Called (2) 45 

If He Makes a Foul Hit (3) 45 

If He Makes a Foul Strike (4) 45 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher (5) 45 

Three Strikes Called by Umpire (6) 45 

Attempt to Make a Foul Hit After Two Strikes 

have been Called (7) 45 

If Ball Hits Him While Making Third Strike (8) 45 
If He Hits a Fly Ball that can be Handled by 
Infielder while First Base Occupied with Only 

One Out (q) 45 

If Third Strike is Called (10^ 45 



BASE RUNNING RULES. rulk. 

The Batsman Becomes a Base Runner , 46 

After a Fair Hit (i) 46 

After Four Balls are Called (2) 46 

After Three Strikes are Declared (3) 46 

If Hit by Ball While at Bat (4) 46 

After Illegal Delivery of Ball (5) 46 

Bases to be Touched 47 

Entitled to Bases . . ; 48 

If Umpire Call Four Balls (i) 48 

If Umpire Award Succeeding Batsman Base. .(2) 48 

If Umpire Calls Balk (3) 48 

If Pitcher's Ball Passes Catcher (4) 48 

Ball Strikes Umpire (5) 48 

Prevented from Making Base (6) 48 

Fielder Stops Ball ' (7) 48 

Returning to Bases 49 

If Foul Tip (I) 49 

If Foul Stroke (2) 49 

If Dead Ball (3) 49 

If Person of Umpire Interferes with Catcher. .(4) 49 

If the Ball Touches the Batsman's Person . . . .(5) 49 

Base Runner Out 50 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher from Fielding Ball ( i ) 50 

If Fielder Hold Fair Hit Ball (2) 50 

Third Strike Ball Held by Fielder (3) 50 

Touched with Ball after Three Strikes (4) 50 

Touching First Base (5) 50 

Running from Home Base to First Base (6) 50 

Running from First to Second Base (7) 50 

Failure to Avoid Fielder (8) 50 

Touched by Ball While in Play (9) 50 

Fair or Foul Hit Caught by Fielder (lo) 50 

Batsman Becomes a Base Runner (11) 50 

Touched by Hit Ball Before Touching Fielder(r2) 50 

Running to Base (13) 50 

Umpire Calls Play (14) 50 

When Batsman or Base Runner is Out 51 

Coaching Rules 52 

Scoring of Runs 53 

THE UMPIRE. 

The Umpire 54 

When Master of the Field (i) 55 

Must Compel Observance of Playing Rules (2) 55 

.Special Duties 56 

Is Sole Judge of Play (i) 56 

Shall See Rules Observed before Commencing 

Game , . .(2) 56 



Must Keep Contesting Nines Playing (-) 56 

Must Countand Call Balls (4) 56 

Umpire Must Call Play 57 

Umpire Allowed to Call Time 5S 

Umpire is Empowered to Inflict Fines 59 

For Indecent Language (i) 59 

Wilful Failure of Captain to Remain wilhin 

Bounds (2) 59 

Disobedience of a Player (3) 59 

Shall Notify Captain (4) 59 

Repetition of Offences (5) 59 

FIELD RULES. 

No Club Shall Allow Open Betting 60 

Who Shall be Allowed in the Field 61 

Audience Shall Not be Addressed 62 

Every Club Shall Furnish Police Force 63 

GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

Play 64 

Time '. 65 

Game 66 

An Inning 67 

A Time at Bat 63 

Legal 6g 

Scoring 70 

Batting (i) 70 

Runs Made ! (2) 70 

Base Hits (3) 70 

Sacrifice Hits (4) 70 

Fielding (5) 70 

Assists (6) 70 

Errors (7) 70 

Stolen Bases (S) 70 

Earned Runs (9) 70 

The Summary 71 

Number of Earned Runs (i) 71 

Number of Two Base Hits (2) 71 

Number of Three Base Hits . .(3) 71 

Number of Home Runs (4) 71 

Number of Stolen Bases (5) 71 

Niimber of Double and Triple Games (6) 71 

Bases on Called Balls (7) 71 

Bases from being Hit (8) 71 

Men Struck Out (g) 71 

Passed Balls (10) 71 

Wild Pitches (11) 71 

Time of Game (12) 71 

Name oi Umpire , (13) 71 



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62 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



THE MINOR LEAGUES OF 1893. 

THE EASTERN LEAGUE RECORD. 

The past year was not a very successful one for the 
majority of the minor League organizations of 1893. But 
two of them, in fact, were out of the list of failures to any 
marked extent, and those two were the Eastern League and 
the New England League. The very able management of 
the Eastern League by President Powers was a potent 
factor in bringing about the League's exceptional success. 

The League's championship race was towards the close 
the most exciting of any in the country, and had the most 
remarkable finish, as it was not until within one day of the 
close of the schedule that first and second places were con- 
clusively settled. 



Clubs. 



Erie 

Springfield. 

rroy 

Buri'alo . . . . 











*f 


a 


1 






^ 


^ 


<i^ 


63 


41 


.606 


61 


43 


.587, 


66 


49 


.574 


lei 


53 


.5351 



Clubs. 



Bingharuton ]48 

Albany 53 

Providence 44 

Wilkesbarre 40 



.465 
.389 
.381 



The record, with the club names given in alphabetical 
order, is as follows : 



Clubs. 



Albany 

Bingliainton. 

Builalo 

Erie. 



a 
So 

--1 



9 
10 

Providence J 

Springfield 11 

Trov 1^ 

Wilkesbarre i 5 



Lost |61 55 53 41 



43 49 65 436 



.465 
.466 
.535 



,687 
574 
,381 



The pennant race ended September 15th with Erie as the 
pennant winner, after one of the hottest finishes ever wit- 
nessed. Springfield ended a close second. Troy, which at 
one time made a runaway race and led by nearly one hun- 
dred points, had to be content at the finish with third place. 
Buffalo is a comfortable fourth. Bmghamton, Albany. 
Providence and Wilkesbarre finished in the order named. 
Erie won every series but three, broke even on two of them 
and lost one. Springfield won every series but two, break- 
ing even on one and losing one, while Troy won every series 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



163 



but one and broke even on that. It is interesting to note 
that Springfield won the series with Erie and lost the series 
to Troy, but finished behind the former and ahead of the 
latter. Troy and Erie broke even in their series. Buffalo 
won three series, tied three and lost one. Binghamton won 
but two of the series with Providence, and Wilkesbarre tied 
one and lost four. Albany won two series, tied two and lost 
three. Providence lost every series and Wilkesbarre lost all 
but the series with Providence. 

The most successful minor League of 1893 was the well 
managed New England League, which was ably controlled 
by the well known base ball scribes of the Boston Globe 
and Herald, Messrs Murrane and Morse, the former having 
been elected president of the League for 1894. 

Below will be found the record for the season : 



Clubs. 


d 

1 

60 
56 
44 


3 

30 
37 
43 


1% 

.667 
.602 
.506 


Clubs. 


d 

1 

40 
30 
29 


1 

43 
51 

65 




Fall River 


Dover 




Lewiston 


Brockton ...!!.'.*!!!!! 


370 


Portland 


Boston Reds 


.345 



Clubs. 



Brockton . . . . 

Dover 

Fall River . . . 

Lewiston 

Boston Reds. 
Portland 



Lost 



d 

2 




> 


d 






i 




4 


5 


7 


8 


6 


30 


11 




2 


9 


10 


8 


40 


15 


13 




9 


11 


12 


60 


10 


11 


8 




15 


12 


56 


6 


5 


7 


6 




5 


29 


9 


10 


8 


6 


11 




44 


51 


43 


30 


37 


55 


43 


259 



.370 

.482 
.667 
.602 
.345 
.506 



The Southern League, which opened very promisingly in 
the Spring, was a failure, as it prematurely wound up its 
affairs on August 12th, when the last game was played. 
Macon was in the lead at the time and was declared the win- 
ner of the second season championship. Memphis led the 
teams of the western division when the League collapsed. 
Appended is the record to August 12th inclusive: 



Clubs. 



Macon 

Mempliis.... 

Mobile 

Chattanooga 

Atlanta 

NeTf Orleans 



Clubs. 



Savannah... 

Nashville 

Montgomery 
Charleston . . 
Pensacola .. 
Angusta . . . . 



7 22 



.517 
.448 
.387 



19 !821 



164 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



Clubs. 



Atlanta 

AugusUi 

Pensacola..., 
Charlesiou. . , 
Chattanooijca 

Macou , 

Mempliis 

Mobile 

Moiitjromery. 

Nashville 

New Orleans 
SaA'anuah 











■ 








t>^ 








4 


5 

1 


u 


1 



'6 




§ 


2 


^ 




s5 


a 

oS 



s 
> 


?: 


< 


< 




'J 


'^ 


S 


S 


s 


s 


sc 


2 


^ 


^ 




3 





3 


5 


2 

















4 


17 


3 







1 


1 




















2 


7 



















1 


2 


3 


2 


1 





9 


^ 


4 







1 




















1 


^i 


3 


5 





3 




2 

















3 


16' 


4 


6 





3 


4 



















4 


21' 








ft 













3 


5 


4 


3 





20 








4 











2 




6 


3 


3 





1^ 








3 











1 







4 


4 





12! 








4 











3 


2 


2 




2 





13, 








3 











3 


3 


3 


3 




0, 


15; 


2 


4 





4 


2 


3 

















1 


^^1 


14 


22 


19 


U 


13 


7 


10 


10 


19 


16 


13 


14; 


17l| 



The plan of a twelve-club League for minor organizations 
IS not a good one. Eight clubs at most should be the rule, 
leaving other clubs for State Leagues. 

We are mdebted to the courtesy of Mr J. J Ward, at 
Toronto, for the following mteresting account of the base 
ball position in Canada. 

The year 1893 was the greatest m the history of base ball 
in Canada, and its progress m public favor decided. 

As President of the Toronto Base Ball League of 1S92. I 
was asked by that body to call a convention in the city of 
Toronto, on April 3d. 1893, to form a Canadian amateur 
base ball association A council of ten from the different 
towns throughout the country was also elected. The fol- 
lowing was the standing of the different Leagues at the end 
of the season 

CENTRAL LEAGUE. 



Club. 



1 Dukes iT(jronto) 

2 Atliletics (Hamilton). 

3 Park Nine (Toronto). 
4|Victor.s (Hamilton) .. 



^ 




s 


c 


13 


5 


12 


5 


5 


12 


4 


13 



.722 



,294 
.235 



INTERIOR LEAGUE. 



1 Dundas... 

2 Gait 

SiCiuelpli 

4 lirautfonl 



8 5 .615 
7 5 .583 
1111.093 



Notb.— Dondas and Gait evea at end o( season and tiad to play oa, 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 
WESTERN LEAGUE, 



65 



11 Alerts (London) , 
2|stars(Loadop)., 



41 11.800 
1 41.200 



Note.— Stars disbanded and pennant awarded to Alerts. 

MIDLAND LEAGUE. 



Cobourg , , 
Lindsay .. 
Peterboro 
Osliawa . . 



.750 



.273 
.273 



TORONTO CITY JUNIOR LEAGUE. 



1 


VVellesley s 


12 


R 


ROO 


•^ 


Alerts 


11 4 

11 4 


733 


3 


Stars 


733 


4 


Elks 


7 
1 


8 
14 


4fi7 


5 


Crescents -. 




6 


Parkdale Juniors 


.067 





GALT JUNIOR LEAGUE. 




llUnions 




1 6! Oil 000 


21 Excelsior 




1 3I 31 500 


SIEurekas 




1 21 41 .333 


4| Bowerys 




1 ll 5! .167 



FINAL CANADIAN CHAMPIONSHIP. 

EASTERN SERIES. 



Date. 


Clubs. 


Played at. 


Sept.8 

Sept. 11 


Cobourg, 2 Toronto Dukes. 

Toronto Dukes, 5 Cobourg 4 


Cobourg. 
Toronto 


Sept. 14 


Cobourg, 12 Toronto Dukes, 7 


Lindsay. 



Cobourg winners. 

WESTERN SERIES. 



Date. 


Clubs. 




Played at. 


Sept. 16 


London Alerts, 20 

Loudon Alerts, 5 


Dundas, 

....Dundas, 4 




Sept. 23 


Dundas. 



London Alerts winners. 

FINAL SERIES. 



Sept. 27. 
Sept. 30. 
Oct. 7 . . . 



Cobourg, 8 London, 6 

Ijondon Alerts, 20 Cobourg, 11 

Cobourg, 10 London Alerts, 5 



Cobourg. 
London. 
Toronto. 



COBOURG CHAMPIONS OF CANADA. 

TORONTO, Can., Feb. 13th. 1894.— Ba.se ball clubs throughout Canada will 
again have the opportunity this year of battling for the Spalding pennants. 
Every club that won the trophy last sea.son promptly received its prize, and 
no doubt they will all be eager to capture another. 

The pennants will be exactly similar to those given last season— 11x28 
feet, pennant-shaped, made of serviceable white bunting, red-lettered and 
valued at $20, or smaller silk flags for juniors of the same value. 

The conditions are also the same, viz.: Each league must consist of four 
or more clubs, and each club must play not less than twelve championsiiip 
games. For example: In a four-club league, each team must meet each 
other team four or more times during the season. 



SIMPLE DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD 

as published in last year's Baseball Guide. 









Sd 



«^^ 



.^« 



♦ • 







^ ^, A -Ground reserved for Umpire. Patsman and Cai.<ib,^ 
B." B. Ground reseived for Captain and Assistant. 
C- Players' Bench. D -VisiUo« PUycr* B»i R«rt^ 
Cr-HobM PUycn' Bat Rock. 



For Roif)iitif»o T^JIt^X^V^ t^ ?Wr? '3* 




No. 7/0. 




SPALDINGS' CATCHERS' MITTS. 

No. 8/0. Spalding:'s " Kennedy Patent'' Mitt, Each. 
steel frame and lace back and thumb; finest 
buckskin, with throwing glove, «10.00 

No. 7/0. Spalding's Special League Mitt,extra 
flaebuckskin,heavilypadded,lacedanaround; 
the finest catchers' glove made, with throw- 
ing glove, - - - - - - 

No. 6/0. Spalding's Professional Mitt, Morrill 
style, all of finest drab buckskin, heavily pad- 
ded; a soft, easy fitting mitt, no throwing 
glove, .----- 

No. 5/0. Spalding's League Milt, finest .select- 
ed hogskin, laced back and well padded; a 
strong, durable mitt, with throwing glove, - 

No. OX. Spalding's "Decker Patent" Mitt, 
hand of soft buckskin-, back of selected hog- 
skin, laced and .sole leather reinforce on back 
for additional protection, well made and pad- 
ded; with throwing glove, 



7.50 



6.00 



5.00 



3.50 



No. O. Spalding's Catchers' Mitt, hand of vel- 
vet tanned buck, back piece selected hogskin, 
laced back and well padded, with throwing 
glove, .-..-. 3.00 



No. OX. 




No. 3. 



No. 



No. A. Spalding's Amateur Mitt, extra qual- 
ity leather, heavily padded, laced back, with 
throwing glove, - - . - 



No, 3. Spalding's Practice Mitt, hand of grain 
leather, back of sheepskin, laced all around 
and well padded, no throwing glove, • - l.OO 



SPALDING'S BOYS' CATCHERS' MITTS, 



No. OXB. Spalding's "Decker Patent" Boys' Each. 
Mitt, hand-piece of velvet tanned buck, back 
of fine hogskin, sole leather reinforced patent 
back for extra protection to fingers, laced and 
heavily padded. Patent throwing glove with 
each mitt, S2.00 

No. 2. Spalding's Boys' Mitt, yellow tanned 
buckskin, laced back and nicely padded. 
Patent throwing glove with eacli mitt, 

No. 4. Spalding's Boys' Mitt, front and back 
grain leather, hand-piece yellow tanned sheep- 
skiu, laced back and well padded, no throw- 
ing glove, ------ 

No. 5. Spalding's Boys' Mitt, leather front, canvas l)ack, a strong 
and durable glove for boys, no throwing glove. 

Our Complete Illustrated Catalogue, No. 102, Mailed Free. 

A. G. Spaldin? & Bros., '=""=*°;^ew";^^^:^'-''"'* 




1.50 



.50 
.35 



ARE YOU FOND OF ;: :: 

BASE BALL? 
M CYCLING? 

OUT DOOR SPORTS? 

IF SO, YOU SHOULD READ 

Sporting Life 

A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER. 



CLEAN, BRIGHT AND NEWSY. 



SEND FOR FREE SAMPLE COPY 

. TO • 

The Sporting Life 

p. o BOX 948, Philadelphia, Pa, 



'^ "'^-"*'-"^ ALL NEWSDEALERS. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 



I Year, 


• 


$4.00 


6 Months, 




- 2.25 


3 ♦* 


- 


1.25 



SPALDING'S Basemen and Infielders' Mitts. 




No. 3X. Spalding's League Basemen and Each. 
Infielders' Mitt, finest velvet tanned buck- 
skin, soft and pliable, made in rights and 
lefts, $3.00 




No. 4X. Spalding's Basemen and Infielders' 
Mitt, soft tanned brown leather, fine felt 
padding, made in rights and lefts, - 

No. 5X. Spalding's Basemen <"nd Infielders' 
Mitt, made of special gold tanned leather, 
well padded, I'ights and lefts. 



3.00 



1.00 



SPALDING'S 

Basemen and Infielders' Gloves. 

No. XX. Spalding's Basemen and Infield- Each. 
ers' Glove, best (|uality buckskin, made in 
rights and lefts, .... $3.00 

No. X. Spalding's Amateur Infielders' or 
Basemen's Glove, made in rights and lefts, 2.00 



No. XX. 




No. E. 



No. 3/0. 



SPALDING'S 
Short-Fingered Gloves. 

No. E. Youths' size, open back, well padded, 
No. F. Boys' size, open back, - 




SPALDING'S Shoe Plates. 

No. 3/0. Hand Forged Heel Plates, 
No. O. Hand Forged Toe Plates, 
No. 1. Professional Shoe Plates, 
No. 3. Amateur Shoe Plates, 
No. 3. Professional Heel Plates, 



Pair. 

$0.50 

.35 



Pair. 

S0.50 
.50 
.35 
.15 
.35 



No. 0. 




Pitchers' Toe Plates. 

Made of heavy brass and worn on toe of shoe, 
valuable assistant in pitching. 



Rights and Lefts, 



Each. 
$0.50 



Our Complete Catalogue, No. 102, of Spring and Summer Sports 
and General Athletic Goods Mailed Free. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros., '^"'"^.StJ'^oSK."-''"'*' 



The Famous 

St. Lawrence River Skiffs 




DANGEROUS 

position for a man weighing 145 pounds on the gunwale of 
any boat ; but our Famous St. Lawrence River Skiffs will 
stand the test without upsetting the boat or taking in water. 
No other make of boat of its size will do it. If you are in- 
terested in boats send for our illustrated catalogue of 

CANOES, CANOE YAWL3 

SAIL and WORKING BOAT5 

STEAM LAUNCHES and YACHT TENDERS 

And all Kinds of BOAT FITTINGS 

Mailed Free to any Address 



ST. LiflWf{E|S[CE HIVER 

Skiff, Ganoe Steam Itaaneh Go. 



SPALDING'S TRADE MARK BATS. 



No. 7/0. Each. 

No. 7/0. Spalding's Special Wagon Tongue Bat, hand scraped, 

patent rough handle, ...... $1.35 

No. 6/0. Spalding's New Special Model Axe Handle Bat, finest 

ash, patent rough handle, ...... 1.50 



No. 3/0. Each. 

No. 3/0. Spalding's Special Black End League Player's Wagon 
Tongue Ash Bat, patent rough handle, .... $1.00 

No. OX. Spalding's Special Black End Axletree Bat, fine 
straight grained Ash, . - - . . . . .50 

No. 3X. Spalding's Black ;End Antique Finish Bat, extra qual- 
ity Ash, .... . . . . , .25 



No. 4. Spalding's Black End Willow Bat, highly polished and Each. 
very light, $0.50 

No. 3. Spalding's Black End Bass Wood Bat, highly polished, - .25 

SPALDING'S TRADE MARK BOYS' BATS. 



No. XXX. Spalding's Special Black End Boys' League Bat, Each. 

finest quality, S0.50 

No. OXB. Spalding's Special Black End Axletree Boys' Bat, 

length 30 and 32 inches, - - ..... .25 



No. 3B. Spalding's Black End Boys' Basswood Bat, highly Each. 

polished, ......... $;o.lO 

No. 56. Spalding's Black End Youths' Maple Bat, stained and 

polished, gilt stripes, - - - - - . - .10 

No. 53. Spalding's Black End Youths' Maple Bat, polished, gilt 

stripes, ......... .10 

No. 54. Spalding's Black End Boys' Maple Bat, black stripes, 

26 to 28 inches, ........ .05 

Our complete Catalogue of Spring and Summer Sports, No. 102, 

mailftfl frpp. ,, 

Ar C«>^1rl{*^/r O T>^/^o CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA, 
. G. Spalaing & Bros., new york. 



CHAMPION JAMES J. CORBETT 

USED THE 

"Corbett" 

(TRADE MARK) 

Boxipg Gloves 

Manufactured by A. J. REACH CO., 
Tulip and Palmer Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 

■n his Fight with niTciiELL '^VrT.iirr^^'i^' 



The REACH 

l8 on the Wrist 




Trafle Mart 

of every Glove. 



An Exact Duplicate of the Gloves used by CORBETT 
will be sent upon Receipt of Price. 

Per Set, - - $7.50. 

If you cannot get them in your city, address 

A. J. REACH CO., 

Tulip and Palmer Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 




SPALDING'S 

TRADE Mark Base Balls 

Tlin Spalding League Ball 

adopted hy tJie National League 
and Aniei ican Axsociation of Pro- 
fcssionnl ]Jaso Ball Clubs. War- 
raiiled (o hiHt a full game witlioul 
ripping or losing its clastlciiy „r 
shape. 



No. 1. Onicial League Ball, 

No. O. Double Seam Ball, ' . 

No. 1 B. Boys' League Bal', . . 

No. 2. Professional Ball, 

No. 3. Amateur Ball, .... 

No. i>. King of the Diamond .... 

No. 7. Boys' Favorilo Ball, .... 

No. 71J. League Junior Ball, 

No. 11. Bouncer Ball, .... 

No. 6. Victor Ball, 

No. 14. Boys' Amateur Ball, - . . . 

(All of the above in scj)arate box and .sealed.) 
No. 8. lOureka Ball, - . . . . 

No. 915. Boys' Lively Bali, .... 

No. 13. llocket Ball, ..... 
No. 15. Dandy Ball, 
No. IG. Boss, 4-piece Ball, .... 

(The above not in separate box.) 



Each. 
)ii(i.50 

1.50 

1 .()() 

1.00 
.75 
.50 
.36 
.25 
.25 
.20 
.16 

.10 
.10 
.05 
.06 
.05 



OUR COMPLETE CATALOGUE OF 

Sprin? and Summer Sports, Athletic and 
Gymnasium Goods. 

any'^'idresf complete catalogue of its kind ever issued mailed free to 

A. G. Spalding & Bros., 

Chicago. Philadelphia. New York. 



PECK & SNYDER, 

Corner 
BEEKflAN AND NASSAU NEW YORK, 

STREETS, 

Manufacturers of the 
Celebrated 

American Club Ice Skates. 



Complete Line of 

Roller Skates, 

Complete Catalogue of 

Summer and Winter Sports; 

Also our 

Trick and Novelty Catalogue, 

Embracing thousands of interesting and 
amusing novelties for the home circle, 

: SENT FREE UPON APPLICATION : 




SpohtsiweK'S Weah 



AND 



* EQUIPMENTS. ^ 



NO GOODS SOLD AT RETAIL where Dealers 

Carry Our Line. Ask Your Dealer for 

Barnard's Goods; if He Cannot 

Supply You Send Direct to Us. 



Send for Catalogue. 



GEO. BARNARD & CO., 

1, 3 and 5 Bond Street, 199 and 201 Madison Street. 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. 




No. A. 




Spaldings' Catchers' Masks. 

Each. 
No. 4/0. Spalding's Sun Protecting Mask, finest 
quality, ...... )$5.00 

No. 3/0. Spalding's Neck Protecting Mask, - 4.00 

No. 2/0. Spalding's Special League Mask, extra 
heavy wire, -.--.. 3.50 

No. 0. Spalding's Regulation Mask, heavy wire, 3.00 

No. A. Spalding's Amateur Mask, made in same 
style as our League Mask, but' wire not so 
heavy; guaranteed lirct class. 

No. B. Spalding's Amateur Boys' Mask, same 
as No, A, in boys' sizes, .... 

No. C. Spalding's Youths' Mask, without head 
or chin piece, ..... 

No. D. Spalding's Boys' Mask, wiiliout head or 
chiu piece, ...--. 

No. E. Spalding's Boys' Mask, lighter wire, 
without head or chiupiece, 



1.75 

1.50 

1.00 

.50 

.35 



SPALDING'S BODY PROTECTORS. 

GRAY'S PATENT. 

Made of Bubber and inflated with air. The only safe and 
reliable body protector. 

Each. 
$10.00 

- 10.00 

- 6.00 



No. oo. Umpire Body Protect(jr, 
No. O. League " " 

No. 1. Amateur " '• 



^^^) 



Per Set. 



SPALDING'S BASES. 

Tliree Bases to a Set. 

Q^ -—■- X 1^ Xo. 0. League Club Bases, extra quality, quilted, 

^ Willi spikes, ..---- S7.50 

Xo. 1. Best Canvas Base.s, not quilted, with spikes, - - 5.00 

No. 2. Ordinary Canvas Bases, with spikes, ... - 4.00 

HOME PLATES. 

^ Rubber Home Plates, League Regulation, com- Each. 

•"^^^^^ plete with spikes, »7.50 

1^ I ^I'l'"'^'^ \\ox\\^ Plates, best quality, - - 2.00 

» li ' Plate for Pitcher's Box, . . - - 5.00 

Send for our Complete Catalogue, No. 102, to any of our Stores. Mailed free. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros., ^"'"°n°ew''?o'-rk"''"'*- 



Tbc Sportiosf News 




OP 



ST. LOUFS 



A. H. 5PINK, Editor 

C. C. SPINK, 

Business Manager 



The brightest and best 
base ball paper publish- 
ed in the world. Its 
subscription price, 

$1.00 a Year 

is less than two cents 
a copy. Send names 
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paper. 



THE 

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ST. LOUIS, MO. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL SPOETING EULES 

Containing the latest rules eoverning ail kinds of sports. The most complete 
and up-to-date book of its kind published. The only book ever published that con 
tains the complete rules for all sports. Compiled by James E. Sullivan, Secretary 
of the Amateur Athletic Union of the Unitecl States. 

€ <» >' T A 1 N I N G K U L K S Governing Athletics, Duties of Referee and all 
Officials at Games, Bicycling, Rowing, Golf, Hockey, (.'urling, Polo, Gymnasticp, 
Foot Ball, Racquets, I^wn Tennis, ^^ restling, all Styles; Boxing, London Priae 
Ring Rules; Dog Racing, Canoeing, Fencing, Basket Ball, Gaelic and Association 
Foot Ball, Hand Ball, Water Polo. Base Ball, Cricket, Croquet, Pigeon Flying, Laws 
of Betting, Equestrian Polo. Hitch and kick, Sack Racing, Shuffle Board, Cross 
Country Runnmg, Lacrosse, Swimming, Snow Shoe Racing, Rife Shooting, Pistol 
Shooting, and many other sports. 

Accurate and complete in every particular. Price, 50 Cents, Postpaid 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN! 

1. ART OF CURVE PITCHING. 3. ART OF ZIG-ZAG CURVE PITCHING. 

2. ART OF BATTING. 4. ART OF BASE RUNNING. 

These four books ouglit to be read by every ball player in America. Altbougrh 
written for amateurs they are highly recommended by professionals. You can 
get more information from them in two hours of careful study than you can get 
from field practice In two years, and for a very little money, too. They are plain, 
prtictical, and scientific, and at the price no player can afford to be •«v-ithout 
them. Nearly 31000 copies have been sold. Price, by mail, li cents each— the four 
at one time for 50 cents. Send stamp at once for special dUcounts to clubs. 
A premium to every tenth purchaser. Write plainly. Wrap coin in paper. 

Address, _ 

EDWARD J. PRINDLE, Torrington, Conn. 

A. G. Spalding & Bros. 



THE MOST ACCURATE AND ELEGANTLY ILLUSTRATED 
CATALOGUE EVER PUBLISHED IN THE WORLD IS NOW 
READY, AND WILL BE SENT TO ANY ADDRESS IN THE 
UNITED STATES OR CANADA FREE UPON APPLICATION. 

IT EMBRACES 

Base Ball, Lawn Tennis, Cricket, Croquet, Golf, Foot 

Ball, Gymnasium Apparatus, Athletic Implements, 

Bicycles and Cycling Sundries, Boats, Books 

on all Sports, and Uniforms for all 

Indoor and Outdoor Sports. 



NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 



SPALDING'S UNIFORM GOODS, 

BASE BALL BELTS. 




No. 2, 




No, 4, 



WORSTED WEB BELTS. 

2K inches wide. 
No. 00. Special League Belt, - 
No. 8. Worsted Web, double leather 

covered buckle, 
No. 47. Worsted Web, single leather 

covered buckle, 

COTTON WEB BELTS. 

2}4 inches wide. 
No. 23. Double strap, nickel buckle, 
No. 4. Single strap, leather mounted, 
plain buckles, • . . I 



Each. 
S0.50 

.50 

.50 



.85 
.15 



BASE BALL STOCKINGS. 

Per Pair 
00. Heavy, ribbed, linen sole, Sl.35 
O. Medium, ribbed, linen sole, lio 
3/0. Extra heavy, plain, 

No. 3/0. Extra heavy, striped. 

No. 1. All Avool, heavy. 

No. 3. All wool, medium, - 

No. 3. Wool, ordinary weight. 

No. 4. Cotton Stockings, - 




1.50 

3.00 

- 1.00 

.75 

.50 

.40 

SPALDING'S BASE BALL SHOES. pair. 
No 2/0. Kangaroo, hand-sewed, with 
V/ ^ ^ ''^^^^' ----- SS7.50 
^ 1/0. French calf, hand sewed 

ith plates, - - . - 6.00 

^ IX. Fine calf, hand sewed, with 
1 ates, - . , . 4 (^^ 

No. 3. Best canvas, - . . 3.00 

QT^nSc^A^^l"?^®^® Illustrated Catalogue, No. 103, of Spring and Summer 
Sports. Athletic and Gymnasium Goods is the most comniete ever ^^ned 
and replete with interesting matter. Mailed free by addressinl 

A. G. Spalding &. Bros., 

CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA, on NEW YORK. 




SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY, 

Published rionthly. Each Number Complete. 

Devoted to all kinds of Sports. 



No. 1. Life and Battles of James J. Corbett. 

No. 2. Indian Clubs and Dumb Bells. By J. H. Dougherty, 

Amateur Champion of America. 

No. 3. Bowling. By A. E. VoGELL. Containing Instructions how to 
Bowl, How to Score. How to Handicap. 

No. 4. Boxing. This book is without doubt the most valuable manual 
of its liind ever published. It is fully Illustrated. 

No. 5. Gymnastics. By ROBERT Stoll, N. Y. A. C, America's Champ- 
ion on the Flying Rings since 1885. 

No. 6. Lawn Tennis. By 0. S. Campbell, Champion Player of 
America. Valuable for beginners as well as experts; rules of the game 
complete. 

No. 7. Base Ball. By Walter Camp, Specially adapted for Colleges 
and preparatory schools. Complete history of college base ball. 

No. 8. Golf. By. J. Stuart Balfour, Containing List of Implements 
and their uses, Glossary of Technical Terms and Latest Revised Rules 
of the Game. 

No. 9. Athletes' Guide. Articles on Training, by H, S. Cornish ; 
How to Train for Distiince Running, by T. P. ConnetT; Sprinting, by 
Harry Jewett; Throwing Weights, by James Mitchel; Walking, by 
S. Liebgold; Jumping, Hurdling, Pole Vaulting, by A. A. Jordan; and 
Rules for the Government of Athletic Games. 

No. 10. Croquet. Official Rules of the Game as adopted by the National 
Croquet Association. 

No. 11. Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide and Referee's 
Book. Revised by Walter Camp. Authorized and adopted by the 
American Intercollegiate Association. 

No. 13. Gaelic and Association Foot Ball. Complete Methods 
and Rules of each Game. 

No. 13. Hand Ball. How to Play it. Rules and Definitions, Regu- 
lation Court and its Construction, with other interesting matter. 

No. 14. Curling, Hockey and Polo. Rules governing each game, 
and other valuable information. 

No. 15. Indoor Base Ball Guide. Complete Illustrations for Play- 
ing, with Description of Game. 

No. 16. Skating. History ol Skating, from earliest appearance to the 
present day, to which is added a list of the most authentic record.s. 

No. 17. Basket Ball. Latest Revised Rules, with diagrams showing 
position of Players, etc. 

No. 18. Fencing. Complete Manual of Foil and Sabre, according to 
the methods of the best modern school. 

EACH, POSTPAID, 10 CENTS. 



AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING CO. 

241 Brosi^waiyf iS^w YorK. 



SPALDING'S UNIFORM GOODS, 



BASE BALL SHIRTS. 



Shirts, 



^ 


si; 


rt 


<r 


^^ 


N 


^n 


\l4. 


f 




H 




m 


m 


m 


k 



Shirts, 



regular 

- $6.00 
pajama 

- 7.00 



Lace Frout. 



Button Frout. 



No. O quality 

styles, 
No. O quality 

style, 
No. 1 quality Shirts, 
No. 2 " " 

No. 3 " 
No. 4 " " 

No. 5 " " for boys, 

Boys' Shirts in sizes up to and iucluding 
• 14-inch collar. 



5.00 
3.50 
2.50 
1.75 
1.25 



BASE BALL PANTS. 

Plain. 



aoi 



No. O quality Pants, 

No. 1 

No. 2 ' " 

No. 3 

No. 4 

No. 5 



for boys, 



S5.00 
3.75 
2.75 
2.00 
1.25 
1.00 



Padded. 
$6.00 
4.50 
3.50 
2.75 
2.00 



Padded Pants, Boys' Pants in sizes up to and Including 30 inch waist. 
BASE BALL CAPS. 



Chicago, College, Eton. Skull, Jockey and Boston Styles. 



No. O quality, best flannel. 
No. 1 quality, lighter flannel, 
No. 2 quality, good flannel, - 
No. 3 quality, ordinary flannel, 
No. 4 quality, light flannel, - 

CHEAP CAPS. 




Chicago Style. 



No. 

No. 



121. 
122. 



Felt Cap, lined, 
Felt Cap, unlined, 



Each, 
$1.00 
.75 
.65 
.50 
.40 



.85 

.15 



Our Catalogue of Spring and Summer Sports, Athletic Uniforms, 
Gymnasium Goods and Appliances, is the most complete ever issued on 
these Goods. Mailed free. 



A. G. Spalding & Bros., 

CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA. NEW YORK. 



TAKE THH 



M [IN ON ROUTE 



(j jjLoutsvaiE. NEW Albany » CHICAGO by.co.(( 9 

C- .r-,r— • 

BETWEEN 

CHICAGO 

LAFAYETTE, INDIANAPOLIS, 

LOUISVILLE, CINCINNATI, 

AND ALL POINTS SOUTH. 



THE FINE TRAINS 

The Velvet and Electrc 

Operated over the Cincinnati Route are unsurpassed by any 
line to the South. It is also the only Dining Car line to the 
Ohio River. 

Elegant Pullman Perfected Safety Vestibule Sleeping Com- 
partment Cars on night trains. Parlor Chair Cars on all day 
trains. 

TICKieXS 

For sale at all Coupon Offices. For Maps, Schedules, etc., 
inquire at 

city ticket office, 232 clark st, 
Dearborn Station, Chicago, 

(>R ADDRESS 

W. H. McDOEL, FRANK J. REED, 

General Manager. General Passenger Agent. 




The Through Car Route 

Between Chicago and 
5T. PAUL, 

niNNEAPOLIS, 
DULUTH, 

ASHLAND, 
COUNCIL BLUFF S, 
OMAHA, 

SIOUX CITY, 

DENVER, 
OQDEN, 

PORTLAND, 



SAN FRANCISCO , 
and Principal Cities of the 

WEST AND NORTHWEST. 



Solid Vestibule Trains, 

Palace Sleeping Cars, 
Buffet Smoking and Library Cars, 
Free Reclining Chair Cars, 

Luxurious Parlor Cars and 
Superb Dining Cars 

are features of the perfect service afforded 
patrons of the 

CHICAGO & NORTHWESTERN RY. 



W. H. NEWriAN, 3d Vice Pres. J. H. WHITHAN, Gen'l Manager. 
W. A. THRALL, Gen'l Pass'r and Ticket Agent. 



SPALDING'S CLUB BAT BAGS. 



r 



No. 2. 

No. O. League Club Bag, sole leather, for 18 l)ats, 
No. 1. Cauvas Club Bag, leather ends, for 24 bats, 
No. 2. Canvas Club Bag, leather ends, for 12 bats, 



c 



INDIVIDUAL BAGS. 



Each. 

S15.00 

- 5.00 

4.00 



No. 01. Sole Leather Bag, for two bats, 

No. 02. Heavy Canvas Bag, leather reinforce at both ends, 

No. 03. Canvas Bag, leather reinforce at one end, - 



Each. 

!S4.00 

1.50 

1.00 



ATHLETES' UNIFORM BAG. 

For carrying Base Ball and other uniforms, made to roll, and 
will not wrinkle or soil same; separate compartment for shoes. Each. 

No. 1. Canvas Uniform Bag, ...... $2.00 

No. 2. LeathfT • " . . . . . . 3.50 






SPALDING'S INDICATORS. 

Each. 
No. O. Umpire Indicators, - - - #0.50 

No. 1. Scoring Tables, - - - .25 



SCORE BOOKS. 



Pocket Sizes. 



No. 1 . Taper Cover, 7 games, 
No. 2. Board "22 " 
No. 3. " " 46 " 



Club Si 



No. 4. Board Cover, 30 games. 

No. 5. Cloth " 60 

No. 6. " " 90 

No. 7. " " 120 



Score Cards, per doz., 25c. 



Each. 

- «0.10 
.25 
.50 



1.00 
1.75 
2. 50 
3.00 



Our Complete Catalogue, No. 102, handsomely illustrated, and the 
most complete on General Athletic Qoods ever issued, mailed 
free to any address. 



A. G. Spalding: & Bros., "'"'^'^^n^e^TyoSk."-''""'' 



Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul R'y. 



Steam Heated and Electric Lighted Ves- 

tibuled Trains between Chicago, St. 

Paul and Minneapolis. 
Electric Lighted and Steam Heated Ves- 

tibuled Trains between Chicago, Council 

Bluffs and Omaha. 
Finest Dining Cars in the world. 
Free Reclining Chair Cars between 

Chicago and Omaha. 
Fast Mail Line between Chicago, Mil- 
waukee, St. Paul and Minneapolis. 
Transcontinental Route between Chicago, 

Council Bluffs and Omaha, or St. Paul. 
5,700 miles of road in Illinois, Wisconsin, 

Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, South and 

North Dakota. 
Everything First-Class. 
First-Class People Patronize First- Class 

Lines. 
Ticket Agents everywhere sell Tickets 

over the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. 

Paul Railway. 



THE Lake Region of 



Northern Wisconsin and Michigan. 

Brief Mention of some of the Principal Resorts on the line of 
the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway. 



THE POPULAR NORTH WOODS SANITARIUM. 

GOGCBIC I^AKH, I»IICH.— Twelve miles distant and 900 feel 
above the wafersot Lake Superior. It is lifteen miles lougand one aud one- 
half to three miles wide, and alFords ttie iiest black bass lisliing known any- 
where. Brook trout are found in tributary streams, and at certain seasons 
of Mie year very larj?e brook irout are caiiglit in the open lake. Goj?ebic 
Lake is a favorite resort for those sutl'ering from hay fever or throat and 
lung trouides. Tlie hotel aud cottafxes will remain under the management 
of Geo. P. McAdam, Avho can furnish first class accommodations for 100 
guests. Fine fleet of boats, steam yacht, etc. 

X'WIN I^AKES,lfVIS.—<Conover Railroad Station). This popular 
resort will continue under tne auspices of tiioTwin Lakes Fishing and llunt- 
iHgClub It will be open the entire season not only to club members, butas 
lieretofore, for the entertainment of fishermen and their familiesor tiiose in 
search of health and recreation. 15. F. Kouatz, who had unmediate charge 
last season, will continue as Superintendent. Twin Lakes is widely known 
for its excellent muskallonge, pickerel and pike fishing. Guides, boats, etc. 

"WAXERSIIIEEX, MICH.— Fine brook trout fishing to be had 
in various streams, some very near the station. Hotel accommodations, 
guides, etc. 

I^AKC VIEUX OESERT.— (State Line Stati<m, Wis.) Head 
waters of the Wi.sconsin lUver. Splendid muskallonge fishing. Boats and 
guides are to be had. This lake ailords many fine camping spots. 

**EAGL,E 1JVAXERS,»' WIS.— Comprises a chain of twenty- 
seven lakes, all easily reached by steamer or row boat from Eagle Hiver 
Railroad station, and all oiler fine sport with muskallonge, bass and pike. 
Hotels, boats, guides and steamer at Eagle River Station. 

THREE I^.4.K:ES, "WIS.- a railroad .station in proximity to the 
southern portion of the "Kagle Waters" chain of lakes. Hotels, boats, guides. 

XOMAHAl^VK I.AKE, IJVIS.— Noted for its fine muskallonge 
and ba.ss fishing. Tiu-re are hotels. l)()ats and guidesai Tomahawk Ljike St. 
(;ermaiu Lake, Lost, Found, Plum, Star and Laura Lakes are easily 
acce,><sible. 

TROUT L, AKE, 'WIS.— Noted for the great number and large size 
of the " land-locked sannon "that are taken from its waters. Bass are taken 
in this lakeand muskallonge in the surrounding waters. Uotel,boats, guides. 

HIATSITO'WISH RIVER, WIS.— Connects quite a chain of 
lakes. Including Rest. Manitowish, Rice, Alder and Trout l.Akes,allof which 
contain bass, muskallonge and pike, and some have been fished but very 
little. Boats and guides can lie secured. 

TURTLK IlIVEIl, "WI.S.— Connects quite a system of lakes in- 
cluding Rice, Echo. Spider, Turtle, Long and a number of others. Fine fisii- 
ing is reported from those that have visited these waters. 

For additional or detailed information regarding the I..ake Region, or for 
copy of Guide Rook, address, 

J. S. BAKROW. City Pass. Agent. I ^^.j. ,.,^_^ ^. i-uuaho 

E. 1). P.\IIMELEE, City Ticket Agent, f ^^^ '-'*^*' St., (.uicaoo. 
C. L. RYDER, Cien. Pass. Agt., Milwaukee, Wis. 




AS GOOD AS GOLD AND UNEQDALLED AT THE PRICE. 



PACER The "CREDENDA PACER 
• reputation second to none. 



has earned for itself a 
The weight has been 
materially reduced, a direct-acting plunger-brake applied which, 
with the new " Spalding " saddle, combines to make a popular and 
thoroughly reliable mount PRICE, $100. 

CONSORT ^^^ "CREDENDA CONSORT," so well known 
^ * as a companion of the " Credenda Pacer " needs 
little or no comment. Though new last season, it attained great 
popularity as an easy running, staunch and reliable mount, 
especially designed for ladies. It will be supplied with 53-inch gear 
unless otherwise ordered. PRICE, $100. 

ROADSTER ^^^ " ^'^^^'^'^^^ roadster " is a strictly 

• high grade machine throughout, constructed 

of best materials, and as a machine for every day practical use, at a 

moderate price, cannot be surpassed. PRICE, $85. 

CONSORT JUNIOR. L".f^rn r'^c'^eiU^ pt"; 

Junior," the frame differing in that it is of the dropped pattern. Its 
graceful lines and light, airy appearance will commend it to all. 

PRICE, $75. 
■p Ap"p"P TTTNTO"P ^ ^®^ departure in the general line of 
ITAV^CIV ^UniWrV. ^j^ggi building will be found in this 
new, strictly high grade, 26-inch machine, intended for the use of the 
"rising generation." Its construction is the very best, and its 
material as good as can be had. PRICE, $65. 

Our "Spalding" and "Credenda" Catalogue will give you all 
the details in construction and other interesting features of 
these Bicycles ; sent free to any address. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

CHICAGO, NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA. 



ChicagfO&Alton R.R. 



PERFECT PASSENGER SERVICE BETWEEN 



CHICAGO and ST. LQU15 
CHICAGO and KANSAS CITY 
ST. L0UI5 and KANSAS CITY. 



THE DIRECT LINE TO 

Through Sleeping Cars 

Every Day from 

Chicago. 



THE SHORT LINE TO 

HOT SPRINGS, ARK. 

THE WORLD'S 

GREATEST 

SANITARIUM. 



THE BEST LINE FROM CHICAGO 
. . TO ALL POINTS . . 

West, Northwest, South and 
Southwest. 



PULLMAN VESTIBULE TRAINS AND PALACE RECLINING 
CHAIR CARS, Free of Extra Charge, over a completely 
Stone Ballasted, Dustless Roadbed. 



CHICAGO CITY i qC PT k\>V QT 

TICKET OFFICE 1 "-> LLAKJV M. 

R. SOMBRVILLB, City Pasteof er and Ticket Agent. 



THE GREATEST HEALTH 



AND 



PLEASURE RESORTS, 

THE FINEST SHOOTING and FISHING GROUNDS 
AND THE GRANDEST SCENERY 

of the entire West are located along the 
lines of the Santa Fe^ Route, the great- 
est railroad in the world, and the only 
one with its own tracks from Chicago 
and St. Louis through to the Gulf of 
Mexico and the Pacific Coast. The 
lines of the Santa Fe Route pass 
through Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Ark- 
ansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Col- 
orado, New Mexico, Arizona and 
California. Through train service daily 
between principal points. The finest 
equipment and the best dining service 
in America. Consult the nearest ticket 
agent of the Santa Fe Route for partic- 
ulars as to rates and trains when you 
wish to travel in the West. Attractive 
illustrated descriptive literature fur- 
nished free on application to C. A. 
HiGGiNS, Assistant General Manager 
and Ticket Agent, 725 Monadnock 
Building, Chicago, 111, 



SPALDING'S COMPLETE UNIFORMS. 



Our line of nannels for Base Ball Uniforms consists of five qualities and 
over forty different patterns. Each grade is kept up to the highest point 
of excellence, and patterns -changed every season ; base ball players may 
be assured that whatever grade of uniform is selected, it will be the very 
best that can be furnished for the money. On orders for complete sets 
of uniforms, we make no charge for lettering ; on orders for single suits 
we charge five cents per letter. Special measurement blanks, samples 
of flannel and belt webbing for all the following uniforms furnished on 
application. 



Plain Pants, 
No. O Uniform, complete, - - S 14.00 

No. 1 Uniform, " - - 11.00 

No. 3 Uniform, " - - 8.00 

No. 3 Uniform, " - - 6.76 

No. 4 Uniform, " - - 3.76 

No. 5 Boy's Uniform, complete, - ».75 

Padded Pants extra as follows: 

On No. O Uniform, - Sl.OO Per Pair 

On Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 Uniforms, .75 " 

Samples of Flannels and Measurement Blanks 
Mailed on Application. 



Send for Our Complete Catalogue, No. 102, 
Mailed Free. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA, NEW YORK. 



M ichigan Hentp al 




NIAGARA FALLS ROUTE" 

AND THE ROUTE OF THE FAST 
VESTIBULED TRAIN 

THE NORTH SHORE LIMITED 

AND OTHER FAST TRAINS BETWEEN 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK, BOSTON AND NEW EN&LAND POINTS, VIA 
NEW - YORK » CENTRAL - AND = HUDSON - RIVER 

AND BOSTON AND ALBANY RAILROADS. 
IT IS THE ONivV LINE 

Running Directly by and in 

FULL VIEW OF NIAGARA FALLS. 

IT IS SOUDLY CONSTRUCTED, MAGNIFICENTLY EQ UIPPED. TIGIUNTLY OPERATED. 

And Spares no Pains nor Expense to secure 
The Comfort, Convenience and Safety of its Patrons. 



L. D. HEUSNER, City Passenger and Ticket Agent, 
67 Clark Street, Corner Randolph, Chicago. 

Robert Miller, Gen. Supt. O. W. Ruggles, Gen. Pass. & Tkt. Agt. 
Detroit. . Chicaqo. . 




SEND FOR OUR 
COMPLETE 

ILLUSTRATED 
CATALOGUE 



Manufacturers of the 




Famous 

Campbell 

Racket 



Publishers of the 
OFFICIAL 

LawQ Tenuis 
GuidB 



LAWN 
TENNIS, 

BASE BALL. 
ATHLETIC GOODS 



DNiFomns 

FOR ALL 

ODT DOOR SPORTS 

Wri§:ht & Ditson*s Leagfue Base Ball 

Warranted equal to any League Ball made. Each 
Ball carefully made, wrapped in tin foil, and put up 
in separate box and sealed. . . . ^1*00 




Retan, 34. W^hington St.. , ^q^jq^ j^^^^ 
Wholesale, 95 Pearl St., ) ' 



SPALDING'S 

iSTAGON TONGUE BATS. 



The bats are made of the finest 
tralght - grained, second growth 
sh. The timber used in their 
lanufacture has been sea- 
Dned for at least five years 
nd is entirely free from 
nots and other imperfec- 
ons. They are used 
y all the leading 
rofessional Ball 
layers, and are 
lade in proper 
1 o d e 1 s and 



ingths to suit 
11 batsmen. 



h 



f- 




From 
Season 
to Season 
these bats 
have shown 
1 nprovement 
in every essential 
and vital quality, 
material and finish. 
OurNewPatent Rough 
Handle introduced two 
seasons ago, has been 
highly endorsed by all 
players. This handle en- 
ables the batsman to secure 
a firmer grip, prevents the bat 
slipping, and is in every way an 
advantage to all batsmen. 



OUR COMPLETE CATALOGUE OF 

^ASE BALL, LAWN TENNIS # MISCELLANEOUS 
ATHLETIC # SPORTING GOODS '^"'''JdSs'" ^^"^ 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



CHICAGO, 



NEW YORK. 



PHILADELPHIA. 




ADOPTED BY THE N^VS 



plational League ?^ £mepic M.,AM gl°'^MgB. 



Foe 1894 



^: 




; Thf S1*.\I.1)I\(; OFFICIAL Li:A(jrK 1>ALI. has been the adopted Ball 
of the .\uliv>iuil Liuqiu- tor tl!v piist sect iitecn years, and has agHiii 
biiri adopted bq the. ncic \ational League and American Associa- 
tion ^^'^v<i*:^'OSt'^''^"^'^' ^^ '^''^' excellent qualities or the Spaldiiiq 
Leaguc-Bair^hli'vni ballis carePiilh) iirrapped in tin foil. Packed in a 
box and sccurclij scaled, and is fully aarranted to stand the test, 
of a full qame icithout ripping nor losing its elasticity or shape. 

PRICE. PCR DozFN, $15 00. Single Ball. $1 50 



N 



[ 



is.^ 



i 



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